Teach or Student Teach?

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by MissWull, Feb 16, 2007.

  1. MissWull

    MissWull Cohort

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    Feb 16, 2007

    Hi everyone. I'm in my first term of getting my credential, and at my school I heard of several people getting teaching jobs before their credential. I have seriously considered doing this, not now but perhaps when I'm in my 3rd term of my credential (after summer) but after reading a lot of this "1st year" stories, I'm kind of thinking maybe I should just stick to the credential program. It is a lot of work in and of itself, and I keep wondering if doing student teaching will give me more experience than just taking on a teaching job on my own for the next school year. What would you all say? Did student teaching help a lot with your experiences? Also, do you think it would be near impossible to finish a credential and start as a first year teacher?
     
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  3. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Enthusiast

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    Feb 16, 2007

    Well coming from someone who didnt do student teaching I think it hindered my job search quite a bit. I did sub for 6 years but not everyday. Don't get me wrong subbing helped tremendously, but there are so many other things that I have learned since the beginning of this year that I probably would have learned in student teaching. That being said there are things you are never going to learn until you are there,day in,day out, and the trenches of teaching. No matter if you student teach or not. If I had it to do all over again I probably would have choosen to student teach in some form or fashion.
     
  4. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    Feb 16, 2007

    Some of the folks in my cohort have internships in which they teach full time. So, it can be done. But they were really stressed the first few months. My credential program recommends we avoid internships if we can for that reason. Another reason to avoid an internship is that you are essentially on your own in the classroom. When you student teach, your master teacher can provide you invaluable guidance and even help you do things in the classroom that would be impossible by yourself. I am glad I did not take an internship.
     
  5. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    Feb 16, 2007

    Student teaching is better. You can learn best from a master teacher. Go the student teaching route. It will help you in the long run. Terry G.
     
  6. Erin Elizabeth

    Erin Elizabeth Groupie

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    Feb 18, 2007

    I agree with everything that Malcolm said. Though you do not learn everything about teaching by any means, student teaching gives you a good solid foundation (and confidence) to prepare you for teaching on your own. I cannot imagine just jumping into teaching without first having had support and training from an experienced master teacher. I am very glad I chose student teaching rather than an internship.

    Plus, here in California the credential requirements are quite strict and always changing. If I were you I would want to get my credential first before starting my career.
     
  7. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

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    Feb 18, 2007

    Depending on where you are doing your program, how long it will take, and when you started, think about switching to an internship midway through. I began my program in the spring (two semester program) and got one semester of the credtential program out of the way, and then began an internship in the second half of the program. In my program, we were doing heavy observation and transitioning into student teaching in the first semester, so I felt like I had already had a good start with the student teaching component.

    I agree with the others, I think an internship with NO in class management experience would be very difficult and probably not worth the money.
     
  8. GatorGal

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    Feb 18, 2007

    MissWull, I would say that if you have the opportunity to student teach, take advantage of it.

    I personally am trying to go the route of teaching before a professional credential, and I am stressed out already! As I've mentioned in previous posts, my university doesn't offer ST for secondary ed undergrads. So, now I'm faced with taking the certification exams in addition to my last semester of classes, as well as subbing three days a week to gain experience. And this is only to obtain a "temporary license." I'll have to take more classes during my first year teaching.
    Hopefully it will work out, but I definitely wish I could work directly under a seasoned teacher in my specific subject. I would feel so much more prepared!!
     
  9. MissWull

    MissWull Cohort

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    Feb 18, 2007

    Well, my program is 1 year long...four 9 week terms. I will be done with my first term at the end of March. They kind of encourage getting a teaching position if possible, or even a long term subbing position; because there are 2 different "tracks" within the program I'm in. Track A is for people who aren't in a teaching position, and Track B is for people who are. Basically if you're in Track B you don't have to do student teaching, because the teaching you're already doing counts for that. I wouldn't want to start teaching until the next school year, if I do at all, but that is also when the student teaching would start...

    In April we have the opportunity to interview for several districts...and I think if I am offered a position I might take it...but I'm just not 100% sure if that would be the best move...
     
  10. txteach2b

    txteach2b Comrade

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    Feb 19, 2007

    I'm in a certification program, and I won't be able to do student teaching till Spring of '09. I found out I'd have to quit my job. I can't quit working because I am a single parent to a 3 y/o. Right now, I'm a paraprofessional at a local high school. I found out that if you're a para for 2 years, it will count towards your student teaching. I'm going to opt for that. I do everything a teacher does right now, anyway. I'm in a special education math room, and we've split the classes into 2 groups -- the teacher takes the higher level, and I take the lower level, and I'm responsible for planning, testing, grading, etc. I just tell the teacher what we're doing, and give her the grades to record. The other experience I've had earlier this year has helped me prepare for this as well; I was in a long term sub spot for 6 weeks, but that is another story.
     
  11. ORBusyBee

    ORBusyBee New Member

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    Feb 21, 2007

    I think a mixture is the best way to go, if possible. I worked 6 years at a Wildlife Education Center (the students came to us for programs), 1 year as a substitute, 1 semester I did a practicum in the schools and now I am going to do my student teaching. I hope that this experience will help to make my first year an enjoyable one.
     
  12. alt edu

    alt edu Companion

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    Feb 21, 2007

    I would STRONGLY suggest student teaching if you are able to. The valuable lessons you learn IN the classroom WITH a master teacher there with you are FAR MORE valuable than what you learn in your classes.... my student teaching experience was PRICELESS and totally enjoyable. Now that I am in my first year teaching I am SO GRAETFUL I had that experience.
     
  13. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    Feb 21, 2007


    I think this is a good deal. You should not have to quit your job. Terry G.
     
  14. srh

    srh Devotee

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    Feb 22, 2007

    Unless things have changed a lot in the past two years, there are not many internships available anyway, especially in California. It helps if you are math/science/special ed, and in anything but elementary. But still, not a lot out there. Going for a K-8 credential in general ed, I had no choice but to student teach. But it was a great experience...

    And I DID have to quit my job, a 13-year fed career, in order to do the full-time final student teaching. I did part-time student teaching for two semesters while continuing to work full-time (classes at night, worked 10-12 hours days to earn comp time to take off early two days a week to ST). But that third semester, it was "bite the bullet." Said goodbye to stability, great pay, and cool perks. Again, it was all worth it. Best move I ever made!
     
  15. Anyalee

    Anyalee Companion

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    Feb 23, 2007

    Student teaching is there for a reason! I found it to be A LOT easier than my first year, and I was glad for the practice without much responsibility.
     
  16. orangepurple

    orangepurple Companion

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    Mar 5, 2007

    internships vs. student teaching

    It sounds like a lot of you are strongly in favor of student teaching! I was hoping to hear the opposite, because I really really need a job. Anyone have a good experience with internships?

    I have taught in the past, without a credential: a year in a private high school, a year with young adults, a year in a foreign college teaching English. Thought about getting a credential, but got sidetracked by other things, ended up staying at home with the kids for years, now want to get back into it. Have been subbing for about a year.

    I have been thinking about trying Project Pipeline, where you have an internship and take courses every other weekend for two years to get the credential. Anyone have any experience with that? I've also applied to a CSU for regular credential program, but I'm not sure if I can really afford to give up subbing.

    Any interns out there?
     
  17. Anyalee

    Anyalee Companion

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    Mar 6, 2007

    That sounds like it would not be fun....teaching and then taking weekend classes would be a TON of work. I would find another way to do it if I were you.
     
  18. curious

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    Mar 6, 2007

    My view is different than most...Years ago, I was working as an aide and got 'thrown' into a teaching position at a private school (the regular teacher gave a day's notice before quitting). I didn't receive any help. I created my own curriculum and classroom management plan. My first year was hard, but it worked out. And the next year was a lot easier.

    If my college would allow me to skip student teaching, I would in a heartbeat. Teaching for free for four months is going to be a big strain on the family budget. We still don't know who's going to take care of our 3-yr-old.

    If you feel like you could handle teaching, then I say go where the money is. Just have a good classroom management plan ready and know your content.
     
  19. Crys68

    Crys68 Rookie

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    Mar 10, 2007

    I am sear the end of my credential which will soon involve every day student teaching in August, which also means quitting my full time (with benefits) Teacher's assistant job and I am opting to finding a teaching job lateral entry in a nearby county that hires lateral entry. Just like the poster above, I cannot afford to quit a full time job with benefits. I do also have a part time job but I don't make enough there to survive. I am currently in the first part of my student teaching which is 1 day a week in the classroom where I will be ST every day in August and I can't stant the teacher or her philosophy. I've learned more in my TA position and am allowed to do more instructional activites in her class. Now, if I hadn't been a TA before, I would think student teaching is imperative but if you've worked in a classroom before, I say go for it!! Who wants to pay a University to work every day and go financially broke when you can work a little harder in your own classroom but get paid!! It is all up to the individual I think!

    Chris
     
  20. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Mar 10, 2007

    I'm lucky that the two teachers I've worked with in the last two years have both given me plenty of responsibility and let me run with whatever I would like to do. I know a few times I told them I was disappointed that a lesson I did wasn't as good as I wanted it to be. One of my teachers said, but you just sat and told me what you would do differently next time. That's what it is all about. You don't really learn until you do it. Then I realized that unless it was detrimental to the students, they really created an atmosphere where I am learning hands on about thier job. I love them for it. I do know we don't have that kind of aide to teacher kind of program because one of my teachers had to go back and complete a student teaching program (unpaid) even though she had been teaching in that very classroom for the past 4 years (with a co-teacher)!! This is her first year alone, with me as her aide.
     
  21. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Mar 12, 2007

    I would say to student teach if at all possible. I know several people who have gone alternate routes and have had a really rough time for the first several years (espescially the first one) I also recently read a study about people who did not student teach leaving within five years of starting. I think it is a lot of classes and work to not do everything you can to prepare yourself for a career.

    I do know that for some it is almost impossible to take a semester out of your life to student teach, but I think you should seriously try to do it.
     
  22. QuittingTeacher

    QuittingTeacher Rookie

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    Mar 12, 2007

    Student Teach

    I went into teaching as a second career. I too could not afford to quit work to become a teacher, so I took the internship route. In TN you have to work for 2 years if you don't student teach in order to get full certification. I HAD NO IDEA what I was getting myself into. :eek:
    I may be in a little different situation, I was teaching 3 months before my first official education course. I had no idea how to do anything. The only things I did know were from being a student myself. I had a rough time, no classroom (on a cart), the other teachers were not very supportive of me--because I went the other way in, and I was pretty much left to my own to figure it all out. I am in my second year, quitting in 3 weeks. I spent 2 nights a week in classes then went all day all summer, and then two nights a week last fall. I am burned out. I do have mentoring support, but it is a person who is retired and only stops in once a month and she taught a totally different subject area. Don't get me wrong, my mentor teacher is a wonderful person.
    I honestly thought I was treated differently in my education courses as well. My professors frowned upon going in before full certification.
    But I honestly think if I had gone the traditional route, I may not be quitting right now. I hope your situation works out better than mine. I know all situations are not as difficult as mine has been, but definitely go over every stipulation of the internship carefully.
     
  23. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    Mar 12, 2007

    Good point! Fifty percent of new teachers leave the profession within five years. You need all the support you can get.
     
  24. srh

    srh Devotee

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    Mar 12, 2007

    I thought my student teaching/teacher ed/second career/have to quit work/diminished income was more of a rarity that it apparently is! I've said so much on other threads, I won't bore anyone again. But there is a saying that goes, "Anything worth doing is worth doing WELL." I think that possibly the BEST way (no, not the easiest or least expensive way) to experience teaching in preparation for one's own classroom is to experience as much as possible. I cannot imagine having begun to teach without the experience of the three classrooms in which I student taught. I observed the expertise of master teachers and was involved greatly in the lives of many students, all the while, NOT being 100% responsible for everything that happened in the classroom. That was a tiime of blessing for me!!

    I would encourage ANYONE to go the extra mile, lose the hours of sleep, stay up until the wee hours, even spend too much money for incidentals to make the lesson a little more fun...to accomplish this. After all (another saying coming up)..."This too shall pass." And then you will be forever on your own!!
     
  25. MissWull

    MissWull Cohort

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    Mar 13, 2007

    Wow, a lot of different opinions since I last read this. Hmmmmm...well the school I'm trying to shoot for has quite a few openings, some in Kindergarten and I already know 2 of the K teacher's there VERY well...they always offer their assistance and opinions/advice to me. So in a situation like that I wouldn't mind just diving in to teach...but perhaps at a different school not knowing anyone...that would be different.

    The money aspect is very hard, although I'd rather not jump in to just start making money it is near impossible to ST and live on a PT job...I mean yes I do have a fiance and our finances are combined for the most part but I don't expect him to pay for everything for me...and I would be putting us in a really bad spot if I did.

    I've heard so many bad experiences about ST, that it was just an extra hassle while getting the credential. But apparently not many of you had those experiences!! :) Which is good, but still makes me wonder which route is the best to go...I guess I'll just have to wait and see when an opp. actually does present itself and what seems right at the time...thanks for all your thoughts/views/advice/opinions!! :)
     
  26. srh

    srh Devotee

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    I had NO income during the last semester, final student teaching. I am self-supporting and a homeowner too. I simply took out extra student loan money and lived off that and my tax return from the previous year...I lived on a shoestring for ten months. (I expected a first check in August, but didn't get it until September 30!) Again, SO MUCH is doable if you absolutely make it work. (I also have no family in town, no one to mooch off of!! :-D)
     
  27. 3rdTeacher

    3rdTeacher New Member

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    Although I wish to agree with you because money is hard to turn down, every teacher who has satisfied their credentials have been there and done it, money and support wise. I find it very hard to support colleagues who have not completed their credentials without that last sacrifice. We all know started our schooling that student teaching is a part of it and if we didn't know, I guess we didn't investigate our career goal good enough. I work with a teacher who is on waiver while completing a alternative licensure. He is basically getting paid to perform his student teaching. Why should he get paid when so many of us sacrificed the time, effort, and money to do ours? He has had so many problems with discipline, behavior management, and just teaching students. I know that I should not compare everyone who chooses this route to him. I only finished schooling in Dec. 2005 and without that schooling behind me, I would have never made it in the classroom. I know it seems SO good to get into a job and you have colleague backup but what would parent's think. Personally, I want a teacher who has her credentials teaching my kindergarten student.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2007
  28. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    I have to agree that if I knew my child's teacher was in their first year of teaching and had not officially completed licensure, I would try to get them into another class. It doesn't seem fair to experiment with students education to gain experience just for the sake of getting paid to do it. I can understand teacher aide exemptions, they have essentially taught under a master teacher and have a similar experience, but most other alt. cert. seems to make the children pay the real price of losing a year of quality instruction to let someone train for the next year.
     
  29. MissWull

    MissWull Cohort

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    Mar 17, 2007

    Hmmmm...I see both of your point. But it's not like it's THAT unheard of for teachers to be intern teaching. Plus not all teachers going into it have the bare minimum experience. There are some people in my program that are getting internships and they have been VERY active in the district and the classrooms. If it was that big of a problem I don't think any districts would even allow it. Even a first year teacher doesn't necessarily have all the experience in the world just because they did the student teaching. I'm sure you've heard just as many nightmares of student teaching that I have. Plus around here (I don't know of other places) they pair you with a mentor teacher, so there is help, just not inside the classroom every minute...

    I don't think it's fair to not support teachers who didn't student teach, because everyones situation is SO different. You never know what extent they went to and things in life change, for the good and bad you just may not know what the teacher has done to try get do student teaching but just couldn't make it happen...
     
  30. Mr. Windchill

    Mr. Windchill Rookie

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    Well it seems as though I will be going against the grain, and perhaps frowned upon by some. I was able to slide into a full-time teaching position prior to completing certification.

    I don't regret the decision I made at all. If there is anything I do regret, it was not seeking certification while earning my degree. But that's another story regarding college, switching degrees, etc. that has a lot to do with military obligations and deployments.

    As I said, regarding getting on as a long-term sub. versus going back to school I am extremely happy with my decision. This is for several reasons:

    - Social Studies gigs can be hard to come by as it is.
    - I adapt well with jumping in the deep end and having to figure things out on my own in a hurry and with success.
    - The experience I gained this year in the classroom far exceeds what I would/will receive in the classroom and I look forward to using that experience to help me through school.
    - Sure, money is/was an issue but doesn't take away from any of the reasons I mentioned above.

    As mentioned in previous posts, getting the job first is a route many don't prefer because they wanted the student teaching experience, and others simply need the experience.

    I knew education was in my future. I was president of my high school's Future Educators of America; I read to pre-school kids after school while in high school; I have always enjoyed teaching others in anything etc. It was a complicated journey that lead me to where I am. I was not someone who wanted to give teaching a try and figured if I could get the job, 'why not.'

    Could you argue that I am a disservice to my school district? Perhaps! Would some parents raise a cow if they leared of my credentials? Sure (as would many airline pax if they realized how few flight hours their pilots have--I'm a private pilot, feel free to ask for more info)!

    However; I teach the material, I cover the content standards, my students realize I'm a no-nonsense guy who is in control and does not want them wasting my, their fellow students, or the taxpayers time. And for the most part I have a good raport with my students.

    Yes, this year I experienced quite the learning curve. However I thrive on challenges like that. I have even gone the extra mile to make my own quizzes and tests opposed to using 'test generator' cds because I know what I covered and I know what I emphasized. Organization has been a constant learning experience. I have a mentor and he is an extremely great guy. He and his classroom, however, seem miles away and I don't see him that much. I have no problems with this because those around me are great about offering help if I ask. My department is very hands off as well. We are on our own, and I feel this has done nothing but strengthen my ability from the start to develop what works well for me from the start.

    I am sure there are some who are less than thrilled by my presence (and I often wonder if one such person is my department head, but I'm told it's his character), but for the overwhelming majority I was treated from the start as another faculty member who has a job to do and should/will know how to do it.

    That's my "grass is greener" point of view!
     
  31. srh

    srh Devotee

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    Mar 18, 2007

    I think there are some raised eyebrows because of personal feelings some may have about their own struggles to "get it done." Many of us are career changers--I returned to school at age 45; many of us sacrificed higher salaries, great perks, and the underrated "comfort zone." Why? Because of a higher calling, a need for fulfillment, whatever. Yes, it was my choice (and others' choices) to do that, and I'll never ever regret it.

    But I know people in my credential program who shortcutted their way through every assignment, including NOT showing up for many student teaching days, but getting the credit anyway. In one case, the teacher, who was the first of our little group to be hired, was also the first to be let go from a district. It seems the shortcutting was not acceptable in a real job, and the teacher probably could have learned better how to handle many things if she had applied herself during her student teaching, etc. The training and expectations really do serve a purpose.

    I'm not saying that you, Mr. Windchill, or anyone else for that matter, is "shortcutting." But I do think that the perception can be that, "I had to do it, why shouldn't you?" Granted, some programs have loopholes such as internships for desperately needed areas, and that is very understandable. But I had taught children's ministries, directed summer Bible schools, raised two successful students of my own, all while being employed as a manager in the federal court system, when I began my journey to teach. I might have opted to jump right into the classroom WITHOUT student teaching if it had been possible, but it wasn't. And I'm not sure I would have wanted any "different" treatment. So much depends on your program and your area needs. But I know my path to teaching has all been meaningful...nothing has been a waste.

    I'm not starting an argument--I just thought I'd further explain this other perspective! I have questioned why some people don't have to jump through the same hoops too! Never underestimate the saying, "We've never done it that way before!"
     
  32. MissWull

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    Mar 18, 2007

    SRH - good reply. I think I was trying to fit something like what you said in my post but it just didn't come out as thorough..but what you said makes total sense. :)

    I'm definitely not trying to shortcut anywhere, because I don't want to. This is the career I love and want to know everything about, I do all the readings, assignments, projects to my best ability. Like I said before, even as first year teachers or 10th year teachers, we're all still learning. Especially during the first years we're trying to find what style, approach, etc. fits the person we are and want to be as a teacher. So just because someone jumps into an intern position or not doesn't mean they don't know as much as the student teaching person.
     
  33. my58vw

    my58vw Rookie

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    Mar 23, 2007

    I should have an interesting perspective here...

    Many of you know that I just got done with my 8 week student teaching assignment, and am scheduled for a second 12 week starting on Monday. I was just hired for 2007/2008 with one of the larger local school districts. Before student teaching I had three very difficult long term assignments. Let me tell you, the first two weeks in each assignment were misrible - and not just because I was a sub.

    Looking back on the last 8 weeks, I know I learned more from long term than student teaching, maybe it was because I had a horable master teacher, who knows... that said, classroom management is very difficult to master if you have not had experience - and I learned that the hard way. Student teaching if it doesn't teach you how to teach, it will teach you how to manage a class.

    BTW if you screw up the first 2 - 3 weeks in an internship management wise, good luck for the rest of the year!
     
  34. Anyalee

    Anyalee Companion

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    Mar 23, 2007

    I ABSOLUTELY agree with you. Student teaching is sort of a hoop to get through and you learn a little, but your first assignment is where you pick everything up.
     
  35. orangepurple

    orangepurple Companion

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    Mar 23, 2007

    thanks for your comments, my58vw--an interesting addition to this thread.
    I have had a couple of different teaching jobs in the past, although I don't have a credential (private school, foreign school, etc.) and I have to agree with you that the first couple of weeks are crucial. The voice of experience. I have also found that I've learned a great deal from subbing.
    I'd love to go to school full time and do the student teaching route and feel as well prepared as possible, but for various (family) reasons have decided I can't do that this year. I may end up doing an internship program or I may try to just keep working this year and try to do the traditional route next year. I don't know!
     
  36. MissWull

    MissWull Cohort

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    Mar 25, 2007

    I agree that classroom management, introduced and implemented throughout the year, is very crucial. I've been subbing for a while and have never had a problem...along with that I worked with children from 6 months to 12 years old for the past 6 years. Structure was needed because there were activities that would take place...so the fact that I had to demo activities, help students, etc. while watching other children that did not want to participate...I have seen a LOT of slack and stern management approaches to children's behavior. I've developed a philosophy in that and have applied it to the classes I sub and it seems to work well. I know having my own classroom for an entire year would be different, but I worked that job just like a teaching job would call for (time-wise).

    I've seen co-workers come in and want to be friends with all the kids and it may work sometimes but it usually goes downhill after a while. I've seen the co-workers come and be overly harsh and the kids wouldnt like them nor listen to them much. There is definitely a happy medium in there and every child has to be disciplined, consistency is obviously key...I could go on but I know you all have heard things like this before.

    Bottomline, I've had experience with management before...I'm not saying I'm an expert (far from it!) but I'm just saying this isn't something that is brand new to me. So I will apply what I've learned from my past experiences and go with the flow!

    I appreciate all your opinions though, they have all opened my eyes to pros and cons...which there are obviously a lot for going either way, student teaching or just teaching...I will need to consider a lot if a offer does come about...decisions decisions! :)
     
  37. DrMama

    DrMama New Member

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    Jun 24, 2007

    Look beyond the "intern" label

    I have to say that I'm disappointed to read that some people are against the very idea of intern teachers being allowed to teach in classrooms. Not all interns are the same.

    I have a PhD in History, 10+ years of college-level teaching experience (some as the instructor of record, some as a TA, where I worked with many people I consider master teachers), 1 year of middle school teaching (private school), plus part-time experience tutoring and substitute teaching everything from K through 12.

    But I don't have a credential.

    And if the internship option were not available, I could not even think about earning one. It's not even a question of making sacrifices--I could not pay the university money to work for no pay for a semester.

    So, I'm happy the intern option exists. I know it won't be easy, but it's my only option.

    And based on my teaching experience, I would NOT recommend the internship option to anyone who has only limited teaching experience.

    But I would never say "interns are unqualified to teach."

    I know lots of FANTASTIC teachers who do not have credentials, and I've had several lousy ones who do.

    As a parent, my question would never be "Does the teacher have a credential?" but rather "Is he/she an AMAZING teacher?" My older child's primary teachers have had credentials AND been amazing teachers. The specials teachers at that school, however, have been more mixed. Some great ones with and without credentials, and a couple not so great ones without.

    In the case of the not so great ones, I do think earning a credential would improve their skills, but that assessment is based on my experience with them and observations of their work.

    So, I hope that if your school has intern teachers, you will look beyond the "intern" label and get to know them and their experience. They may have extensive teaching experience but simply not have followed the credential path until now. Or they may be completely unprepared to be in a classroom. Or they might be somewhere in the middle.

    But you should also not assume that "credential" equals "great teacher."
     
  38. eduk8r

    eduk8r Enthusiast

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    Jun 24, 2007

    I chose to student teach first, so I'd be best prepared for my own classroom. I guess because it was so important to me to do it right? But it made it so that I couldn't get hired in my district, because two weeks before I started my student teaching I was offered an internship by the district and I turned it down, saying that I felt I'd be better prepared if I did that first. After that, no matter how well my interviews went I did not get hired. That's okay, because I ended up in a district that fit me better. :)
     
  39. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jun 24, 2007

    I think internships or long-term sub positions in lieu of subbing are an excellent and appropriate alternative for people with classroom experience.

    Most new grads, however, have little or no classroom experience. While they may (or may not...) know plenty about the standards and curriculum and writing a lesson plan, they need lots of help with the daily management of a classroom. They need to learn how to take attendance, set up and enforce classroom rules, notice and address off-task behaviors, and a slew of other things that you just can't learn out of a book. Cooperating teachers are a wonderful resource in this respect! Student teachers can see how it's actually done so that they don't need to reinvent the proverbial wheel in their own classroom later.
     
  40. DaveF

    DaveF Companion

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    Jun 24, 2007

    For me, student teaching was a great chance to learn. There was someone there to throw me a life preserver if needed. Years ago, when I learned to fly, I never would have dreamed about trying that without an instructor by my side for the first few hours. I feel the same about student teaching.
     
  41. CatieCat

    CatieCat Rookie

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    Jun 25, 2007

    I would student teach if I were you. I feel that my student teaching experience prepared me to be an entry level teacher. My student teaching experience taught me so much because I had the opportunity to work with a teacher who had taught for 30 years! I really can't imagine going into my first year of teaching without my student teaching experience. You learn so much that you want to do and so much that you DON'T want to do. I feel so much more confident having student taught!
     

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