teachers leaving

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Wildcat, Dec 1, 2008.

  1. Wildcat

    Wildcat Rookie

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    Dec 1, 2008

    So many of our good teachers are leaving schools to enter the private sector. Not all of them quote a low salary as the reason, which is strange. They all complain about the huge amount of admin and the large sizes of the classrooms. Up to 48 kids per class. I had 42 pupils in one of my classes, that was tough. When we were at young and at school, our biggest class was 25. I am a bit worried about our education system, especially for my own daughter who is nearly 10. What will happen to her in high school when she has maths or science? :unsure: So many of these teachers have already left. What is the situation in your schools?
     
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  3. AltEdTeacher1

    AltEdTeacher1 Rookie

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    Dec 2, 2008

    The hard facts

    I won the Teacher of the Year award in 2006 and by 2008 (five years of teaching) I was burnt out of the 'crap' and high standards teachers are held to. Don't get me wrong we certainly should be held to high standards, but when you pay the profession in the bottom 15% of professions requiring a min of a Bachelor and in most cases eventual earning of a Masters. Can you name any other industry that requires so much and gives so little.

    Let's look at the top management. Those who sit behind the desk earn in the 6 digits, while those who are required to meet strick accountability earn very little--all for what?

    Thus, I elected to move into the private sector and now am able to think on my own, earn a competitive salary, and most importantly am not thrust in high standards which can never be acheived.
     
  4. Wildcat

    Wildcat Rookie

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    Dec 2, 2008

    What did you teach and what are you doing now?

    I used to teach high school (13yrs up) English. I have been teaching private classes for the past 14 years, work one on one with the kids who come for extra help: either to pass or to get that distinction or to maintain their marks. I love working like this, can determine how many pupils I take in in the afternoons, am able to make time for Nicky. Do a month's planning ahead or quickly in the mornings, am able to change that when the child walks in with a specific problem that day. Their is now set curriculum I have to follow each day. This makes it nice being your own boss.. .

    The only downside is that my income isn't constant, I often say: "When is (re money) enough enough? When they SMS from class or phone to let me know they reached their target... wow! Then I know I am doing the right thing.
     
  5. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Dec 2, 2008

    Our classes are capped at 36 so I can't even begin to imagine what 45+ would be like.

    That said, we really just have a lot of whiners among our teachers. They spout the same nonsense as the guy above who says we are overworked despite working 7 hr days (only 4hrs, 20 mins of which are actually with students!), 180 days a year and complaining about these high standards that nobody ever enforces anyway. You talk about some fat cat sitting behind a desk but I know teachers who barely even manage to do that and still get their paycheck.

    I get to play with kids all day, have tons of time still at home and get more vacations that I would ever use - I would never give up my teaching job.
     
  6. historygrrl

    historygrrl Rookie

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    Dec 2, 2008

    I have no intention of leaving teaching at this point but I can understand why some would. While I think there are some whiners out there, I also know there are some with legitimate complaints. The chief one among teachers at my school is lack of support from the administration, who is only interested in looking good for the boss. It is frustrating to have all these demands placed upon you when you are trying to help students succeed, which is why we are ultimately here.
     
  7. Sheba

    Sheba Companion

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    Dec 2, 2008

    I get a tonne of holidays throughout the year, but when school is in full swing I'm BUSY. I have lots of periods of down-time here and there I kill on the Internet, but making original lesson plans that make productive use of all the minutes I have in the classroom takes a lot of time. So does researching and trying to get a better handle on my field. If you have so much free time it makes me wonder what you're preparing for the 15-30 or however many hours you have in the classroom a week. It takes the average person many hours worth of personal feedback to learn how to write a good social studies paper. Presumably you have 100+ students. If your days are filled with leisure one has to wonder how productively you're using your time.

    As to the OP, the answer's quite obvious. No amount of money is worth having to put up with certain BS and disrespect for some people. I will not put up with being treated like rubbish at school. I try my best to be respectful to the senior teachers and will gladly help other teachers out whenever they need it. But God help anyone who tries to undermine me, especially if it's a teacher with less seniority than me. The same goes for any students who hope to treat my class as free time. And you know what? Once you’ve established yourself as someone who doesn’t take crap you rarely get any. If a school doesn't want to take me seriously I will walk out the door, and did on one occasion. In that case I didn't walk over to a new line of work, though I may well have had there been an opportunity waiting for me.

    Watch this series: http://ie.youtube.com/watch?v=ae1gmuKeuXw (part 1 of 6)

    I would hesitate to take a job at any but the last school (the one with the African principal who isn't very fond of BS himself) featured in this series for $100,000 / year. If I did it would only be with the attitude that I'll try to enjoy the farce for the money. What 'professional' could stand to work in such a place? Would a doctor work in an understaffed hospital that lacked sterile conditions? Would a lawyer work for a firm that abetted embezzlement? Only a really mercenary one.
     

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