Talking and how to get it to STOP

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by steacher1, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. steacher1

    steacher1 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2012
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 31, 2012

    I recently graduated and completed my degree with Mathematics Education. I completed my student teaching in middle school and high school last May and have several questions!!

    How do you start off the school year to show the students that you mean business?

    How do you get them to respect you?

    How do you tell the whole class when the bell rings, that means stop talking? I've tried numerous ways while doing student teaching and nothing seemed to work. Middle school was the hardest. High school students seemed more respectful than middle school. In the middle school setting and after one warning, I wrote them up. After that if they kept on talking, I sent them to the hall which I hated doing!! I've sent them directly to the dean. I mean I was a lost cause! My classroom teacher just told me to "have the confidence", and that I did better without him around...but I still felt like I was beating a dead horse.
     
  2.  
  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2012

    You start off the year teaching the procedures that you expect students to follow. Then you reinforce the procedures throughout the year.

    Then spend every minute of every class teaching or learning. If you use the time to instruct students, they will not have time to talk about anything other than the subject matter at hand.
     
  4. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,931
    Likes Received:
    1,123

    Feb 2, 2012

    I second what Mopar said.
    Also, remember that you are never a lost cause, you can start over every day! If a strategy works, keep it, if not, adapt it or change it. You can start a new day every day by saying, "This is how we'll do it from now on..".
    I do this all the time, and have no problems (or they're not anything I can't handle :) ). In my school there is no beginning or ending of the year, it's year round, students come and go any time (detention), so it's a little harder, I think. So I treat every day as a new day / first day, and try to stay on top of things: communicate your expectations, consistently enforce them, and don't back down if they challenge you. That will earn you respect and will get them to listen to you.
     
  5. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2012

    You really have to stay on top of things. Set your consequences and stick to them. You talk - you get to stay after. No exceptions. After you tighten the screws on a few of them, they will realize that you mean business and the others should fall in line.
     
  6. samrangel

    samrangel Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2012

    I've taught middle school kids for over 20 years, and you're right. These are the toughest years for a new teacher or for any teacher, but these can also be the best years to teach, because you can make such a difference. That's why I've taught only middle school.

    The beginning of a happy class is an quality lesson plan. I know the worst classes I've had were a direct result of my "winging it."
    Creating a lesson plan that is engaging to all students takes hours of preparation and planning. It takes understanding the needs and interests of your students. It takes work.

    Most middle school students want to be active in a classroom - some more than others. I would create lessons that involved getting up, going outside, writing, sharing ideas, etc. This, again, took hours of prep time, but once it's prepared, you can pretty much use it again and again for different lessons.

    Keeping middle school students quiet for more than 20 minutes is next to impossible, and it's really tough for math class, because of the direct teaching that has to be done, but I would encourage you to spend a couple of hours creating a plan that will keep your students engaged, and you'll see a change.

    I hope this helps.

    Thanks,

    Sam
     
  7. ciounoi

    ciounoi Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Messages:
    593
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2012

    Also, I'd just like to mention that the talking issues happened during your student teaching. Don't kid yourself into thinking you won't have any issues once you get a teaching position, but on the other hand, student teachers aren't always seen as people in positions of authority, either. I had a heck of a time with some of my classes during student teaching, but it improved quite a bit when I had my own classroom, simply by virtue of NOT being a student teacher anymore!

    Follow the advice above... and don't beat yourself up over the kids talking during student teaching! You'll improve as you go.
     
  8. steacher1

    steacher1 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2012
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2012

    thank you for all your feedback.
     
  9. SetterHugger85

    SetterHugger85 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2012
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 4, 2012

    My favorite grade student teaching was 6th grade...I currently sub. To answer the how to get them to stop talking when the bell rings, in my case every class was different, but I had an array of bellringers that we did every day. One of their favorites was the "first word" activity....for example, if two days ago we learned about sponges, I would write "SPONGE" vertically down the board and students would come up with descriptions and phrases for each letter:

    S-picules are the framework of a sponge.
    P
    O
    N
    G
    E

    :)
     
  10. leeaton

    leeaton New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 11, 2012

    I have the same problem!

    I teach 7th grade Language Arts at a Title 1 school, and I am experiencing the same difficulties in one of my periods. I have tried every recommendation that has come my way: positive behavior support, re-teaching my expectations and class rules, incorporating group activities to allow them to talk. Yet the students still speak while I am speaking. Every single day, I have to stop while I am giving a direction, to address a talking issue. It's so many students that I cannot discipline or point out everyone who is talking. Last week, the teacher next door came in and told them that they were out of control, and he could hear them in his classroom. That was humiliating!:unsure: I know that I have the classroom management tools because all other periods rarely if ever speak while I am speaking. If you find the answer, let me know!!
     
  11. AFine

    AFine Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2010
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 11, 2012

    This is my first year teaching. I teach 7th grade math. The first 5 minutes they have a bell ringer. Some students settle down faster than others, but most quickly realize there isn't time to finish your bell ringer if you don't get started pretty quick. Students get quiet during my direct teaching, but if I am having issues with talking, my WBT Scoreboard helps a lot. It is a point on my side of the scoreboard which means they have more homework. I would highly recommend looking at Whole Brain Teaching strategies for this. At the same time, I still have some issues with students talking out, and I wish I had been more consistent at saying "No Talking While I'm Talking" at the beginning of the year.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. MissCeliaB,
  2. paul4422,
  3. Clement K. Rudder
Total: 178 (members: 4, guests: 159, robots: 15)
test