TeacherFit or Teacher Insight... thoughts?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by teachinIA4137, May 26, 2014.

  1. teachinIA4137

    teachinIA4137 Rookie

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    May 26, 2014

    So I'm new to the application game this year and I've noticed a few of my districts I've applied to use this "TeacherFit" or "Teacher Insight" profiling 'quiz'. It seems incredibly arbitrary and frankly not a great measure of a candidate's worth in the classroom (At one of the seminars we were required to attend during student teaching, the head HR person of one school district** flat-out said he never hired anyone who didn't score above an 8 on this test).

    These things just seem ridiculous, and I understand it's to 'weed out' some candidates, but come on! Anyone feel the same or have a counter point that maybe gives these ridiculous tests some justification?



    **NOTE: This guy was incredibly cocky and put many of us ST's off from applying to his district with his 'holier than thou' attitude. Plus I've heard some people describe the town and school district as 'Stepford Wives'-like and manic with competition, not something I'd really look for in a school district/community!
     
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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I had to take the Teacher Insight thing at one district. I have no idea whatsoever what my score was. I pretty much just picked the first answer that popped into my head. The district hired me, so I must not have done too poorly.
     
  4. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    I think I've taken one before. Basically, they ask the same question several times to see if it really is your point of view. It didn't seem difficult. I just answered with my honest opinion. I just noticed they asked the same questions several times in different ways.
     
  5. ozzy1011

    ozzy1011 Rookie

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    I think they're terrible. The Teacher Insight screener is far easier than the TeacherFit that I took for my dream district. It's pretty clear that the Gallup test wants you to say that you're just the best, most interesting, most patient, and innovative person that any of your friends know. Is this necessarily true about every solid teacher candidate? Of course not, which is why the test is arbitrary. I don't think it's a true indicator of teaching success.

    The TeacherFit screener was worse for me because several questions had me choose to rate the likelihood of my responses to hypothetical situations. I had to rate each response by checking off a point on sliding scale between extremely likely and extremely unlikely. The problem is, I didn't see any answers that reflect what I would actually do in those situations, and so they all looked like bad choices to me.
     
  6. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I've only taken the Insight test at one district. I wasn't offered an interview after three attempts. A friend of a friend, however, was told HIS Insight results sealed the deal getting him an interview, and he was hired. They're looking for a particular mindset I don't share with them.
     
  7. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    May 27, 2014

    I've had to take it (or something similar) probably close to 10 times this interview season. One of them had some really weird questions: about whether or not you cuss, cross the street against a light, cut people in line, etc.

    I've had interviews for a few places that required it, so I must have done ok.
     
  8. teachinIA4137

    teachinIA4137 Rookie

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    They do seem like something I found in other service industry fields. It's really silly to reduce someone's capabilities to a score. Also I'd love to see how I do on them! They never tell you.
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I hate them. One of my most frustrating questions was about what strategy you'd use for a student with a certain problem. I was reading them and thought "I might try all of these! And others! How am I supposed to pick one?!"
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    May 28, 2014

    This is how I learned to "game" this assessment also. When I first took it I thought they might be looking for more realistic/humble answers. Many of the questions say something like, "I'm the most positive person I know" or "I'm more honest than anyone I know" or "Teachers are more important than other professionals" "All of my students will like me," etc. It seems kind of absurd to basically say that you're perfect in every way and much better than everyone else you know, but that's apparently what they're looking for. I didn't start "passing" this for interviews until I started answering that way. Teacher Insight or some other type of assessment has been part of almost every application (out of hundreds) that I've ever filled out.

    My other favorite is the Haberman "star teacher" test, which is common in high poverty districts around here. It's supposed to test your ability to be successful with an inner city population. The thing about that one is you can look up the book and see what the test is based on/what they're looking for. The "right" answers on the test definitely did not at all math the districts philosophies who required it (and they required a certain score to even be considered for a position). For example, one of the huge elements in it that they ask about over and over again is that you grade based on effort and not based on mastery. I don't know of any district around here that would advocate for giving grades based on effort rather than mastery in practice, so why are they including this test as part of their interviews?
     
  11. ozzy1011

    ozzy1011 Rookie

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    Fortunately, I rocked the Haberman because I found his old article on teacher burnout and it reveals his philosophy on every domain covered by the test.

    The funny thing is, the district using it around here is not a high poverty district at all; in fact, it's quite the opposite. They require every potential hire to take it and only pick the top scorers.

    In addition to grading by effort, I also thought it was interesting that a district with such bureaucratic administrative policies would endorse a test which blames teacher burnout on bureaucratic administrative policies.
     
  12. Mr D

    Mr D Comrade

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    May 28, 2014

    This. There are also some where I wouldn't have done any of them.
     
  13. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    These insulting "quizzes" like TeacherFit shouldn't be allowed in districts. You aren't even allowed to see how you scored.

    You spend all of this money, all of this time, to get certified and may even have years of experience, but if you don't answer those idiotic questions a particular way, you get screened out.

    Teachers are professionals, not retail workers.
     
  14. texashistory

    texashistory Rookie

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    So if your results have been successfully sent to the HR screening committee of the district with 10 metrics does that mean you passed?

    I really don't like surveys like that. I don't like weed out surveys either. I swear 4 questions had grammatical typos.

    I did the Haberman one for HISD and the "principal asks you to stop" whatever you're doing kept tripping me up.

    I know HISD is rigorous on state testing. I've heard that from parents and teachers but the idea of just stopping something already in progress didn't sit well with me and IMO doesn't show a good impression of a teacher. Respecting the authority of the principal yes but no good teacher does any lesson for fluff so there is some reasoning behind it that just may spark something on the standardize test.

    If I failed it I know it's probably due to that question. I don't think I once selected immediate stop because the principal tells you to.
     
  15. atxteacher

    atxteacher Rookie

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    I took one for many districts here in Austin... I have my certification and have applied for every job I find AND have emailed the principals a cover letter and resume... no interest at all in me. Not sure how I could have failed but not sure why I am not being looked at... I have my Masters and ESL cert. :-(
     
  16. texashistory

    texashistory Rookie

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    What was your score? They don't give anything concrete or explain what your number means.
     
  17. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    I took a class as part of my psychology minor on industrial psychology, and most of the class was about these types of tests. I have found that I just have to figure out what they are going for, them it's easy to skew the results in my favor.

    Sad really that they can be beat so easily, yet are held on such high esteem.
     
  18. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    I answered the same way....could explain why I haven't heard from them. That isn't the optimal response to that question, but they could have set their own criteria.......stupid criteria......but still their choice
     
  19. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    On the Haberman for the principal asking you to stop ones, the right answer is the one that says you show your principal why it's being effective/explain your reasoning or something like that (it's been a couple of years, so I don't remember the exact wording).
     
  20. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    Well okay then, my instinct was right, because that is how I answered. Wonder why they haven't called?
     
  21. atxteacher

    atxteacher Rookie

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    The one I took says you do not get any results and you can not retake it for 12 months.
     
  22. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    Well, I think interviews are generally a terrible predictor of teaching effectiveness, so I guess a multiple choice test isn't much worse.
     
  23. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    :yeahthat:
     
  24. texashistory

    texashistory Rookie

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    That was years ago so maybe it's still true. Or they changed the criteria and now that's not the right answer. I felt like that was the most important question because it popped up every 4 question or so.
     
  25. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    I had this question during my superintendent interview for my previous district, and I answered with go to the principal and explain. She later told me I was one of the few that answered the question correctly.

    My class, way back in the day, mentioned questions like this as a test of whether an employee would be willing to go to the boss with questions and concerns, and willing to work with them.

    But of course, we all now principals who think once they get that job think they have ascended the throne and expected to be worshiped and adored and above all else obeyed.
     

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