Teacher Pay First Year Alternate Route

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Suzanne Rush, Jul 16, 2020.

  1. Suzanne Rush

    Suzanne Rush New Member

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    Jul 16, 2020

    Hello, I am currently working as an RN.I have had my B.S. degree for 20 years now. I am considering enrolling in an alternate route for teaching. From my research in Mississippi, my salary would be that of a first year teacher. Is this the standard?
     
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  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Yes. In general, public school teaching salaries are based on years of experience teaching and acquired education (degrees and credit hours). Any non-teaching experience you bring with you will not be factored into your salary.
     
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  4. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    In my California district, you are considered an "intern" teacher while you are working towards your credential and teaching full-time, and there is a separate pay scale for intern teachers that runs about 20% less than the one for credentialed teachers. I don't know how it works in Mississippi though.
     
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  5. Suzanne Rush

    Suzanne Rush New Member

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    Ok. I was just curious if the starting salary is the same for all states. Thank you for your reply. It seems that with teacher shortages, they could make it a little more beneficial to those coming in with non-teaching degrees.
     
  6. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    You would be a first year teacher so you would get the salary of a first year teacher. They have no reason to take other experience into consideration unless specifically stated when you apply.
     
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  7. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    No, each state and, in most cases, each district set their own salary schedules. But it is pretty standard to only factor in actual teaching experience (not experience in other roles or fields) to salary, and salaries are overwhelmingly not negotiable, as they just follow the schedule as outlined.
     
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  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 16, 2020

    The only exception that you may receive would be where they would start you on the pay scale if, for instance, you had a master's degree with significant coursework in something like biology, but that wouldn't translate the same if your master's was in nursing procedures. You would need to keep in mind that you would be required to take teacher training, at your own expense, while teaching full time. I can only speak to the rigors of NJ, but as an AR teacher, I had classes after school at the school once a week, classes in the evening elsewhere in the state once a week that ran for three hours, staff meetings, department meetings, and meetings with my advising/mentor teacher. This was all on top of trying to learn how to write lesson plans, managing classroom behavior, and assign and grade assignments. I was one of the lucky ones who had already had some long term sub work, so I knew what I was up against, but that didn't add anymore hours to the day to get everything done. When an AR teacher enters the district, it falls on everyone around them to pick up some of the slack that the AR will not know how to do. Some AR candidates come in determined to make a real career out of their job change, but others come in thinking it is going to be nice to have summers off. I haven't truly had a summer off in the 14 years since entering the teaching profession. I have taken graduate courses, added CEU's, attended conferences, and researched new teaching strategies, all with the goal of being a better teacher, better prepared, and up to date on ways to help my students be more successful. I make more money now, but I worked very hard to get those raises. That first year was the most stressful of the bunch.

    Might I suggest, since you are a nurse, that you find out about becoming a school nurse? It would seem like a better fit, and your years of experience might earn you a bigger salary than transitioning to teaching.
     
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  9. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    This is a really great idea.
     
  10. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Or even teaching nursing classes.
     
  11. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Suzanne,
    Now you are finding out why there is such a teacher shortage. First you spend a year or more on top of your bachelors to get certified, at your own expense, and then you get paid squat. Then add no real lunch breaks, no bathroom breaks, planning time that gets eaten-up with mandatory meetings and trainings, and zillions of things that have to be done on your own time after hours or on weekends with no compensation. Don't forget that new teachers only get one sick day per month, and can't use those days until they accumulate most of the times. Then add that it is almost impossible to get off for medical appointments unless you are fortunate enough not to get sick until the summer. Then they deduct from your already low pay to pay part of your health insurance, and no matter how good of a job you do, you won't get more than a 1-2% raise, if any. I went 5 years with no one at my school getting a pay raise, while our health care costs went up, leaving us all making less money than the year before. And don't forget that if you are in Alaska, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nevada, Ohio or Texas, you are not covered by Social Security.

    Doesn't that all make the "summers off" worth while? But don't forget, you will spend a lot of your summer (usually two weeks) doing required professional development to keep your certification (at your own expense) and probably many other weeks preparing for the upcoming year, or you'll be so behind during the school year, you'll never catch-up.

    Welcome to the world of teaching!
     
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  12. whizkid

    whizkid Groupie

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    Jul 16, 2020

    Yes. It would be a little under $36,000 for the base salary and the addition would come from whatever the district supplement is.
     

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