Tattling

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by beckywithasmile, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. beckywithasmile

    beckywithasmile Rookie

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    Apr 18, 2008

    Hello,
    I subbed today in a first grade classroom and was a little overwhelmed by the amount of tattling that happened in the room. It's been a couple of weeks since I subbed for first grade, but I don't remember it being this bad.

    What can I do in the future to help stop/reduce the amount of tattling that happens when I sub?
     
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  3. MsX

    MsX Companion

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    Apr 18, 2008

    i tell my kids that I don't like to hear tattles. I tell them the only time you should tattle is if someone is hurt or will get hurt. I explain to them that tattling really isnt being kind because you're trying to get the other person in trouble. It takes them a while but eventually they get it.

    In past years I've used a tattle box. It's a place where they can write their tattles down so they don't interrupt class. That might not be effective if you're only in a classroom one day though.

    good luck! tattling is definitely an issue for first graders!
     
  4. cMcD

    cMcD Groupie

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    Apr 18, 2008

    I have a tattle ear. If they come with a tattle I stop them and tell them to go tell the ear. I drew a giant ear on pink paper and taped it to a wall in my room.

    You can also use a picture of the president. Tell them to go tell the president.

    I learned these at a conference on disruptive students.
     
  5. beckywithasmile

    beckywithasmile Rookie

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    Apr 19, 2008

    I LOVE that idea! Can you imagnine the reaction of the students when I pull out a picture of the president and say go tell him . . . lol. And the teachers . . . here I come a sub and the one prop I bring with me is a pic of the president. I bet I'll get plenty of laughs with that one - but that's ok if it works.
     
  6. MrsPatten

    MrsPatten Comrade

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    Apr 19, 2008

    Last year I had a tattle box where they wrote it down. After about a week it really slowed down. For those die hard tattlers that wouldn't quit, I added a Compliment Box where they had to write down something nice about the person they were telling on.

    This year I just move clothespins. Another teachers threatens that they'll have to wear a "Tattle Tail."

    Next year I think I'll use that "Tell it to the President." I'll probably use Washington so nobody thinks I'm supporting any current politician.
     
  7. cMcD

    cMcD Groupie

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    Apr 19, 2008

    The guy that led the conference said that he says, "Wow, that sounds really important. Why don't you go tell the president? He listens to important things."
     
  8. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Apr 19, 2008

    I tried the president thing too. I said "I'm just the teacher, that sounds important, go tell the president" :LOL This year I have been teaching them to solve their own problems. I ask them to talk about it with the person that did whatever it is, tell them which rule they broke, and to as them stop doing whatever it is. After that, they can tell me about it. It usually stops the tattling when I say "I didn't do (it), did you ask (whoever) to stop?". They know that's what I'm going to say, so they hardly bother. :2up:
     
  9. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    Apr 19, 2008

    several members here had some great ideas in another post regarding tattling...my very favorite one was have a mirror with you and have them tattle to the mirror.

    a funny one...have a picture of the president and have them tell tattle to the president.

    if you work in a catholic school...have a pic of the pope and have them tattle to the pope.

    Have fun!
     
  10. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

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    Apr 19, 2008

    I don't have a suggestion to add, however, I do know my first graders would do this to the subs, because they thought they could get away with it. Once one child did, then a whole flood of tattlers emerged.
     
  11. WonderW05

    WonderW05 Comrade

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    Apr 19, 2008

    yes, I agree tattling is a huge thing in first grade. I was bombarded the first three months of school, but we sat down and talked about it and the whole emergency thing and all. It fluctuates in my room from time to time.
     
  12. Teach in Tampa

    Teach in Tampa Rookie

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    Apr 29, 2008

    I heard a cute suggestion at a conference in regards to handling tattles. This idea is similar to the president's picture. Post a picture of Whoopi Goldberg and direct students to the picture when they tell you minor/meaningless tattles. Tell them "Whooooppppiiiii ... go tell her!" It's hard to know if you catch my tone so I'll be specific - you say it as "Whoopi, who cares." I thought this was a hilarious idea but haven't tried it yet.
     
  13. flowerpower31

    flowerpower31 Comrade

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    May 20, 2008

    I LOVE the "tell it to the president" thing. I also love the writing it down thing. That would probably work best. I may have to try that for next year.

    For this year, their rule is that they get one tattle a day unless someone is hurting them. I started this in the middle of the year because the tattling in my class room got ridiculous. Setting the one-a-day limit seems to have helped.
     
  14. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    May 20, 2008

    I have the children develop a mind your own business rule. I also clarify that if something is hurtful then it becomes their business so that is an ok time to let me know. If something does not hurt them then it is time to worry about themselves.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2008
  15. Mommateach

    Mommateach Rookie

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    May 21, 2008

  16. jaszmyn

    jaszmyn Comrade

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    May 21, 2008

    I actually teach kindergarten so you KNOW I hear tattling allll day. This year, as soon as a student comes up to me and I sense the tattling, I calmly say "Are you about to tell me something about you?" If they answer no then I ask "Is someone hurting someone? "Did someone hurt you?" By the time I finish with all my questioning most of them have forgotten what it was they wanted. Really in about two months, they all knew what I was going to say when they came up to me...and they totally stopped!! It was the greatest hing.

    My advice is to get a phrase or whatever "tell the president, Is someone hurt? ...." And use it consistently for three weeks, and the students will eventually back off, becuase they know what to expect...before they even get there.

    This approach might not work well for a one day sub...but I just thought I would throw my method out there.
     
  17. Teach in Tampa

    Teach in Tampa Rookie

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    May 21, 2008

    A friend recently gave me a great suggestion for handling tattlers. I took her advice and it works great with my first graders. I explained the difference between a teacher problem and a student problem. A teacher problem is something the teacher needs to know about, i.e. someone is hurt or being unsafe. I then explained that a student problem is when someone else is doing something wrong (i.e. not doing their work, cutting in line, chewing gum). I explained and modeled how to resolve minor conflicts. We did a few role play activities and played a game to decipher between teacher and student problems. The whole activity took about 30 minutes and was well worth the time. Now, when they come up to me and I sense a tattle coming on, I simply say, "Is this a teacher problem or a student problem?" If it's a teacher problem they proceed to fill me in on the situation and if it's a student problem they just walk away and work on fixing it on their own. Surprisingly enough, they are able to distinguish between a student problem and a teacher problem 99% of the time. It has been great!! I highly recommend this strategy!
     
  18. educator

    educator Rookie

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    May 21, 2008

    I think that the current atmosphere in schools encourages tattling. By refusing to allow children to work out their differences, their only defense is to tattle.

    I'm a firm believer in the fact that even young children follow certain behaviors. If you allow 15 children to interact over a period of time, a "pecking order" will emerge. If left to develop, the children will learn through natural consequences which behaviors are counterproductive. Bossy Betty will soon learn that the other girls don't appreciate here bossiness, and if she wants to play she'll have to change her style. As long as the behavior isn't physical, any adult interference should be in the form of guidance - as a teacher, you notice Betty's bossiness and perhaps integrate a discussion of the behavior into a character lesson (without pointing Betty out of course). This allows the children to monitor their own behavior, and doesn't require them to monitor and report on the behavior of other students in order to enjoy the social aspect of the classroom setting.

    Naturally, if a student's behavior is physical or violent, there should be consequences. But the other children should first be allowed to work it out with close supervision if it can be done safely. This teaches a child to be assertive without being aggressive, and it teaches the aggressive child that there are those unwilling to tolerate his behavior. The interaction also teaches the passive child how to handle conflict, thereby keeping him from being the eternal "victim".

    This doesn't come from a textbook, it comes from summers at Grandma's with 11 other grandchildren having about a five year age spread. No one ever did any major damage, and by the time we became teenagers we were capable of not only working together as a team of 12, we were able to resolve differences in a socially acceptable manner. Grandma's rule - don't run and tell, stay and figure it out.

    I like the big ear idea, if there are children who have been trained to tattle, it provides an outlet for the irrepressible urge to "TELL".
     

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