Teacher to Parent - A child must be a willing participant in his own education

Discussion in 'General Education' started by TeacherNY, Feb 14, 2020.

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  1. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Feb 26, 2020

    Thank you. You are saying what I've been trying to say, only much better.
     
  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Feb 26, 2020

    To add, not reporting the family is the school giving up on the child.
     
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  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    IEPs came up because I gave an example or what I see (not a generalization of all time the phrase is used) of what happens very often in my local schools. I happened to use a child with a disability to point out that even when the teacher's know there is a disability that gets in the way they still use the phrase. In my experience, a student with or without a disability, it is often used by either those who always take the "it is my classroom and everyone does things my way" or a teacher, well meaning, who has run out of ideas and doesn't want to feel bad about running out of ideas. But that has just been my experience.

    All I know is that the phrase signals a stopping point in the process of helping a student for whatever reason that may be: belief that the teacher or school should only have to do so much, cover up for not knowing what else to do, a school that will not support methods to help the student and the teacher doesn't want to feel bad about it, or authoritarian who expects everyone to adapt to them.
     
  4. rpan

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    Feb 26, 2020

    I guess it depends on the type of teacher who says that horse to water phrase. The teacher who gives it everything day in day out, tries to the best of their knowledge and ability to engage students and admits that the end point has been reached. That’s not shameful to the profession.
    The teacher who is lazy, maybe even incompetent who says that phrase as a justification for their laziness/incompetence/unwillingness to try new strategies etc., I think those teachers shouldn’t be teaching.
    My view is that every student should be given equal opportunity to learn. I welcome all students whether they wanna learn or not. I try my best to engage ALL of them, inspire them to makes goals and learn for their future. By and large I’m quite successful at that. But theres a time, physical and mental limit to what I can do. I don’t believe it is right or fair to “sacrifice” the majority number of students’ learning for 1 student. That’s not me being lazy. That’s me being realistic about the limits of what I can do with what I have. I’m gonna do everything to the best of my ability for students who aren’t engaged, don’t wanna be there, don’t turn up, have undiagnosed physical, mental, emotional disabilities I cannot fix etc. but not at the expense of the others. And I feel good about the decision.
     
  5. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Feb 26, 2020

    I agree with this. I never once said that teachers should do this. I just think that even when they think they tried it all, they should keep looking. I also do not feel that a teacher who is trying should feel bad about themselves because they haven't yet succeeded anymore than a student who is trying should feel bad about themselves because they haven't yet succeeded.

    Growth mindset is for all. Lead a horse is not a signal of a growth mindset. But keep looking for ideas and trying new things until the child moves to the next class is growth mindset.
     
  6. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Feb 26, 2020

    Here's another example where I try hard but have to give up say it is what it is:
    Student (with disabilities) brings fruit to school in lunch bag but no actual lunch. Student is hungry but only eats half the fruit. Student starts whining because he's hungry. I offer him a sandwich, a salad, french fries, and chicken. Student refuses and keeps whining. At that point I'm done and just leave him alone to whine. I've done what I could. i'm not going to the vending machine to get him a snack because he's hungry. I'm not asking the kitchen lady to make him a hamburger. I'm done. We have to leave the cafeteria at some point. Should I have kept trying to find him something to eat or was I justified in "giving up"? I know the right answer but I'm curious to see what you say. He has an IEP but that doesn't mean I need to scour the school for food. I see that as the same thing as mentioned above.
     
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