Talking Students...HELP

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by katydid205, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. katydid205

    katydid205 Companion

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    Oct 11, 2009

    I love each and every one of my students individually. They are great kids. I have 18 of them. They LOVE each other so much that ALL THEY DO IS TALK. I have tried rewarding individual tables by earning "tokens", individual student rewards, etc. etc. etc. Nothing is helping. They have the hardest time lining up to go anywhere. ALL THEY DO IS TALK to each other. During tests, etc. This is my 8th year teaching and I've always been able to manage their talking. This year i am having no luck. Any advice??? Thank you!
     
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  3. kacieann

    kacieann Companion

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    Oct 11, 2009

    Have you looked at Whole Brain Teaching? There is a link on this forum. It allows for students to talk, but you control when they talk. There are also special rules for the students lining up. I am planning on using the timed students lining up this week. It is basically a game for when the students line up.
     
  4. tgim

    tgim Habitué

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    Oct 11, 2009

    I find that if I catch the ones who aren't talking (maybe just 1 in this case), and send them on ahead to Art/Music/etc., it sends a strong message to my talkers. You might have to go to lining up boy/girl, even for lunch, to make your point. I have even had those who are the worst line-talkers stay in at recess to write a paragraph or letter to the art teacher to apologize for making us late. Their letter has to have 1 detail for each minute we are late. (Dear _____, I am sorry we were late to art again. It is important for us to be on time because you have planned a lesson or activity for us. We might not get to finish, and this will make your job harder. We should be there on time so we can __________. Sincerely, _______)

    During tests - NO TALKING is allowed PERIOD. When students finish, my kids can finally handle sitting and reading in the silent reading area (this is my 2nd year with them) without talking at all. If someone does talk (even whispering), s/he automatically moves his/her behavior token (horse in my room this year) TWO levels, and they fill out a "behavior reflection form" which goes home to be signed by a parent. I am quite serious about respecting those who are finishing their tests. These students also miss recess - to fill out the form.

    You might want to sit down and have a meeting w/ your entire class. Discuss your frustrations and have them brainstorm a list of reasons why this talking is impacting their education. Get them to help you come up w/ ideas for changing things.

    You might also look at Power Teaching, now Whole Brain Teaching, and look for the class/yes and classroom rules portion. I tried this last year and the class loved it!! I don't need to be quite so strict w/ the rules this year because they know what is expected.
     
  5. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

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    Oct 11, 2009

    I like the class meeting idea. You need to explain to them WHY you need them to not talk, this way it has meaning. Once you do this - get firm. If they talk, they get a warning - and then there has to be a consequence. I use a 'Take a Break' chair - it sounds better than 'Time Out' - I explain they need a break and can't come back until they are ready to follow the rules. For MOST kids, this works very well. If I have a few that this doesn't work for, I usually do a behavior chart for that child and work individually with them on it.
     
  6. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Oct 11, 2009

    I have a second grade class that consists of 19 boys and 10 girls. In the beginning weeks of school, they seemed to be non-stop talkers. I spent time analyzing when they were talking, and came up with strategies to deal with it. As a result, the talking has been greatly reduced.

    Here are the strategies I've used:

    During transition times: I tell them that when I say "go", they are to take out their white boards, markers and erasers (or whatever is needed for the lesson), and fold their hands with no talking. I then praise those who have not moved, because they are following directions and waiting for the "go" signal. If I need them to open to a book page, I will tell them the page and then say, "What page?" They respond in unison with the page number. Then I say go, and immediately I find someone who has done this without talking and tell them to put a marble in the jar (for a class party) or put a star on the board next to their table number. The tables that have the most stars at the end of the day get to line up first. If there are any stragglers, which is rare because they are all excited to do this quickly, I put their names on the board to be last to line up (they made the class wait, so now they will have to wait for the class).

    As simple as the above procedure sounds, these young children respond very well to it. They really hate being last to get in line, and a hush falls over the room when someone's name goes on the board. They also love to put marbles in the jar or put their own star on the board, getting to choose whatever color marker they want to put it up there.

    Getting them in line quietly involves sitting anyone down who speaks. These offenders then also have to wait until everyone else is lined up before they can get in line. If the line is noisy walking down the hall, we turn around and start over.

    During tests, I let them know that if anyone is talking, I will have to think that they are telling someone the answers to the test, and since this is cheating, I will have to give them a zero. So far, we have had silence during tests.

    Good luck with whatever methods you try. I've been there and know how frustrating it can be to deal with all of that conversation.
     

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