taking students home

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by teacherkasey, Dec 13, 2002.

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Would you take one of your students to your home for a personal visit?

  1. Yes, it wouldn't change the teacher/student relationship.

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  2. No, it would change the teacher/student relationship.

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  1. teacherkasey

    teacherkasey Cohort

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    Dec 13, 2002

    I teach full day Kindergarten in a private day care center. A couple of the teachers (including the team teacher I work with) ocassionally take students home with them. This isn't like giving them a ride home... it's taking the kids to their houses, taking them to dinner, to Chuck E. Cheese, etc. I don't know if I would feel comfortable doing this. I mean, the parents are giving their permission but what uf something happened to the child? Is the school in any way responsible? And what does that do to the teacher/child relationship in the classroom? (The person I team teach with took one of our students and her little sister out to dinner tonight) I would be afraid the child would look at me more as a friend or that they could get away with more in school because they had been to my house... Any thoughts?:confused:
     
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  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Dec 13, 2002

    A lot of teachers at my daycare do that also. Personally I don't because I work two jobs and need a break to keep my sanity. although the teachers that do this are still their teachers and they still have to respect them and follow rules, they do seem to favor those teachers a little. They always ask if they can go to their rooms. Theis week my collegue kept the asst. dir's. daughter for all week while she and her husband were on a cruise. She stole some lipgloss and took it to school. This child whined all week. I don't think they are ever going to do that agian.
     
  4. AngelaS

    AngelaS Cohort

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    Dec 14, 2002

    I knew a HeadStart teacher who taught in one of the roughest neighborhoods you can imagine. The site was in a public housing development. Several of he parents would 'forget' to pick up their kids and the kids would stay the night at the teacher's house throughout the week and (maybe) be picked up on Friday. She routinely took 5 to 10 other kids to McDonalds, etc. before walking them home in the p.m. Most of them spent the night at her house at one time or another.

    While I envy her dedication, I would never do this personally (even a less extreme version) because of legal repurcussions. I am quite sure that if the parent decided they wanted some money, they would have numerous opportunties to claim their young children were sexually or physically abused, came home with drugs in the their pockets (that has actually been in the new lately), etc. If the child got hurt, I am afraid I would lose my job. We are not allowed to take kids home from school with us because the school would be liable if we were in an accident, so I doubt very much that the union would support other outside-of-school- activities.

    Sad, sad, world, isn't it?:(
     
  5. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Dec 14, 2002

    All new teachers to our district have to take a "personal ethics" inservice. Basically it tells the stuff we can and cannot do within legal and ethical boundaries. There would be no way we would be allowed to bring children home with us. We are not even allowed to take children home (to their own home) after school if they didn't get picked up. Certain members of the staff may do so (mostly guidance counselors and SRO's). The list of things that we are not allowed to do is endless. We may not tutor children, accept gifts over a certain amount, etc. Earlier this year, a parent invited my husband and myself to dinner (on company money) to get to know me better. I ran this by my principal first to make sure it was ethical. I was told as long as it is a one time only occurance there is no problem. It is not to become a recurring situation. I agree with Angela - it is a sad world when we, as teachers, can not be trusted to take care of children outside of the classroom and we have to watch every word, step and action we take for possible reprecussions.
     
  6. AngelaS

    AngelaS Cohort

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    Dec 14, 2002

    Very interesting about the no-tutoring rule, Margo. Who do the parents get to tutor their kids? I know many, many teachers who rely on the $20-$40 an hour they get for tutoring students. I don't think you can tutor your own students, out of conflict of interest (what if the teacher didn't teach well during school hours so s/he have more students to collect tutoring fees from, which I hope would never happen) but they do tutor other kids from the school and neighborhood.
     
  7. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Dec 14, 2002

    I believe that teachers may tutor other students but not their own (for the reasons you stated). And I believe the parents must go through the school to set up tutoring (as opposed to direct contact with the teacher). But I have never tutored so I am not sure of the exact details.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 15, 2002

    We have a 'buddy program' through the guidance dept. in my school where teachers are partnered up with students that for one reason or another could benefit from an adult 'buddy' relationship. We meet with buddies at lunchtimes mostly- some once a week, some a few times a month. I eat lunch with my buddy and play math games, go on computer, talk. Every now and then I might partner up with another teacher and her buddy and walk, at lunch time to the local fast food to treat the kids to lunch. (With prior parent permission) We never take kids in the cars, and the buddy partnerships are with parent permission. I think that you run the risk of 'looking like a babysitter' if you do some of the things mentioned in previous posts- thus blurring the 'professionalism' line.
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Dec 21, 2002

    Yes. I have worked in daycare for 3 or 4 years and I have babysit for a few of the kids at times and at least one time, I had a child come to my house. For the most part, I've never had a problem with it. I've had kids who I became very close to (who had never been to my house or vice versa) and I've always been able to be proffessional and no one would have ever even known that we had a relationship outside of the normal class-time relationship.

    I did have one kid (age 2.5) who was in my class and was full-time (M-F 8:15-5:15) an I would baby-sit him every Friday night right afters school until he went to bed and after a few times, I think he kind of got sick of seeimg me all the time and not his parents, so in that way it could get to be a problem.
     
  10. teacherkasey

    teacherkasey Cohort

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    Dec 21, 2002

    Not Babysitting

    Let me clarify... these teachers that are taking children home are not babysitting them. They choose to take these children with them, they take them out to dinner, to Check E. Cheese, the movies, to their house, etc.

    That's great that you can maintain that professional line with these kids. I just think that with the older children (I have KG) that it would blur that line.

    Thanks for the resonse.

    Kasey:p
     

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