Teacher treasure chest display

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by TeachCafe, Jul 19, 2018.

  1. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    Jul 19, 2018

    Two years ago, I found the cutest pirate's chest Michael's. I have always kept it in my classroom teacher closet which can be locked but I have never locked it and have never had anyone go in it without permission.

    This past year, for a split second I thought of displaying it as a visual reminder but then I caught wind of some extreme sticky fingers (taking money from teacher purses) so I locked it up.

    I will have built in shelves this year and I'm thinking of displaying it on a taller shelf. This past year for that split second I didn't think of my own students possibly trying to get to it but other students that pass by and see it

    If you have one of these, do you display it in your room or not? What are your pros and cons?
     
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  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 19, 2018

    I don't use a treasure chest or anything like that anymore, but, when I did previously, I usually kept things out on the shelves where kids could (but weren't supposed to) access. I had a problem with something being stolen maybe once or twice. It wasn't really a big deal because I didn't keep anything expensive in there, and it didn't happen often. I no longer use one because it just doesn't fit with my philosophy on classroom management anymore, but my decision had nothing to do with stolen items or anything like that.
     
  4. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    Will you explain what you do now and what you mean by this?

    I'm at a PBIS school and I like it for a cash in on "bucks" choice and it works for my table points.
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Sure... I have a special education background, so I used to have a strong belief in a token economy system of classroom management. I don't have anything against it in the right setting or for the right student; it just doesn't align to my beliefs anymore. I'm at a school that focuses on restorative practices and building relationships, so I don't use any sort of extrinsic motivators anymore. Truthfully, I made the switch even before changing schools, but now my philosophy and the school philosophy (mostly) align.

    If you're at a PBIS school, then a treasure chest probably fits in very nicely. I was at PBIS-inspired schools back when I used one. I had "bucks" too, and the students could earn them and then spend them on prizes. After I did away with the treasure chest and bucks, I switched to a clip chart, but that didn't really sit well with me either. So, I stopped doing anything extrinsic the year before I started working at my current school, and I haven't gone back. For one thing, I think it really does help to foster better relationships between students and teachers. For another, it's SO much easier to not have to worry about prizes, bucks, clips, etc. Everything is all about respect, responsibility, empathy, etc. There is really nothing to buy, create, or prepare.

    I'm not trying to knock the treasure box, though. I think it has a place in some schools and classrooms, and it does sound like it might be a good fit for your school. So, keep on with it if it works for you!
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2018
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  6. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    I once had a treasure chest that I thought could be used to contain incentives. Even though I have an extensive background in special ed., I could never buy into any kind of reward system. Keeping track of points, tickets, stars were too much for me to bother with, so the treasure chest contained prizes that were hardly ever given out!

    Like bella, I found that intrinsic motivators were much more effective and didn't cost anything. When I was assigned to the elementary level, I found that I could engage students for long periods with interactive, multimedia lessons. Disruptive kids who could not sit still for more than five minutes, were perfect angels thanks to technology - and their academic achievement levels skyrocketed beyond belief! Behavior problems were also a thing of the past with this approach.
     
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  7. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Jul 19, 2018

    :yeahthat:

    I use engaging multimedia lessons, too, to great effect and my students love them. Great tip for other teachers!
     

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