task analysis

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by clary21, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. clary21

    clary21 Rookie

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    Jul 29, 2005

    Has anybody used task analysis in their classroom? How did it work? Is it successful?
     
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  3. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Jul 30, 2005

    I find informal task analysis to be indispensable in my classroom. I teach a grade 1-3 multi-handicapped/life skills class, and my students are low cognitively. Complex directions are demanding, both communication and attention wise, so I break down most of our tasks.

    For repeated daily activities like handwashing, I have charts that use Mayer-Johnson picture symbols, one symbol for each step (ie water on, get soap, rub hands, rinse hands, water off, get paper towel, dry hands, throw away towel). When a task like handwashing is broken down into steps that are consistently presented in the same way, and with the same cues, it helps the students to remember them--after turning water off, get a paper towel, etc.--because it is a predictable sequence.

    Task analysis is also excellent for children with communication delays of any sort. If you are working on developing language skills, you are putting the language of each step into bite-size chunks, so to speak. Not sure if this is the standard way, but I put only one verb and one noun in each step or chunk--so, "cut a circle and a square" is too much, it should be 2 "cut a circle. cut a square." because they are two separate actions.

    I use task analysis for all of my art and cooking projects. What works for me is I have a few flip photo albums, and I print out my project steps on boardmaker, then slip them into the sleeves--one step is showing per page, and no step can be more than 3 symbols long. The first step is usually "get supplies", followed by one supply per page. (glue, paper, etc). Then "paint paper" "glue eyes", whatever. This works well for my class.

    Task analysis the way we do it definitely slows down our day significantly, but it allows my students more independence, especially in their activities of daily living, which is one of my major goals for them.

    Does this help? (or even make sense? it's a bit late!) How do other people use task analysis?
     
  4. clary21

    clary21 Rookie

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    Jul 31, 2005

    This is of great help. I know we always have to look at the terminal behavior first (goal) so we know where we want them to go. Thanks.
     

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