Teacher training and education...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by GTB4GT, May 3, 2015.

  1. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    May 3, 2015

    My college education and ensuing professional employment (before becoming a teacher later in life) was in the field of engineering. There is a pretty well established hierarchy of schools within this discipline and from my professional experience, the hierarchy holds true to form (for the most part) in terms of excellence of the schools' graduates.

    In the field of elementary or secondary education, is there such a hierarchy? If so, which schools are recognized for the excellence of its graduates? If not, why do you think that is the case?

    As always, TIA. This site is always a wealth of good information and advice. Regards.
     
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  3. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    May 3, 2015

    I don't think that it exists, at least I don't see it.

    Why? I think there is a large part of "art" in teaching, that is harder to put a finger on, let alone replicate or teach.
     
  4. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Truthfully, the teachers I've worked with from prestigious colleges have kind of... well... stunk. One of my former colleagues went to the Teacher's College at Columbia... and was just an awful teacher, in every way imaginable. Another colleague of mine went to Penn State, which is highly ranked for education... and again. Not a good teacher... though in fairness to her, she wanted to teach primary and ended up in fifth grade. She's going to first grade next year, so I'm hoping it will be better.

    I think that colleges have a lot to teach students, and teacher education programs play a far more valuable role than Teach For America would lead you to believe, but there's a definite "It Factor" for teaching.
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    The majority of my teacher friends and I all attended the same Cal State University. Additionally, I have a very close friend who attended UC Berkeley and another who went to UCLA.

    The two friends who attended the more prestigious colleges readily admit that they wish they would've gone to a Cal State University because they feel they would've spent less $$ and gotten the same education as those of us who spent less.

    Some have a knack for teaching and others have to work a bit harder to find success in the classroom. Personally, I've known that I was going to be an educator since 2nd grade. I don't think that my undergrad, teaching credential, or graduate studies necessarily helped me become better prepared for teaching, though. :unsure:
     
  6. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    My best friend went to what was supposedly the "best" university for education in our home state. I went to a small private school that the majority of people have never heard of. I can say without a doubt that my teacher program was significantly better than hers. My program had us out in real classrooms our very first semester, and we did field experiences where we were expected to plan/teach for about 8-15 hours per week every single semester. By the time I was a senior, I'd taught every subject and every grade level within my licensure area. Senior year I student taught for an entire year and was 100% in charge of all planning and teaching for over half of that year. I believe that my program was so good because we spent so much time learning through experience. I felt very prepared when I started teaching, and I've stated here numerous times that my first year of "real" teaching was actually easier than student teaching for me- I didn't necessarily feel like most 1st year teachers describe because I'd had so much experience already. Meanwhile, my friend at the "best" school didn't enter a classroom at all until junior year, and that was only to observe. Her student teaching was 10 weeks, and she was only 100% in charge of all of the teaching for 2 weeks. She entered her first year not feeling like she'd had any "real" experience at all. I honestly don't know why her program was so well known for teachers. I do know that the nearest large university to where we grew up has an excellent reputation for some things, but it was well known that their teaching program wasn't good at all. It's kind of just something that people in the area knew- I don't think it was based on any kind of ranking or anything. I did feel when job searching that my college choice did hurt me, because even though my program was excellent, no one had heard of it, especially since I was applying out of state. I would still say in the end though that actually knowing your stuff is going to out rank name recognition/perception of prestige from whatever college you went to.
     
  7. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    May 4, 2015

    This is similar to Pashtun's response above. Is the "It Factor"measurable or quantifiable? Should it be? And therefore used in selection of students to gain entry into an education major? One of the things you see (and it is a tragedy) is people who attend school for 4 years in the field only to realize they are really not "teacher material". (This happened to my daughter in law). Such a waste of time, talent and $$$.
     
  8. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    May 4, 2015

    My best friend went to Peabody (now part of Vanderbilt) and he was an excellent teacher (ESE). But this was in the 70s.
     

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