Tattling

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by burgandy01, Aug 5, 2014.

  1. burgandy01

    burgandy01 Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2014

    It looks like I may get a job teaching kindergarten. There are so many great things about teaching this age but one drawback is the 'constant' tattling.
    I've seen lessons online about when it's important to tell and when comments should be ignored or mutually resolved--- but I also don't want Johnny getting away with calling Sally ugly (or what have you).
    It's also so hard when I don't know what happened because both kids deny allegations or point to the other.

    Advice is appreciated :help:.
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Aug 6, 2014

    I have found the best way to deal with this is to be proactive. I heavily teach what is kindness, how to be a good friend, and recognizing feeling. I very rarely am the one to directly address a situation like Johnny called Sally ugly, and instead coach kids on how to handle it. I would ask Sally if she told Johnny how that made her feel, and if needed, ask Johnny how he thinks that made her feel and how he plans on making her feel better. I model direct phrases the kids can use if they struggle with this, and often hear these phrases later on without prompting. Sure, sometimes you'll have a kid with issues that need to be handled more directly, but this works with most kids most of the time.
     
  4. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Aug 6, 2014

    Oh, and congratulations! :D
     
  5. beckyeduk8er

    beckyeduk8er Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2014

    When kids come to tattle in kindergarten it's important to think of it as any other skill that needs to be taught. Just like reading some kiddos will learn it quickly and others will needs lots of support. I always ask "did you like that?" If they say no I give them the words. "I don't like it when you push me next time say please move." "I don't like it when you take the ball away next time say can play too?" "I don't like it when you call me ugly. My name is Becky call me Becky." You always want to you the pattern. I don't like it when you __________ next time ____________ (this should be a positive) With some kids it's enough to give them the language, with others they need to practice saying it me me in an assertive voice (our school councilor does a lesson on this type of voice)-not an angry voice or a whiny voice. With other kids after they practice with me I will need to walk over with them to talk with the offender. By about November most kindergartners answer no and tun around and talk to that person without needing the language. This year I had kiddo that still needed me to walk with them in May and that's okay If I child says "yes" when I ask if they like it I just reply "OK" and the child moves on. If it is something serious I intervene even if they say yes.
     
  6. burgandy01

    burgandy01 Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2014

    Thanks :)!

    Thanks so much for the advice.
     
  7. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Aug 7, 2014

    As long as you don't cater to every tattle-it will happen less and less often. As others have said if you give them the tools to handle it themselves they start to do that. "Johnny's picking his nose"-I would just say "hand him a tissue". The child is trying to get you to fuss at Johnny so if you don't do that there was nothing in it for them. You'll get to know them and who to believe-often you can tell just by their body language.
     

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