Taking notes in class

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Caesar753, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jul 17, 2007

    Our school is a law preparatory magnet school, and we're encouraged (read: required) to incorporate Cornell-style notes into our daily classroom activities.

    Cornell notes are the kind where you draw a vertical line down the middle of your paper. The right side is used for taking notes, and the left is used for giving main points or writing questions afterward. You do a summary at the bottom of the page or at the end of each set of notes.

    We called these "T-notes" when I was in middle school, and I never used them after that.

    For those of you who have students take notes in class, I have some questions.

    1. Do you require them to take notes in a particular style?

    2. Do you provide notes verbatim? If so, do you post them on an overhead or write them on the board?

    3. How much do you think taking notes helps your students?

    4. Do you check notes or give points for taking notes?

    5. How do you personally take notes? Do you review your notes once you've taken them?
     
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  3. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Jul 17, 2007

    1. No. I suggest that they abbreviate, use short hand, and not write in complete sentces but bullets. I suggest listing the topic of notes as the title and the listing the first subtopic and bullets of information following it, the second subtopic, then bullets regarding that subtopic, etc.
    2. My notes are done using a Power Point Presentation using a TV or smartboard with pictures, videos, and sometimes even a music clip. I also try to make them as Interactice as possible stopping and telling a related story or applying the topics in terms of the students.
    3. Immensely as I give alot of information that cannot be found in thier textbooks or other readings I give them.
    4. Binders count as 10% (approximately of my kid's term grades). I grade them at the end of each unit and the notes are checked along with the other assignments.
    5. I usually take notes using the system that I suggest to my students. I review my notes a few hours after I have taken them (usually at home.)
     
  4. MadTownTeacher

    MadTownTeacher New Member

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    Jul 17, 2007

    I do notes differently depending on what information I want the kids to know. For example, for vocabulary words, the kids must copy my notes exactly from the board regarding pronunciation, part of speech, and definition. But then, I call on students for synonyms, connections, "sounds like", and pictures that relate. And they can choose which of these items best helps them learn the new word. (i.e., ferocious: fer-O-shuss; adj.; fierce, intimidating, threatening. The dog was ferocious when he bared his teeth. [picture of an angry dog]) By the way, one of the other things that really helps my kids is when I try to get them to give me similar words in Spanish. (Most of my students are Spanish speakers.)

    Other notes may be presented on PowerPoint as a cloze activity. I give the kids shrunken versions of the screen shots and they fill in the blanks on key concepts or write in bulleted items. We discuss the ideas as we go and I find many students add their own notes and concepts out to the sides when a friend says something they want to remember.

    Another method that seems to work is to have the kids read silently and take their own notes, then when everyone is done, they can compare their notes with their friends, Different kids have different styles of notetaking and have highlighted various areas to know, so the students can check their comprehension--kind of like pair/share. (I always collect these notes and check them myself, though, because sometimes inaccurate info gets passed around!)
     
  5. inlovewithwords

    inlovewithwords Companion

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    Jul 17, 2007

    Cornell-notes

    I feel that Cornell Notes are excellent because they show students a purpose for taking notes. This style makes note-taking useful and I have found that students ask some really great questions on the left side. I actually used an entire lesson to teach how to effectively take notes using Cornell Notes.
    I explained to the students that "I am not telling you how to take notes or trying to change the way you like to do it. In the notes column you may continue to take notes any way that you like (outline, abbreviate...etc.)."
    I also bring in some examples of my own college notes and pass them around the room. Students LOVE looking at what college notes might look like and it informs them that note-taking will be expected of them throughout their lives.
    You may also want to do a lesson on questioning. How to ask good questions.
    Also, anytime I write something on the board, I feel the students should be writing so that they are accountable for the information no matter what.
     
  6. childcare teach

    childcare teach Comrade

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    Jul 17, 2007

    SOME TEAHCER I KNOW JUST COPY WHAT THEY WANT TO STUDENT TO HAVE SO THE SPELLING IS RIGHT AND OTHER THINGS.
     
  7. katrinkit

    katrinkit Comrade

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    Jul 17, 2007

    I teach 7th and 8th grade history. In my area, a lot of the high school teachers require students to outline, so in 7th grade I will teach basic notetaking and then in 8th grade I will teach outlining. Hopefully, students will feel a bit more prepared when they get to high school and are asked to outline.

    I always offer my notes on the overhead, but as the year goes on, I write less and less. When they seem to have it down, I have students take their own notes before I show them mine. This takes a bit more time, but seems to work well. By the end of the year, I stop giving my notes on the overhead.

    I also have a small book for each chapter of my history texts that has notes, activities and quizzes. I sometimes give these notes instead of having students write everything - it gives them a break.
     
  8. ayotte04

    ayotte04 Comrade

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    Jul 17, 2007

    I wont be specific in my answers, but I HATE...again HATE Cornell notes. It never worked for me as a student. Overall I let kids do what works for them. They're the ones studying from those notes, not me.

    Check out all those threads about Interactive Notebooks in the General Educ. section. It's an idea I'm new to and interested in.
     
  9. lupin43

    lupin43 Companion

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    Jul 17, 2007

    Last year I gave a lot of math notes. This year I am going to give step by step notes as well as having students create their own notes. I have them journal for bellwork. Write notes during lesson and once a unit create a concise note sheet for a reference section of notes. This provides them many ways to look at the same material. Often, they write exactly as I do, but I use a lot of diagrams.
     

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