Teach HS Math Without Certification? Advice?

Discussion in 'High School' started by AlgeBro, May 5, 2020.

  1. AlgeBro

    AlgeBro Guest

    May 5, 2020

    Over three decades ago, I attended education graduate school and then, for years, taught high school math abroad. I loved it and, I believe, my students appreciated me (now, as adults, they are the biggest portion of my Facebook friends). But, sadly, I felt that my pay was going to create a challenge for me and my family, once I were to have one. So, I left teaching.

    I have been involved in helping kids learn for over ten years, from lots of volunteer and some paid tutoring (much of both online) to homeschooling our younger son to creating and running enrichment classes for our kids' school.

    I'm now at a point in my life where I can stop my current work and return to the classroom. I believe there is a strong demand for capable high school math teachers. But, I do not have credentials and I don't think I can spend years getting them.

    I'm in San Francisco. Can anyone give me tips on how I might be able to land a high school math teaching job for this coming year? What I might need to to establish my credibility in the job?

    Thanks much!
     
  2.  
  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,376
    Likes Received:
    808

    May 5, 2020

    I'm not in California, but I guess I have a couple of questions. First, is there a huge shortage of high school math teachers in your area?

    Second, have you obtained official copies of all of your transcripts and do you have (or can you get) a copy of your last teacher certificate? You will also need official scores from the teaching exams you passed the last time -- and many of those have changed. Some districts even allow really high scores on the SAT to take the place of CBEST or Praxis, but you have to actually have the documents. Most states will not accept scores that are more than 10 years old regardless, and you have to retake them. You will need these in order to get evaluated by the California Department of Education. This process takes a while, so if you don't already have these things, you need to factor in a number of weeks time to obtain them. Some times of the year, it doesn't take long to get an answer from the DOE, but from May through September, they are swamped with new graduates and teacher renewals. It often takes 2 months or more to get a response during this time of year.

    You also need to realize that right now is when schools are filling teaching positions for next year. Look at the districts near you where you would like to teach. Call them on the phone, the HR department, and just ask "Do you accept non-certified teachers on an emergency-permit in a high needs area, such as high school math?" In some parts of the country they are desperate enough to do this. In other parts they won't even consider it. Instead of wondering, why not call the districts and ask them outright?

    I hope someone who teaches high school math in the San Francisco area can give more insight, but I'd think it is highly unlikely that you'd have your ducks in a row in time to teach for the 2020-2021 school year. There are so many new requirements that have to be met -- being ELL certified, passing a course on recognizing child abuse, working with special needs students, etc -- and those all add more time to the process.
     
    AlgeBro and bella84 like this.
  4. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,376
    Likes Received:
    808

    May 5, 2020

    According to their website, SF district does sometimes take emergency permits for high needs areas, and to learn about credentialing for high school, single subject go to https://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/teach-secondary.

    I also found that right now the California Department of Education is working on questions and certifications sent to them prior to 2/24/2020 -- So they are a little more than 2 months delayed right now (and right now is when the serious delays start) so if you need an emergency permit, you can plan on a 2-3 month wait to get it, minimum.

    I know when I moved states and applied for a certificate in my new state, I had a question, and I submitted it to them via email (they would not accept questions by phone) and it took them 3 and a half months to respond to my email. Just pointing out the reality of things.
     
    AlgeBro likes this.
  5. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    Messages:
    690
    Likes Received:
    189

    May 5, 2020

    I am a high school math teacher in SF. My school is conducting interviews now for next year. All of our math candidates are credentialed, so while there may not be a glut of candidates, there are some.

    Based on your experience and education, you might be able to get a one year emergency credential and teach while the state processes your paperwork. I suggest you contact SFUSD's HR department and ask them if they might review your paperwork and transcripts and employment records, and see if they would be interested in supporting you in that process.

    Another option would be to look at private schools. Some of the independent privates care less about education credentials. Their hiring season is generally earlier than ours, but there are usually a few openings late in the game. Many of them hire through CalWest or other hiring consultants.
     
    AlgeBro and CaliforniaRPCV like this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. SpecialPreskoo
Total: 267 (members: 3, guests: 238, robots: 26)
test