Teacher Unions

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ninamricci, Aug 18, 2019.

  1. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 25, 2019

    Again, this is true sometimes but not always. The needier the district, the more room for negotiation. You live in Alaska, where I presume it could be difficult to find qualified teachers in some areas. Where I live, we have more than enough teachers to go around. They offer you what is on the salary schedule, take it or leave it. Sometimes they won’t even give you full credit for your years of experience on the salary schedule if you’ve been teaching for a long time. My current district only matches up to 10 years. When I moved to Chicago, I could only get credit for two years experience even though I had been teaching for six. School board policy very clearly laid out that negotiation beyond two years experience was not an option. You showed proof for how many years you had been teaching and your degrees, and they told you what they’d pay you. Simple as that.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2019
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  2. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Aug 25, 2019

    They only honored 2 years?! Yeah, I wouldn’t work there (no offense). In CA, it is standard for districts to accept up to 10 years or more and the lowest I’ve seen is 5 years.
     
  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 25, 2019

    It was still more money than I had been making in another region with a lower cost of living. I was irritated but accepted it because I wanted to live there, and, dollar for dollar, it was a raise. But I didn’t stay there long anyway. Long story, but it ended up with me moving back to where I had come from after only one year. I still don’t make as much money now as I did there, even though I’m now getting full credit for my years of experience.
     
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  4. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Comrade

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    Aug 30, 2019

    Bella, I live in the spot of AK where I think most Alaskans would want to live if they could find employment and afford housing. The district I work in often has hundreds of applicants for 1 job. I live outside of a college town that pumps out teachers.
    It is kind of a touristy area with beautiful scenery. Mostly tourists are around here in the summer. I live down a road with 7 houses. 5 of them are only used as summer homes. The people go to Hawaii or Arizona usually for winter.There are very few kids for the large area. So that is not the case here. There are many places that are off the road system in AK that are like you describe though.
    Most AK teachers will not even go out to many of the places because of nightmare stories we've heard from teachers who have. lol I do know a couple of big men who liked to hunt and fish who liked it out in the bush. They have to recruit in the lower 48 for teachers. Anyways, I can only imagine how they negotiate in bush AK. :) They'd have to promise me more than I could ever imagine to go out there. :)
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 31, 2019

    I think it’s all relative. The area you have described that you live in is still vastly different than the mid-size metropolitan area where I live. There is nothing comparable to the bush/off-road area you’ve described here. My guess is that our population of teachers here is still far more than what you have there. We have multiple colleges and universities local to us, plus many additional that are not more than a few hours drive away. We have so many applicants for teaching jobs that some of the larger more equipped districts do video or phone recorded screening interviews that may or may not even involve meeting with a human. I’m not suggesting that it’s difficult to find teachers where you live, but I am saying that it’s all relative and obviously different in various parts of the country. Negotiating steps on a salary schedule or other benefits is very rare here, at best. The supply simply exceeds the demand, So districts have no need to negotiate and will just move on to the next candidate.
     
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  6. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Comrade

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    Aug 31, 2019

    Yes, we are definitely in different worlds. I came from a pretty big city and grew up in 1 before moving here. Our population in this area is mostly people with grown children. I'd guess 40 is the average age. Children move to cities when they grow up because there is really only 1 route to excellent employment around here and you have to be inclined towards it and know someone well to get hired. ( North Slope- oil, chemists, engineers, specialists in specific areas.) They still have to fly to work...lol ( helicopter or small plane)
    Our schools have declined in enrollment like you would not imagine. As the economy gets worse, I notice a trend of grandkids coming back for periods of times. That helps our school stay open. They are talking about shutting some schools down and consolidating in our district due to lack of enrollment here. I know a huge group ( gym rats ( 30's to 40's) who work on the slope and they don't have kids. They have dogs instead. Probably 1 out of 10 that I know have kids instead of dogs! Less responsibility...but they love their dogs like most of us love our kids....It may just be a trend here. I am not sure.
    There are some schools in the bush w/ only 10 kids, but that is allowed in the bush. I am sure you have way more teachers there. We have a ton of under employed or unemployed ones here. Many have given up looking and have settled into other "helping professions." The new teachers have to go to Anchorage or other states to get experience. They do not hire them here unless they are related to someone who has clout! When negotiating came up though, I remember a P they really wanted from the lower states and they made a job for his wife. Then a teacher whose husband slid into a special job that he wasn't qualified for, but it paid big bucks. Someone really liked her. To negotiate for housing and flights, you have to be in the bush. But, I have known some teachers ( handful) who did negotiate the step they came in on because most of us have lots of experience by the time we get here. It is just really different in different places. :)
     

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