Talking NonStop in 5th grade

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by LS31582, Nov 24, 2009.

  1. LS31582

    LS31582 Rookie

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    Nov 24, 2009

    I have a very large class this year, 27 kids, and it has been very challenging in many ways. I really enjoy the personalities in my room and they are all great kids, but they talk nonstop! I can not seem to get anything to work for these kids. A lot of time is wasted due to the talking and we do not get to everything we need to. They are very disruptive to other classes with the talking in the halls and disrespectful to me while talking during lessons and independent time. I have tried both taking away things like recess, and have tried positive things, but nothing seems to help. Does anyone have any advice or suggestions??
     
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  3. wrice

    wrice Habitué

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    Nov 25, 2009

    My thoughts are to let em talk. Give them things to talk about. Chit chat with them. Who cares if they are talking during independent time as long as it is with an inside voice and not too far off topic. Kids get desensitized to teachers that constantly nag them to be quiet.

    But when it comes time for lecture or to transition, demand quiet. Blink the lights or count down from three and then nail anyone still talking. Single them out and give them a consequence like sitting by the teacher's desk or staying in from recess. You'll have to come down hard, stern, fair, and consistent, for a couple weeks, but soon the kids will realize when they're expected to be quiet.

    Good luck! I remember when I had to teach 25-30 kid classes and it was indeed very challenging.
     
  4. noreenk

    noreenk Cohort

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    Nov 25, 2009

    I had a crazy chatty class last year and some serious chatterboxes this year... Like wrice said, let 'em talk in class as long as it's on task. My students LOVE group/partner work, but I make them accountable for the quality of it and they've started to make much smarter choices about who they choose to work with. I also try to space out my kids as much as possible -although I can't imagine how much space you have with 27 kids! During silent independent work, I tell them they can work literally anywhere as long as they're working: on the floor, sitting on their desk, on the carpet, etc. Not working means they have to either sit by me or at their desk. My students are also crazy about music... some groups are willing to quiet down during work time if I play something they like.

    Another system that's worked very well for me during lectures/transition times is table points. Generally they work toward a pizza party, but sometimes I let the students decide if they want something else. I tally points throughout the day, and can remove them if a table is being particularly disruptive or is not on-task. The winner at the end of the day gets a topping on a huge pizza I made; in order for the class to win the reward, each table must contribute a certain number of toppings, and the table w/the fewest # must bring beverages and the table w/the highest # can choose to bring dessert. After introducing it, I am very generous with points/toppings - then get stricter about my expectations as they get closer to meeting the goal and they get used to demonstrating point-worthy behavior.
     
  5. 5thGrRio

    5thGrRio New Member

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    Dec 3, 2009

    We have a very talktive class of 25 students

    Here are a few suggestions.
    1) Draw a Sun on the board with all names in it. As they miss behave you withdraw their name as they behave include them back on the sun.
    Throughout the week give them WOWs for good behavior.(WOWS are little pieces of paper spelled the word WOW on it. They'll write their names on it and dump it in a box or cup.
    At the end of the week draw 5 names out of the box. If their names are out of the Sun and gets drawn they won't get a prize. If the names drawn are in the Sun and they get drawn they get a prize.
    Have a nice prize box available in your classroom with boys and girls prizes(stickers, favors, candy) have them walk to the magic prize box and pick.
    2) Give them jobs: such as Self elf, Fedex, Plant care etc.. finf a job per child. At the end of the week pay them with school class cash.
    However if their names are not in the Sun they won't get to go shopping with the money they earn.
    If you are interested on those ideas I'll be happy to send you some complementary info.
     
  6. hoku625

    hoku625 Rookie

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    Dec 4, 2009

    They are 5th grade so they need to understand that there is a consequence for talking when they should be learning. So teach a lesson (obviously not an important lesson) about something they know nothing about and let them talk, then give an assessment on the lesson. The instructions for the assessment should be verbal and it should be something that will be difficult to do.

    When they don't know what to do, say, "oh, I'm sorry, you were talking when I was teaching that lesson and I'm not going to repeat the instructions or give you that information again. Now you know what happens if you don't listen." You may have to do this several times or just tell them that you're not repeating information, they need to find out from someone else. It doesn't take long and they realize that there is a time to socialize and there's a time to learn.

    You have to be firm and stick with it, don't repeat information when they are talking, don't try to talk over them, etc. I also use this when they ask me to go to the bathroom when I'm teaching. They quickly change their minds about drinking water and going to the bathroom until I'm done with the lesson or giving instructions.
     
  7. dumbdiety

    dumbdiety Comrade

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    Dec 6, 2009

    Like noreenk, I use table points. I give and take points for all sorts of things, like completing homework, not talking, etc. If students get a certain amount of points, they get Achievements that I post on the wall. Every Friday we have "Fun Friday" where everyone gets to just take 30 minutes and have fun in class with their friends. The table with the highest points get first dibs on items, the the 2nd, and etc. EVERYONE wants to be first since I bring in Lego Rock Band to play! I've tried many things, but the points thing works the best (so far)!
     
  8. tchrmommy1

    tchrmommy1 Rookie

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    Dec 27, 2009

    I'm right there with you. 33 students - 22 boys and 11 girls. They talk all the time! But I figure if that is my worst behavior problem, than I'm doing ok. I just make sure I am consistent with the rules and I do give them time to talk when appropriate.
     
  9. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Jan 1, 2010

    I have 4 tables of students and I give them 2-3 minute to talk about the lesson--- then they are responsible for doing a mini presentation and sharing what their group said. I usually give them 1 extra minute to chat during these group discussions and then I begin once I see all 4 table groups are chatting instead of discussing the topic before beginning.

    Kids this age need time to be social and I know its a huge pain, but if you can plan in breaks into your lesson (1 minutes here and there like I do), it'll help sub-side the chatting I've found.
     
  10. round stanley

    round stanley Companion

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    Jan 28, 2010

    Just for fun, when a talkative student wants to talk with me I just start blabbing about anything. I don't stop until the student demands to be heard. Then I make my point. It works for a while with some students and has actually cured a few of the kids who are quick on the uptake.
     

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