Teacher Reading Recommendations

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by miss-m, Jun 14, 2016.

  1. miss-m

    miss-m Groupie

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    Jun 14, 2016

    I just accepted a position as a 1st grade co-teacher. I've done a bit with 1st grade -- my first teaching placement was 1st grade once a week for a semester -- but not enough to really KNOW 1st graders. I student taught 2nd, but that's pretty much my only full time teaching experience so far.
    Since it's still early enough in the summer for me to do some prep, what are some good books I can read before August to get ready for teaching 1st grade? I know the school does some form of Daily 5 so I'm planning on reading that and the CAFE book, but what else? I used to have a book called Phonics We Use which I'm super mad I got rid of... I'm also planning on asking the principal if there are any books she would recommend or that the school uses regularly, but she's new to the school this year so I don't know how much she'll be able to tell me.
    What are some resources you've found super helpful for 1st grade?
     
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  3. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Jun 15, 2016

    Here are two books that I would highly recommend, although they deal with multi-aged students.

    Boaler, Jo. Mathematical Mindsets: Unleashing Students’ Potential through Creative Math, Inspiring Messages and Innovative Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2016. I feel too often students are rushed through their workbook pages in both math and reading, especially first graders. Also, from my experience in teaching third grade, I question if sometimes students are rushed into the "lower" reading groups and cemented into staying behind in reading. This book, although dealing primarily with math, offers alternatives that can be applied to all subjects.

    Siegel, Daniel J. and Tina Payne Bryson. No-Drama Discipline: The Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind. New York: Bantam, 2014. Ebook ISBN is 978-0-345-54805-4. Library nbr. is 649.1. This is the best book I've read on this subject. Although it is written primarily to parents, the authors recommend the book for teachers, also. The examples in the book are primarily geared toward younger children.

    A bit off the subject, but I might recommend learning American Sign Language's fingerspelling for many useful applications in an ECE classroom; personally, I've found applications for other signs as well. If learning from a chart, I'd recommend You-Tubing the letters "g", "k", "m", "n", "p", and "t" as they are a bit difficult to represent 2-dimensionally. A great (though expensive) ASL dictionary is Costello, Elaine. Random House Webster's American Sign Language Dictinary. New York: Random House Reference, 2008. (Smaller less expensive editions are also available). If you would include ASL grammar, a book I found quite useful but a bit tricky to understand is Fant, Lou and Barbara Bernstein Fant. The American Sign Language Phrase Book. New York: McGraw Hill, 2011. (ASL grammar is quite different than English grammar).
     
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  4. miss-m

    miss-m Groupie

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    Jun 15, 2016

    Thanks! Can I ask why you recommend knowing asl/finger spelling? I know how to finger spell but I've never had anyone recommend it for ece before outside of using a few letters for bathroom and quiet signals.
     
  5. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Jun 16, 2016

    Fingerspelling and signing can be another kinesthetic activity to reinforce what is being learned. ASL is unique in that it is a multi-dimensional language with the signs being placed in various positions and locations. My 4th year of teaching, I was in a school system that included signing in its phonics lessons. The class would drill "A, apple, /a/" while they fingerspelled "a" and signed "apple". Personally, I think experiences with a second language increase linguistic learning; ASL is considered an actual language, although signed English (not using ASL grammar) is considered an extension of English, the same way written English in books is not a separate language, just another way of representing English. Many schools are offering foreign languages in Kindergarten, now; in my location Chinese is offered. The school system I taught at, above, offered French. Other countries offer English instruction in schools. One advantage in teaching ASL, there are no auditory dialects or accents to be concerned about and from my experience, the visual "dialects and accents" are easily picked up at a later time. On a side note, I hope I wasn't too detailed on my book recommendations on ASL; I was arguing with myself about that this morning before I got on the computer. My thoughts, yesterday, were just in case you or one of the hundreds of other teachers reading the post might be curious concerning extra information on ASL, those were two other books I'd used and would recommend, (and were recommended by my Deaf friend who taught me ASL).
     
  6. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Jul 3, 2016

    First days of school by Harry Wong
    Daily 5... FANTASTIC! I find myself using the right/wrong way models and i-charts for everything.
     
  7. teacher mama

    teacher mama Rookie

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    Jul 7, 2016

    Congratulations on your new job! You will LOVE first grade! The Daily 5 is a great read and there are so many different ideas out there on how to implement it. I chose two books to read this summer...one for math and one for reading. I've just finished Number Talks by Sherry Parrish. I was introduced to this during a workshop a year ago and toyed around with it in the classroom this past year. I bought the book to learn more about how to implement it because I saw great benefits in my classroom and the kids loved it! I'm currently reading The Next Step in Guided Reading by Jan Richardson because one area I want to focus on this year is my small groups. This is by far the best and most practical book I've ever read on how to teach guided reading. It would pair well with the Daily 5/Cafe books. Wishing you a great year!
     
  8. Tres

    Tres New Member

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    Jul 28, 2016

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