TEACHERS IN PRIVATE SCHOOLS- ANY PROSPECTS?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Rutherford, Jul 8, 2017.

  1. Rutherford

    Rutherford Rookie

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    Do teachers who work in private schools have bright prospects? I use Nigeria as a case study. Huge number of teachers in Nigeria teach in private schools. The reason is that there is a limited space in public schools. From this situation, has emerged a visible disturbing phenomenon: they are poorly paid (in some cases salary is delayed), they bear heavy workload often handling many classes in a day, continuous drift from school to school, most live from hand to mouth, etc. Is this the situation in your country? How do we reverse this ugly trend?
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    It honestly depends upon the individual school, if it is a private one. They aren't regulated by government as public and even charter ones are. Some private schools are fantastic, others not so much.
     
  4. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    I work in a private school and use to work in a public school. Most of my teacher friends are in public schools, so I do stay in touch with some current public school trends.

    I find that often public schools and private schools are in similar situations. In general private schools pay less. Usually that is between 10%-50% less than public schools. When salaries go up for public school teachers, they often go up for private school teachers.

    Currently the best kept secret seems to be that the number of students in private schools are going down in many areas of the country. Charter schools are able to get students from public and private schools. I would not say that those teaching in private schools have brighter prospects right now. The plus side for those in private schools is that many teachers have more autonomy as many public schools are becoming more test oriented . Otherwise both public and private schools are losing numbers in lots of states with the growth of Charter schools.
     
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  5. Rutherford

    Rutherford Rookie

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    You are right! Only few private schools offer bright prospects for teachers. Sometimes, i wonder when teachers will begin to reap rich rewards from their labour no matter where they are employed
     
  6. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    I've not seen a private school in the area match the salary of the public district. The catholic schools were offering some ridiculous salary....like $29K to start in a major urban area. I'm not even sure how one could live off that. I've never seriously considered taking a job at any private school, even the independent ones.
     
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  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    The rich rewards of teaching are more than monetary.
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Private schools around here do not pay well at all. Even the most expensive private school here pays substantially less than the public schools. The teachers get huge gifts at Christmas and end of the year though. And they don't shell out money for supplies and kids' basic needs like public school teachers do. For the teachers I know, that is.
     
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  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Specialized private schools, such as those for ED/BD students, or those dealing with other disabilities, usually pay well, because the private schools are competing for the same limited number of highly qualified teachers to work with these populations. That makes this a special situation, in my opinion. Religious schools where I live make the least overall. Some districts that are notoriously hard to teach in may pay fairly well, because that's what it takes to get teachers. I know that I am appalled by how low teacher salaries can be in other states. I would say that in NJ our salaries reflect the fact that our cost of living is on the higher side, and add that many districts desire teachers who have more education.
     
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  10. Rutherford

    Rutherford Rookie

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    Teachers deserve the best treatment because they labour to enrich others, governments and other stakeholders should bear this in mind
     
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  11. physteach

    physteach Companion

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    I'm a private school teacher and I get paid the same as I would at a public school.
     
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  12. Rutherford

    Rutherford Rookie

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    I quite agree. Deep satisfaction, joy and a sense of accomplishment are some non monetary rewards. But all these could be affected to some extent if there is no commensurate financial returns. Which teacher would be happy if taking care of his basic needs eludes him? His well of enthusiasm could eventually dry up
     
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  13. Rutherford

    Rutherford Rookie

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    Please, tell us more about it. We are really eager in scaling up our earnings
     
  14. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    I believe the U.S. public school system is excellent, and my post is not being written to decry their effectiveness, but I've worked in private religious schools for most of my career. Most of them were affiliated with the Association for Christian Schools International (ACSI). <https://www.acsi.org/> I've also met teachers and learned reports about other religious schools. Salaries are low, but usually livable. Some religious schools do withhold salary until funds are available--that only happened to me during one pay period, but I've heard it regularly occurs at some schools. Workload varies; I've heard that some religious schools overload their teachers with excessive menial and trivial tasks that, if parents were truly concerned, could be done by volunteers; on the other hand, in other schools (such as the ones I've worked in), many of the extra tasks are readily done by both the teachers and the parents--most of these teachers and parents are highly dedicated. Some, if not most, U.S. religious schools provide excellent learning opportunities for the students, and some provide the worst possible learning environment (based on reports I've heard). So basically, it depends on each individual school. Organizations such as ACSI tend to provide individualized assistance to each of their schools to ensure a quality professional life for the teacher and a quality educational experience for the students. Professional development requirements also vary, but I do think ACSI puts a bit too much emphasis on religious studies for the teachers, requiring college level religious courses that could be more economically obtained (both time and money wise) through personal Bible study and church/Sunday School attendance; however, to their defense, they also provide free courses that may be audited by teachers at their conventions eventually leading up to the same required "hours" of coursework. Many religious school educators advance in their career to be come administrators or college level professors; many, such as myself, prefer to stay localized in the classroom; I never noticed a rush to move up the ladder (an American expression for advancing in a job situation). Most religious educators are more concerned with fulfilling a mission of education than personal enrichment; well, let me rephrase that. Most religious educators find personal enrichment in fulfilling their mission.
     
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  15. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Government is not a stakeholder in a private school setting, at least not in the US.
     
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  16. physteach

    physteach Companion

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    I don't do anything other than ask for them to match my previous salary? I"m good at what I do and come with glowing recommendations, but cannot take a pay cut. I worked about a year in public and used that as my original "I need you to match this, plus a bit, so I can take this job".
     
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  17. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May I ask what you teach?
     
  18. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I went from private (with a pay scale for which helped us qualify for our home in a high COL county) to public where I more than doubled my pay and provided for better professional and financial growth. I loved my tiny private Catholic school but they can't possibly compete fiscally. And they shouldn't have to. It's all about choices and opportunities.
     
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  19. physteach

    physteach Companion

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    I am certified in MS Science and Physics.
     
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  20. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May I ask what kind of private school you teach in?
     
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  21. physteach

    physteach Companion

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    I've taught in a couple of private schools, all non-religious.
     
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  22. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    It has been my experience that in private schools which are not religious in nature, science and math teachers are highly competitive with public school salaries as long as the candidate is savvy enough to ask for a salary that is competitive. Some of the other content areas are not as competitive, IMHO.
     
  23. burgandy01

    burgandy01 Rookie

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    I take a $10,000+ pay cut as opposed to public school pay. BUT the environment I teach in is heavenly! I get to focus on teaching and not red tape and I always have less than 10 students at a time.
     
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  24. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    I work at a private high school in California, make $55,000 a year, and am a fourth year teacher -- I'm 25. Concerning my education, I have a Bachelors degree in Mathematics, a Masters degree in Mathematics Education, and a Full Single Subject Preliminary teaching credential.

    I do not have a salary schedule at my school because salaries are negotiated on an individual basis with the principal and head of school. For example, every AP teacher (including myself) at the school was given a $6,000 raise and you receive an automatic raise when you complete your Masters ($3,000 to $4,000 raise) and teaching credential ($3,000 to $4,000 raise).

    I hope this helps.
     
  25. ChemTeachBHS

    ChemTeachBHS Comrade

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    I'm actually leaving public school to go teach at a private school in September. There are many reasons for my decision but money did factor in. I am getting a 25% raise at the private school.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2017
  26. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

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    Do you receive COL increases yearly?
     
  27. kaitydid

    kaitydid Rookie

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    Similar thing happened to me. I left public school to teach at a private Christian school for variety of reasons. Money was not a factor for me at all. I was so miserable that I was willing to take a pay cut as long as it was livable. I ended up making more money as a second-year teacher at my private school (about $3,000 more) than I would have by staying at the public school, and my benefits are just as good, if not better. That doesn't include the cost of living allowance my school gives me.
     
  28. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    No, the only way we would get annual COL increases would be if enroll went up year after year. However, if there is a surplus (there almost always is) we get a $1,000 bonus check at the end of the year and periodic cash gifts ($50, $100, etc.) throughout the year to show that we are appreciated.
     

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