Teacher Program Degrees?

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by TeachAstro, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. TeachAstro

    TeachAstro Rookie

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    Feb 26, 2011

    Hi, I have currently applied to a variety of teacher education programs (mostly in California but some in the East Coast) and was mostly looking at the credential + Masters programs. I noticed that different schools had different "types" of masters degree. I've seen M.Ed, Master Teacher, Masters of Arts in Teaching, etc, and I was wondering if there is a significant difference between them? Is there one that schools would "prefer"? Ones that are more "prestigious" or in-depth than others? Decisions haven't been sent out yet but I was just trying to get a feel for what the deal was. If it makes a difference, I'm looking at teaching secondary education, focusing on physics. Thanks so much for your time!
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 26, 2011

  4. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Feb 26, 2011

    Hi Astro,

    I am currently in a CA program that is combined multiple subject credential and MS in Education: Elementary Curriculum and Instruction. I have a friend in a combined secondary credential/MAT program. I DO know that her MAT is less units than my MS, although I'm not sure if that is normally the case.

    One thing I am curious about is that you're looking at teacher prep programs on the east coast as well as in CA. If you plan to return to CA, I wouldn't recommend getting certified on the east coast. CA's requirements are often very different from requirements in other states. It's not impossible to use your certification in other states, but you should research it ahead of time just in case. :)

    Good luck! :)
     
  5. TeachAstro

    TeachAstro Rookie

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    Feb 27, 2011

    Thanks for the info czacza and yellowdaisies. I applied mostly in California because that's where I live/grew up; If I decided to go to one of the east coast schools I wouldn't mind teaching there (since that's obviously where I would be credentialed) but I did wonder about the process if I did decide to go back to California. Would a whole new credential program be required?
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Feb 27, 2011

    Once you're fully certified, no, you shouldn't have to redo the credential program, though - depending on the requirements you fulfill before returning to California - you might have to take either coursework or test for CTEL compliance, which would authorize you to teach English learners in California. You might also need to take the relevant CSET subject-matter exam.
     
  7. TeachSoCal

    TeachSoCal Rookie

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    Mar 2, 2011

    Something to Consider....

    If you do decide to go to school & teach in CA you may want to look at getting your credential and then starting your masters (instead of a "all in one' program)- especially if you have school loans...

    If you are on any type of school loans, you go into repayment 6 months after leaving school. The job situation is pretty dismal in CA so it would be reasonable to predict it will take a bit longer than 6 months to land a job. If you get your credential first, then start the job hunt while getting your masters you can push off repayment a bit longer.

    Many other teachers I worked with who did the combined program said they wished they had "spread it out" so they could defer loans while looking for a job.
     
  8. kab164

    kab164 Companion

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    Mar 11, 2011

    I live in Michigan. Here, you don't even think of getting a masters until you have your four year tenure (due to budget issues). You cost the district more so if they have the choice between a masters and not, they'll choose not most often. Good luck.
     

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