Teachers - do you ever feel that you're "stuck" in the profession?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Davidfizix, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. Davidfizix

    Davidfizix Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2012

    As the saying goes, "Those who can't do, teach." That statement applies to me because I just don't have that many marketable skills to get a job in, say, Corporate America with a fortune 500 company. Plus, I'd have to know people to get a job like that. I contacted my former principle and she said she'd be glad to give me a good reference if I want to apply for a teaching job in the future.
    In the fall, I spent a month and a half in Albuquerque, NM. I really liked it, but then I went to Seattle to see if I liked that city any better. I didn't (sorry if you live in Seattle), so I'm moving back to Albuquerque at the end of this month. When I was there in the fall, I tried networking with different people (architects, office managers, pastors, etc.). After reviewing my resume, they all asked, "Why the heck don't you just a get a TEACHING job here in Albuquerque? Like at a charter school or something?" Then my resume probably went to the bottom of their pile. So, I feel I have no choice because teaching is the only experience I have on my resume - it is indeed VERY teaching-/education-oriented.
    Sure, there IS a demand for math teachers in Albuquerque (I used to teach German, but math is easier for me to teach and grade), but I may be at a disadvantage because I don't have current New Mexico Teacher Certification :unsure:. I'm hoping I can start off as a substitute teacher so I can get to know the school district, network with principals and inquire about alternative teacher certification programs. And then, if all goes well, get a job teaching math for the 2012-2013 school year.
    I've always heard the first year of teaching is the "worst," and then the second year is "exponentially better." I know now that I have to enforce the classroom rules and procedures starting DAY ONE. Don't be too lenient on the students, either. I plan to have a MUCH more organized classroom this time around, too. Plus, I love math! That's important, because I've heard of some math teachers who are only doing it "by default." And that's not good.
    Please don't comment on my previous issues. I'm NOT that person anymore. I'm an ADULT now, so I'll start THINKING like one.
    But still, does anyone else feel they're "stuck" in the teaching profession because they can't do anything else? I keep hearing about people who started off in a different profession and then switched to teaching, but what about the other way around? I don't know what else I can do.
     
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  3. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Jan 17, 2012

    The job market is fierce for every sector. If you want a job in corporate America, then you are going to have to be aggressive. Tailor your cover letters. Be ready to tell businesses why you want to work for them and how your skills as a teacher actually cross-apply to this job. Tell them why you would be an excellent candidate. Be passionate about chasing the job.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2012

    I know that I don't feel stuck in teaching, but a lady that I work with feels tied to her district. She has been teaching for 20 some years and knows that she cannot leave the district or she would lose quite a bit of her pay. However, she still loves teaching...so I'm not sure if it is really being stuck.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2012

    Well, for starters, I don't feel "stuck" because I love what I do. I feel honored and lucky that I'm able to do what I do all day.

    But if I did choose to get out of teaching, I think I have the skills to make my living elsewhere. I'm a decent writer (though you wouldn't always guess it to see my 5 am posts.) I have a decent enough math background that I could do a number of things... exactly what, I'm not sure. But I'm good at problem solving.

    As to a Fortune 500 company-- the economy is a mess. Those companies are, for the most part, not hiring. The people they are hiring are the people the headhunters bring to them-- people with a proven track record who can fill a niche. That's not about your teaching degree, that's about the economy. I have friends who worked for decades on the Stock and Commodities Exchanges who have been out of work for a good year and a half. My brother in law, in CA, spent his career with the phone company and has been out of work for about as long.

    Additionally, I'm not sure too many math teachers have to "default" to teaching; a math degree can open lots of doors to places other than the classroom.

    But as to getting a job for the upcoming school year: there are tens of thousands of certified teachers out of work. Every single one of them has a better shot at a job than someone who is uncertified. If you want to teach in New Mexico, get certified in New Mexico.
     
  6. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jan 17, 2012

    My dad feels the same way about his district. He loves teaching, but he's stuck in a district he hates. It's not even about taking a pay cut, it's the fact that no one will hire a teacher with two masters degrees and more than 20 years of experience. The area my parents live in is crazy, crazy saturated with applicants- when they can get quality "newbies" for 50,000 less, he doesn't have a chance. He also has tenure which he feels like isn't something he should give up in this economy even if he could. As for me, no I don't feel "stuck." If I ever wanted to go into another field, I'd expect that I'd need to get the degree/training in that field- isn't it like that for any job? If someone in the corporate world wants to be a teacher, they have to jump through all the hoops to get certified to teach, so it goes both ways.
     
  7. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jan 17, 2012

    No, I love teaching and am definitely not stuck. When I first read your post I thought you had been teaching for quite some time. By the time I got near the end of it, it sounded more like you don't actually have that much teaching experience after all, so I'm not quite sure why you feel stuck. If you aren't happy teaching, then look into another field. I know that's easier said than done, but if you are not happy teaching then it might be worth looking into.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2012

    I don't feel stuck. I love what I do and where I do it. I do have other marketable skills, however. I have an undergrad degree in business, have worked in marketing, customer service, advertising, and taught a grad class as an adjunct.
     
  9. isabunny

    isabunny Comrade

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    Jan 19, 2012

    One job available for teachers in the corporate world is to be a Trainer. Many companies need Training Instructors or Orientation Leaders to educate new employees.
     
  10. BB0211

    BB0211 Companion

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    Jan 20, 2012

    Yes, I know how you feel. I felt stuck in my old district...well, more like I was stagnating. For the most part I liked the district, yet there wasn't a lot of support to implement programs effectively. Consequently, we always felt like we were chasing a new unattainable goal. (not a good incentive for your employees)

    It also was an hour+ communte everyday, sometimes 2 hours home...not ok in my book.

    I resigned before my tenure year(in that district) and am now searching elsewhere.

    It's HARD to find a job. I have an interview for a maternity leave cover that I know 2 other candidates are interviewing for as well. Fingers crossed for that, yet I know they don't have openings yet for Fall. So...I guess you just give it yor best. If it works out it will work out. The hunt continues! What else can you do?

    Also, get certified. No excuses. Do it within the next month.
     
  11. miamibeet

    miamibeet Rookie

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    Jan 20, 2012

    I agree with Davidfizix. :clap:

    Most companies and organizations outside of education look at anyone who has been working in education for all or most of their professional life as one thing....teachers.

    Anyone who works in a school buidling whether it's teacher, counselor, media specialist or principal get seen as a teacher. Once
    they have assessed you as a teacher all consideration goes out the door.

    They don't always realize that we have great transferable skills. :mad:They dont realize that we dont "work" with children...we "service" children. Our faculty meetings, lesson planing and collaborations all are done with other adults. The outside world does not see this. They visual the teacher working with students all day and don't feel like we go really bring anything to their organization.

    And, in this era of quick resume glances and no visible contact you rarely get the time to "sell yourself" to anyone. So they glance over your resume see you worked in a school for several years or more and toss it. Not always, but too often in my opinion.
     
  12. Davidfizix

    Davidfizix Rookie

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    Feb 29, 2012

    I feel stuck because I can't find anything else! Here in Albuquerque, even a TEMP AGENCY turned me down because my resume is too "teacher-oriented." I submitted my substitute teacher application for Albuquerque Public Schools, and I'm supposed to hear back from them by March 10th. I'm starting to remember all the horror stories about teaching, and I'm SO scared! I'm more mature than I was the first time around, but schools can be tough these days! I've heard in some schools in Albuquerque, almost every (male) student is a member of this gang or that gang. I need to be a brave man to be teaching here, I suppose.

    You know, I watched this video on YouTube about being a CIA operative, and the narrator said there are people (spies) who are wanting to LEAVE the CIA (because being a spy wasn't what they thought it was or they must've seen too many James Bond movies growing up), but then the agency tries everything in its power to KEEP the spy in the agency by convincing him/her that "clandestine operations" is the ONLY thing in the world he/she is capable of. Almost the same idea here. Because of my resume/background/experience, many employers seem convinced that teaching/education is the only thing I'M capable of. :eek::confused::unsure:

    Soooo....I can either be homeless, on the streets, going across town for different meals, sleep under a bridge, face the weather and risk being victimized/killed ORRRR I can have a job (math teacher) with steady pay, and hence an apartment, car, and vacation time (particularly in the summer) to take road trips or go back "home" to Germany! And at the same time, contribute to society by inspiring students to "go the extra mile" and succeed in life and NOT resort to gangs, drugs and the like. I feel I can do it, but it'll take some time (a few years) to really perfect the art of teaching.
     
  13. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Feb 29, 2012

    I hadn't considered possible pitfalls of a "teacher-oriented" resume. Perhaps that's because it took me until I was 36 to start teaching full time and I had a full resume from that. However, I would think that teachers would, in general, be welcome in any customer service office. We know how to listen to questions and break down instructions. In reverse, it was my time in the private sector in customer service that helped me secure teaching interviews. Hopefully, a resume rewrite might work for teachers wanting to get other kinds of work.
     
  14. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    Feb 29, 2012

    I think there are pitfalls to a "teacher-oriented" resume. Even though my degree is not in education, I do think that it would be hard for me to find a job in my field because most of my resume would scream education. My friends who majored in the same thing as me did internships in that field. Most of my volunteering in college was in education.
    However, I love teaching, so I don't feel stuck at all.
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Feb 29, 2012

    For starters, you haven't done all THAT much teaching as I recall-- it's not like you've been at this for decades.

    If your resume is too teacher oriented, REWRITE YOUR RESUME. Choose to concentrate on those aspects of your background that can translate to other fields.

    You've dealt with instruction, so talk about educating adults. You've dealt with people, talk about customer service.
    You're good at math--this translates to financial fields, insurance, and a lot of other fields.
    Aren't you blingual?? I seem to recall you teaching German???

    Lots of people have left teaching and not ended up homeless; I'm really not sure I buy your philosophy that "Soooo....I can either be homeless, on the streets, going across town for different meals, sleep under a bridge, face the weather and risk being victimized/killed ORRRR I can have a job (math teacher) with steady pay, and hence an apartment, car, and vacation time (particularly in the summer) to take road trips or go back "home" to Germany!"

    You don't see just a LITTLE bit of over dramatization there??? Like there are no other jobs in the world than teaching??? You couldn't, for example, work in retail to avoid being homeless? Work in the Post Office? ANYTHING??????

    mmswm left a decades-long career as a math teacher and has since enjoyed a successful career in banking.
     
  16. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Feb 29, 2012

    I'm not stuck.
    I love what I do.
    I'm currently taking a grad class called "Writing for the Profession" (and, the profession is not teaching) and it is a cake-walk class for me because I already do these things. It has shown me how truly marketable I am if I ever did leave the teaching field.
     
  17. bison

    bison Habitué

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    Feb 29, 2012

    :yeahthat:


    There are other jobs out there, it just sounds like you might just be reaching too high or you need to work on your resume writing skills. Teachers have skills that are marketable in other areas, but they need to be advertised on a resume, just like anything else. Keep in mind that the economic downturn has impacted other fields besides education, you can't just pick out a new job and find it immediately. If you feel you don't have the skills employers are looking for, go out there and get them. Take some classes, volunteer, take lower paying jobs, do what you need to do.
     
  18. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Feb 29, 2012

    Isn't this the same penchant for overdramatization that got you into trouble here before??
     
  19. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 29, 2012

    David...so many of your threads have a concerning tone...have you considered seeking some help from a professional for dealing with your stress and frustration?
     
  20. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Feb 29, 2012

    How can you not? As a teacher, your waking life is basically consumed with teaching and preparing (grading, planning)... and when/if you do have time after work hours, many teachers are working on advanced degrees in education (that will move them along in the salary scale), or adding certifications to their teaching credential.

    You barely have time to read books of pleasure!

    So you are absolutely right, in that teachers do feel "trapped". Of course, most enjoy what they do, so trapped isn't the word. For teachers who are beyond reproach (i.e. high on the seniority scale), of course they're going to give you the shpeel how they aren't trapped, etc. For a large section of teachers though... the ones who every year, put their "blood, sweat, and tears" on the line--yet have to sweat being on the chopping block year after year... it is a fact!

    You want to tell the district who continues to undervalue/disrespect your service and commitment by issuing you a pink slip for said services--that you have other options. But the fact is, you don't! In that sense, you are trapped. ou want to say, "Oh, you don't want me? I'll go elsewhere!", like that spurned GF/BF. But there is nowhere to go. You are tied to your disrespectful district who doesn't value you, with your bozo superintendent, the frazzled looking P who lacks any real leadership (who's only qualification for being a "Principal" is an advanced degree of some sort)... and that's the bottom line.
     
  21. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Feb 29, 2012

    I would think that if you word the resume right the employer would see all the trainings you have already gotten from working in education. Years of management of people who have no work experience and making them work anyway. Years of creative development of plans. On the spot restructuring plans do to on the spot reassessments of needs. Organization of huge amounts of things (kind of like juggling way too many things at once and succeeding). Getting those lazy, sad, depressed, spacy, spring fevered, angry... workers all working and producing while the workers receive no pay for their work! For years! How many managers can claim that? Rescuing many from their worst moment (well, a 6 year olds worst moment may not seem like much to an adult; but, wow, is a big deal if you are 6). Getting hundreds of people to do their best work every day. Getting them to come back and try again no matter how frustrating or hopeless it might have seemed the day before. Getting people who do not want to even be around each other to work together on a regular basis and not strangle each other. Giving emotional support several times on any day. Just to list a few qualities most teachers who have taught for a few years share.
     
  22. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Feb 29, 2012

    It's tough, but it is possible to find jobs even if your resume is very "teacher oriented" (it's just a lot of work... in this economy, there aren't a whole lot of jobs to go around). I went to a career counselor at the university I attended a few months ago. She helped me to rework and reword my resume so it was less teacher and more oriented to a general professional business. Then, I would just need to go through and personalize the resume a bit more for the job that I was applying to.

    It's hard though. I applied a few non teaching jobs and never was given an opportunity to interview. I was told by the career counselor to volunteer and gain connections through that way. I just don't have the time to volunteer due to my other jobs.

    I'm lucky to have my afterschool program job.

    I feel stuck because I can't even find a full time teaching job in this area. If I can't teach, then what else can I do?

    So, yes, I feel stuck right now.
     
  23. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Mar 1, 2012

    I feel you. My spouse is military and we are living overseas now. The only available jobs are on base. I wanted to do something other than teaching, but if you want to make more than $10 a hour it is hard. I've been turned down because I don't have enough "management" jobs in my background. WTF? It's really hard to make my teaching experience (and I'm a newbie too) translate into something else. Or I'm just not finding the right job that it translates into. There aren't a whole lot of options, so I'm back subbing. It's really frustrating.
     
  24. Davidfizix

    Davidfizix Rookie

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    Mar 1, 2012

    Well, yes, I do need to be a lot more careful about what I post on the Internet because you just never know who'll read it! But it was really my anger problem that got me in trouble before, and I still do have an anger problem to this day. I'm just chronically angry and don't know why. Having said that, NOT ONCE have I ever lost my temper or blown up in front of studdents! I always kept my cool in a classroom. It's just AFTER the school day that I let all my anger out. I just don't know what to do. It's the same situation here in Albuquerque. What am I going to do on that INEVITABLE day that a student is being pretty irritating? I'll let it slip and move on with the day, but I might get angry later on.

    I honestly think if I just go out there, meet new people, make new friends (I have to remember students are NOT my friends - ever!) and maybe meet some nice women (who may want to get intimate with me) - then I won't be so angry all the time and quality of life will improve. It's the beginning of March and school starts mid-August here in Albuquerque. That gives me five and a half months to get my social life in order.
     
  25. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Mar 1, 2012

    That may have been the issue elsewhere.

    What got you into trouble here was the fact that you threatened suicide, then came back and said you had been crying wolf. People here who worried about the safety of a stranger were understandably less than appreciative of the joke.

    It sounds to me as though counseling is in order. Please don't look to anyone else to solve your issues for you. The right relationship comes about AFTER you've gotten your house in order, not as a means to that end.
     
  26. bison

    bison Habitué

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    It's not a good idea to get in a relationship when you have anger issues to resolve. All it will do is result in an unhealthy situation that is potentially unsafe. A good counselor would be able to help you figure out some techniques to manage and control your anger, as well as not let minor things impact you so deeply. That way you can find a career you're happy in, build healthy relationships, and live a more peaceful life.
     
  27. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    When I went into teaching, I made a vow to myself-- if I ever really hated my job, I'd quit. Because not only would it make me insane, it'd be a complete disservice to the kids! I've had the teachers that don't want to teach, and their classes were always awful. I want to be enthusiastic. If one day I don't have that same enthusiasm, I'll find something else.
     
  28. TeachOn

    TeachOn Habitué

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    Yeah, I love what I do. I love the kids; I love my subject matter. I respect and admire the teachers I work with.

    I've done other work - advertizing, technical writing, maple sugaring, tree work, etc.: they were all comparably dull (or cold or strenuous). I wouldn't mind returning to technical writing, though, which can be challenging in interesting ways. No more tree work for these old bones, however, and I wouldn't be worth my pay now working in the woods.

    As for you, David, I don't think you're ready for a job as challenging as teaching. I don't think either that "meeting nice women who may want to get intimate with you" is the answer. If you were a student or a friend of mine, I'd be a little worried about you. I too hope that you will seek counseling, which really can help.
     
  29. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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  30. greendream

    greendream Cohort

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    Honestly, I do feel trapped, but not the the way that most people are saying. I just feel trapped in my building--in my classroom. I'm very envious of people who have jobs that allow them to go out for lunch or run errands during the day or even just step outside for some air. With teaching, I get claustrophobic because I'm anchored to the room for at least 6 hours a day.
     
  31. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Have you thought about counseling?

    There is NOTHING wrong with counseling. I'm not embarrassing to say that I started seeing a therapist in January. Too many things have been going on in my life and it's been really wonderful talking to someone and getting their advice, view points, etc on how to work through these issues.

    I am finally starting to feel this heavy weight being lifted off my shoulders.

    I go every other week (mainly to save money). It's definitely worth it.
     
  32. Davidfizix

    Davidfizix Rookie

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    Mar 3, 2012

    True, I am starting to get a little worried about MYSELF! Sure, I would LOVE a desk job with a German company where I can speak/translate Deutsch (German) every day, but as Aliceacc mentioned, "Those companies just aren't hiring right now." I mean, I know Denver is only a 7-8 hour drive from Albuquerque, and there are lots of Germans and a few German companies in Denver, but I DOUBT Denver has a lack of people skilled in the German language. I've tried counseling countless times, and it just doesn't work. One of them told me it's okay to flip off motorcyclists who don't wear helmets (I've stopped that habit, thankfully, no thanks to that therapist!) and another was an expat German and I ended up using the therapy hour as a "practice my German" hour, which was fine and dandy, but that didn't help with my issues. A few weeks ago in Albuquerque, I went to a counselor. I was angry and banging on things BEFORE the session, and then AFTER the session, I was even angrier to the point that I got unwanted attention from security! Good gosh. You and I both have reason to be concerned.
     
  33. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Mar 3, 2012

    A few thoughts:
    We are not your therapists, but you raise enough concern that you have been well advised to seek help. Your posts dating back to October of 2009 have been desperate calls for help in which you have discussed suicide, isolation and anger. Find some help that works for you.

    It's a tough economy. All jobs are highly competitive. Education in some regions has historically been a tough market, even more so now. There are many in education who still find passion, motivation and fulfillment in this profession. There are tough districts, but even those need great teachers...unfortunately great teachers can get worn down by negative work conditions...in your fragile state, this may not be the best career choice for you at his time...for your sake, as well as the students.

    Business is also highly competitive. You may have some specialized language skills...capitalize on those. Do know that you will be in competition with others who also have excellent multi-lingual skills, as well as experience coupled with strong social skills, business acumen and overall 'balance'.

    Dating...competitive as well. Sex can be found anywhere. If you are looking for a real relationship, you really need to look within and deal with your issues before putting all that baggage on someone else.

    I wish you well, the next move is yours. Good luck to you. Be well.
     
  34. Davidfizix

    Davidfizix Rookie

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    Mar 10, 2012

    Sorry to keep posting here, and I know some of you might be getting tired of me, but writing here also helps ME personally, because I can always go back and reread what I was thinking earlier (while trying to save the environment by not using paper...BUT when I post here everyone reads it....well, others have said posting in forums IS like writing a diary, only difference is, everyone can read it!). I once read a forum (on an unrelated site) about someone in retail who didn't want to go to work on Black Friday because she was "anxious about the crowds of shoppers." (or something like that; I have to paraphrase because it's been a while and forums come and go.) This is what one person said, which can be applied to my situation:
    "You're anxious about crowds on Black Friday? [Or in my case: David, are you anxious about teaching math to teenagers in a (supposedly tough) school district?] Well, you don't know what REAL "anxiety" is until you lose your home, can't afford to gas your car, go for days between meals, have no way to do laundry, can't find a job anywhere else, and are frequently beaten and abused." (I don't remember it all, so that's a very loose paraphrase) Let's face it: There are NO JOBS in the US right now, EXCEPT for math and science teachers. Those who can't do, teach. I myself can't do anything else.
    I'm a Joel Osteen follower, and he keeps saying, "Our God is a God of the impossible." (Okay, I know this is not a religious forum, so I won't go into details.) I know God has great plans for me and he'll "take me to places I've never even dreamed of." (quoting Osteen). Think about all that had to happen for me to get my first teaching job:
    1) It was the peak of the recession ('09), so teaching jobs were pretty scarce to start off with.
    2) I was living in Virginia with my parents but applying for jobs in Texas because that's where I took an alternative certification course. I had to find a principal who was willing to interview (and then hire) me over the phone (most principals, or any employer for that matter, would prefer to meet candidates in person before officially hiring).
    3) I was mostly only qualified to teach German. A German teacher had to leave at just the right time (when I applied, that is).
    4) The principal was willing to hire me out of state. Many principals (and again, employers in general) prefer to only hire local candidates. However, it could be she could not find any local candidates who knew German.

    I'm sure there are other factors, but Osteen and I are in agreement when we say this was truly the work of the Almighty God. Okay, enough religious stuff. I know how this pattern works:

    1) I feel I don't like my teaching job or I'm not "fit" enough for it mentally, so I go to A to Z Teacher Stuff and express my emotions (which did me great harm, unfortunately).
    2) Teachers on here say that I'm not meant for teaching, and that I need to get out of the profession and do something else, ANYthing else.
    3) I counteract that and say, "I can do it if I just hang in there a little while longer."
    4) Teachers will then say I need a counselor/therapist and a psychiatrist because I have an "illness that needs to be treated." Let me just make this clear: I am not bipolar or psychotic or otherwise mentally incapacitated/unstable. If anything, I just have an attitude/anger problem that can be solved by Amazon's WONDERFUL selection of anger management/self-help books.

    I don't know what I expect to accomplish by writing this. I am currently doing online training for substitute teaching. I was a substitute teacher before (in Tampa, FL) and it was NOT that bad, sometimes even FUN and REWARDING! No matter what, I will not take what the students do to me personally. If they end up treating me badly, that's how they would treat ANY substitute teacher who walks into their classroom.
     
  35. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Mar 10, 2012

    I know you based only on your posts on this forum. If you are actually voicing your emotions...then I feel you are a loose canon and you should not be in any classroom. I was one of the posters who recommended counseling a couple of years ago and I don't think a book on Amazon will help you. If it were that easy, you wouldn't be continuing to express all these negative emotions. (I'm only bringing up the past because you did.)
    You admitted yourself that you haven't found the right counselor. Please keep on looking. You might also try to see a job coach type counselor who may be able to steer you in a direction you may not have thought about to utilize the talents you have.
    If it helps you to write here, keep doing it. We will continue to offer what advice we have, but, it won't be sugar coated (and it won't be mean, either).
     
  36. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Mar 10, 2012

    Kids need and deserve a teacher who IS "fit enough for it mentally."
     
  37. lovebeingteach

    lovebeingteach Companion

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    Mar 10, 2012

    No!!!!!!!! There are so many things you can do with a teaching degree. Try case management or social work. I did, and I RAN back to teaching. lol I missed it so much, but I am very glad that I took the 2 years to try something else.
     
  38. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Mar 10, 2012

    David...you have discussed suicide. Generally it takes more than books from Amazon to fix that. We can't fix what ails you, but students deserve more than a teacher who is not 'fit for it mentally' or who has 'attitude/anger issues'. Get help or don't. Just don't teach in your current mental state. It's not good for anyone involved, including you.:2cents:
     
  39. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Mar 18, 2012

    I'm in a different position in the schools other than a teacher & a brand new position at that, so I personally don't feel stuck. I just started my journey & I'm in it for the long haul. I know there's days when the work day's over & as I'm leaving to go home, I'm thinking to myself, "I'm liking this job more & more" & I'm so glad I'm feeling this way. I'm still an intern, so it's hard to LOVE something you're just starting to learn about, but as I'm learning more & more, I'm liking it more & more.

    I sure hope you find your niche in life & attain the happiness you're seeking.
     
  40. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Mar 18, 2012

    Being a teacher means you are in charge of children. You are to educate them; but let's face it, education is so much more than teaching them math, or science or whatever. Teachers have a great impact on the kids, positive or negative.
    I don't think "I can do it if I just hang in there a little while longer" will do it. Kids can be tough at any age.

    I have a student who is constantly pushing my buttons. He is never, ever quiet (he'll talk to anyone sitting next to him, if there's no one, he'll talk to himself), he'll look at at me every 2 minutes to see if I'm looking at him; if I am, he'll stare back at me defiantly, as in saying "why are you looking at me?". He constantly challenges me, complains about me, he just had a meeting with the principal about me. Some days he walks in, and says "this Fxxxing class!!", or the first thing coming out of his mouth is "can I talk to the principal? or anyone, higher than you??". He says this class is the only one he has trouble in, (in reality he's the nightmare of every class)

    Some days he really frustrates me, but most of the time I stick to my plan and discipline him accordingly. I often let him go to far, which means he is still sent out and has consequences, but by that time he annoyed everyone in the classroom, including me. When this happens, I drive home a little annoyed, feeling like I have failed in some way. But I go home, not think about it, and the next day I'm ready to do what I need to. Even now, Saturday night, I feel like all those frustrations are so far away.
    But it's because I have very thick skin and I don't let things get to me.

    If a teacher has anger issues, unsolved emotional problems, I don't see how they could deal with something like this. And this kid is not the worst you can have. You need to take care of yourself, before you can take care of someone else.
     
  41. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Mar 19, 2012

    I do love what I do but I also feel a little stuck just at this moment. I think I could do a lot of other things if I wanted to, but it would take a lot of investment - time and effort in getting started, money either invested or lost because of starting at a lower level in something new. And I am the main supporter of my growing young family still trying to re-build some savings after having recently completed my master's degree. So when I ponder what my next step is and I consider both teaching and non-teaching options, I do feel stuck with the teaching. Not stuck in a depressing way because I do like it, but yes, I am limited. I might want to pursue a related career like educational administration sometime in the future, but for now I don't have the time and resources to get another degree for that.
     

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