Teacher License Reciprocity

Discussion in 'General Education' started by bella84, Jun 25, 2020.

  1. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,827
    Likes Received:
    1,769

    Jun 25, 2020

    This seems relevant to a few threads that I've seen posted recently, so I thought I'd share. If you're trying to decide where to get licensed/certified, or if you want to know where else you are eligible to gain licensure/certification, check this out: https://c0arw235.caspio.com/dp/b7f93000e23f35ef70884e45908f.
     
    Tired Teacher likes this.
  2.  
  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,301
    Likes Received:
    725

    Jun 25, 2020

    Bella84,
    Great resource! Thank you for posting this.

    I'd also like to point out that the states that do offer reciprocity require that you have a current professional license in your original state -- not a temporary or provisional one, not an expired one, and not just "eligible" for one -- you have to actually have a current professional license.
     
    Tired Teacher and bella84 like this.
  4. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,446
    Likes Received:
    1,457

    Jun 25, 2020

    I wonder if states that have a yes next to their names are the same states that have the lowest pay? Is there a correlation?
     
    Tired Teacher and gr3teacher like this.
  5. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,269
    Likes Received:
    808

    Jun 25, 2020

    That's a great resource. This one, from elsewhere on the site, provides a little more nuance though: https://c0arw235.caspio.com/dp/b7f93000c5143bf0c78540a0bfa4

    Virginia, for example, doesn't quite have full reciprocity, but the only additional requirements for teachers with 3+ years of experience are a CPR course, a child abuse course, and AED course.
     
    bella84 and Tired Teacher like this.
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,301
    Likes Received:
    725

    Jun 25, 2020

    Oh yes, there definitely is a correlation.
     
  7. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2019
    Messages:
    1,289
    Likes Received:
    651

    Jun 25, 2020

    1 thing I noticed were they were states that really need teachers w/ the exception of Hawaii. I think they probably have a hard time retaining teachers there though. Even though it's a beautiful place to visit, I have heard the PS have a lot of problems there.
    All of the people I know (who are not close to rich, but OK off), have or had their kids in private schools on Oahu anyways b/c of the PS having a really bad rep. Plus, a friend of mine worked there a short time.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2020
  8. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,301
    Likes Received:
    725

    Jun 25, 2020

    I have a friend who taught in Hawaii. She said the cost of living is so high, and reasonably priced apartments, condos, and homes are so rare, that it is impossible to live on what they pay unless you have a spouse who earns a good living outside of teaching.

    She was single, and ended up having to live very far away from her school, in a very questionable neighborhood, in a tiny, run-down apartment. She said she couldn't always afford food or gas for her car, because everything is so high priced on the island. She also said the "better off" families there send their kids to private school. She only stayed the one year. She said she was scared where she was living, and couldn't afford any better. She also had to take a second job in the hospitality business just to make ends meet.
     
    Tired Teacher likes this.
  9. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,827
    Likes Received:
    1,769

    Jun 25, 2020

    That looks like a great resource, too. Although I see that child abuse and neglect, as well as dyslexia training, are also required in Virginia, unless I'm misinterpreting.
     
  10. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,827
    Likes Received:
    1,769

    Jun 25, 2020

    I actually don't see a correlation to teacher pay or a shortage of teachers, based on my own experiences. The two states where I'm certified (Missouri and Illinois) are included in the eight that have reciprocity, and neither has overall low pay or a teacher shortage. Of course there may be certain regions or districts that don't pay as well as others, and there may be certain regions or districts that have a hard time finding teachers, but neither is a widespread problem across either state. Missouri actually has one of the top teacher retirement systems across the country, which I think is something to consider along with teacher pay. I've only taught in urban and suburban areas, so I can't speak to the situation in rural or even mid-size towns. In my experience, though, the urban/suburban areas routinely have more teacher candidates than positions available, and teacher pay is fairly reasonable, especially when compared to other states that truly have low teacher pay. It's not easy to get by on a teacher salary in either area, but my understanding is that the situation is much worse in a few other states, some of which are indicated on the list as having reciprocity.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2020
  11. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,301
    Likes Received:
    725

    Jun 25, 2020

    You are correct, bella84. In Virginia, you are now required to have dyslexia training, first aid and CPR training, and the state required child abuse and neglect training. Additionally, if you teach secondary social studies or history, you have to pass the new Virginia State and Local Civic Education Module.

    In Florida, you also have to take the child abuse and neglect training (although they will not accept any other state's training, it has to be theirs,) and you also now have to be ESOL certified, and if you teach elementary or any classes relating to reading or writing, you also have to get your Reading Specialist certification (right now, they are still giving a 5-year span to earn this if you are already certified in Florida.)

    These things change so quickly that online lists are often out-of-date right after they are written.
     
  12. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,301
    Likes Received:
    725

    Jun 25, 2020

    It's good to have a different point-of-view. The ones I was referring to were Florida, Hawaii, and Oklahoma. The pay is shockingly low compared to the cost of living in these states (especially Florida and Hawaii.)
     
  13. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2019
    Messages:
    1,289
    Likes Received:
    651

    Jun 25, 2020

    Yeah, that is totally true! I'd retire there if it weren't for that 1 reason.
    Also, 1 of my relatives is a P in Chicago and she told me teachers were scarce there....she works in a fairly dangerous area is my guess. They were doing a program like Vista at 1x to get teachers b/c of the shortage. That was a few yrs ago though, so maybe Illinois isn't desperate for teachers in places. I know AZ was recruiting teachers from the Philippines, and Florida is known to be an unpleasant place to work due to pressure put on teachers. I have heard more complaints about Florida than any other state over the last 15 years or so. There is probably a good school in Florida to work ( lol) , I just have never heard of one.
     
  14. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,301
    Likes Received:
    725

    Jun 25, 2020

    Florida is the worst place to be a teacher that you can imagine (in my experience.) The stress, the mandatory "extended-days," the mandatory ESOL certification, and the ridiculously low pay, and the new reliance on (mandatory scripted instruction in the lower grades...
     
    Tired Teacher likes this.
  15. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,301
    Likes Received:
    725

    Jun 25, 2020

    When I was teaching in Virginia, our inner-city school district could not find special ed teachers who would stay. The job was too hard, the workload too heavy, and the burn-out rate was constant.

    They recruited a group of sped teachers from the Philippines. We had one at our school (she was the nicest lady!!!) but the one at our school is the only one who came back after the first year -- and the district had paid them all hiring bonuses, relocation expenses, helped them get temporary licenses, gave them assistance in getting housing, the whole works!!

    But truth is truth -- the students had trouble understanding them because of the heavy accents, they didn't know the area (of course) and all ended up in questionable neighborhoods to save on expenses, without realizing they were in high-crime areas. (Most of the other teachers lived in a nearby city with a lower crime rate and nice suburbs, but these teachers couldn't because they didn't drive and there was no transportation between the cities unless you owned a car and could drive.) They didn't have cars (or licenses) and our city's public transport system was woefully inadequate. They didn't know the American education system, much less all the peculiarities of our school district. They didn't know the state standards. They were completely overwhelmed by the IEP paperwork and requirements. They didn't know or understand the IEP regulations.

    The other teachers were mostly upset that these foreign teachers were given hiring bonuses and relocation expenses, so they sort of "froze them out," which certainly didn't help. The one at our school stayed because an older sped aid and her husband "adopted her" and even let her move in with them when the apartment she rented turned out to be in a crime-ridden, drug-infested neighborhood, and someone shot through her window one night.

    My point is this -- these jobs were available because the work conditions were bad, the pay was low, living conditions weren't good unless you had another income source and transportation to a more affluent area, and after the district paid out all this money, only one stayed. The district lost its shirt!
     
  16. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2019
    Messages:
    1,289
    Likes Received:
    651

    Jun 25, 2020

    OH! They are so desperate for sped people here now that if you can complete paperwork and certified, you're hired. It is the only teaching job like that here. You do not need any personal or teaching skills. You need skills to tell aides what to do too.
    It is interesting what you saw about the teachers from the Philippines. I only read about the ones in AZ and the article put a positive spin on it in a way. Like they would work tirelessly, more hours, less complaints, were very happy making more $$ in the US. IDK if it is true or not, but the article said that they hired highly experienced teachers.
     
    YoungTeacherGuy likes this.
  17. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,446
    Likes Received:
    1,457

    Jun 26, 2020

    My partner’s cousin moved to Arizona a couple of years ago on a work visa. She teaches middle school math. Lots of successful experience from teaching in the Philippines, but she’s getting paid much more here, and she’s able to send home a big chunk of money to family each month.

    I believe her visa is only valid for 5 years (from what I understand). She will have to go back home soon.

    Her school has two other teachers who were hired from the same staffing agency. They all live together. Smart bunch of ladies and they all teach hard-to-staff subjects like math and science.
     
    Tired Teacher likes this.
  18. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,015
    Likes Received:
    2,718

    Jun 26, 2020

  19. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2015
    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    153

    Jun 26, 2020

    I can say this about Hawaii. I have always wanted to live there, but the cost of living is unbelievable. When i was on my honeymoon, I saw a sign at a school we passed looking for teachers. I gave them a call, and while they were really excited to talk to me, and were very interested in hiring me, the principal made it very clear that we would not be able to afford to live in Hawaii on my salary. He said most of their teachers are military wives, so it works for them. When I told him my husband was not military, he basically said "I'm not wasting your time. You could be the absolute best teacher there is, and we can pay you the top dollar, and everything about the school could be perfect, but you won't be able to stay here for more than 2 years"
     
    Tired Teacher and RainStorm like this.
  20. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,827
    Likes Received:
    1,769

    Jun 26, 2020

    Missouri has a similar module for dyslexia. We have to watch it every year. I typically play it in a tab of my browser while I'm doing other things in other tabs. I return to the tab to click a button when I hear that it stops making sound.

    I wonder, though, how does Virginia incorporate this course and the others required if they are necessary prior to gaining a license? In Missouri, you get this training through your district once you are employed (and presumably certified/licensed). As you noted, the training could easily be conducted at a staff meeting. But how does it work for potential teachers who need the training in order to get certified so that they can get a job? Is there a way to prove that you've viewed the course?
     
  21. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,827
    Likes Received:
    1,769

    Jun 26, 2020

    I think you probably have this one right. Chicago does not have a teacher shortage overall. It's very competitive to get into a school that is located in a desirable part of the city or in a desirable suburb. However, in some of the less desirable (either "dangerous" or distant) areas, there is a lot of turnover, and it can be hard to staff some positions.
     
    Tired Teacher likes this.
  22. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,269
    Likes Received:
    808

    Jun 26, 2020

    I got hired in Virginia with an out-of-state teaching certificate. My district then sat me at a computer in their HR department while I did the courses necessary for the provisional certificate.
     
    bella84 likes this.
  23. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,015
    Likes Received:
    2,718

    Jun 26, 2020

    Just guessing, but if you are coming into VA and have a certificate in another state, they give you a certain time-frame to take the VCLA to get your certificate in VA. You can't get a permanent certificate without the VCLA, even if you have a certificate from another state, and I would be willing to bet that if you were hired you would need to watch that module ASAP once hired. Seems to me that my son had just under two years to take and pass the VCLA and turn in all paperwork to the state. Once that was done, he was granted a VA certificate. He is a traditionally trained teacher, and also has his MEd. in TESOL, which is what they hired him for. He already had his CEAS to teach in NJ before taking the job down there. I think that he is now credentialed in VA in Elem. Ed., Music K-12, and TESOL, the same CEAS that he had when in NJ. I actually asked him about the dyslexia training, because ESL students virtually never get evaluated in anything that could be construed as SPED. I teach SPED and I have had ESL students who were being evaluated because the CST didn't realize that the students were illiterate in English, even though they had BICS, and could carry on a casual conversation with you. When you got them into academic language, however, they were lost and then they would act out instead of admitting they couldn't read. So they were in a program for Emotional Behaviors instead of ESL. Go figure!

    Missed the post before this one - I apologize for the duplication.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2020
  24. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,827
    Likes Received:
    1,769

    Jun 27, 2020

    That makes sense... Although I thought I understood the table to say that exams were only required if a candidate had less than three year experience. If districts there are open to hiring people before they've gained fully certification, then it seems easy enough to watch the video when hired. I've actually had the opposite experience with ESL students and sped. In my former district, it was nearly impossible to have an ESL student evaluated for sped, even though some genuinely had a disability along with a lack of English proficiency. It was just assumed that all delays had to be due to ESL status rather than taking a closer look to see if it might be something more.
     
  25. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2019
    Messages:
    1,289
    Likes Received:
    651

    Jun 27, 2020

    I had a very similar experience. If you had a spouse employed at the hospital or university they were more than willing to hire you too. I really wanted to work there at 1x in my life. I searched for decent apartments that were affordable, decent, and safe. It is the only state that is more expensive than here to live.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. RainStorm,
  2. 3dprintindex
Total: 335 (members: 3, guests: 304, robots: 28)
test