Take Home Reading Program

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by SaraFirst, Oct 3, 2007.

  1. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    566
    Likes Received:
    3

    Oct 3, 2007

    I do a "reading baggy" each night (Mon-Thurs). Mon and Tues each student has the same decodable reader from our reading series. Wed and Thurs students have other books, such as leveled readers from our old series or books they have read in guided reading group. I am wondering how other first grade teachers structure their take home reading program. Do you (or a volunteer) listen to each child read the books they take home? Do they take them home for one night or more? One year, I gave them a book to read the whole week to practice fluency, but I don't think all parents understood the purpose of rereading. This way works better for now, b/c the students know to return the book each day.
     
  2.  
  3. firstgradeteach

    firstgradeteach Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 3, 2007

    I have spent a LOT of money buying books off of E-bay, garage sales and printing off leveled books off of Reading A-Z. I have them organized in baskets by level. I have probably at least 30 books per level.

    If they do not read with me in reading group that day... they choose a "Just Right Book" from their just right baskets to take home. We have talked about if they know all of the words without sounding out.... it is too easy.... if they flip through on a quick word walk and they don't know a lot of words... then it is too hard. Just right is when they know most words but a few they might have to sound out. My students take home a new book each night.

    www.readinga-z.com is my favorite teaching website. If you are not familiar with it there are hundreds of leveled books you can print off.... these could be more choices to start just right baskets... if you are interested!

    When students read with me in reading group they take the book home and read it again. They bring it back and put it in their book browsing boxes. (These are books that they have read at least 2-3 times. I have students buddy read to practice fluently reading the books in their book browsing tubs.)

    I have 10... yes 10... classroom volunteers this year. Maybe I will have my lower students take home the just right book that they read with the volunteer. Thanks for the idea!!!!! It just makes too much sense!:lol:
     
  4. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    566
    Likes Received:
    3

    Oct 3, 2007

    Wow! 10 volunteers! I wouldn't know what to do with them all. Thanks for the reminder about readinga-z. Our prinicpal said she might order a subscription for us this year and I forgot about it until I read your post. I will have to check into that.
     
  5. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Messages:
    2,518
    Likes Received:
    9

    Oct 3, 2007

    I had three wonderful people come in and get my nightly reading program in order for me my second year teaching. They collected tons of books, leveled them according to a RR list, and put them in bins.

    I do a quick assessment of each child the first or second week of school. I have them read the leveled books to me until the book becomes difficult. Then I back them up and that is their nightly reading level.

    Each night M-Th, they take home a book at their level in a ziplock bag and read to an adult. The adult signs the reading log and gives comments. The kids are responsible for getting the book back to school each day. They put them in a bin, and during the day I trade out the books for a new book that night. Last year I discovered that this tedious job could be done by the kids themselves once they were at a certain reading level. One of their morning jobs was to turn in their old book and choose a new book at their level, bag it, and get it into the backpack.

    This system has been great. Everyone gets to read every night at their own level. Kids earn a sticker for every 5 books they read, and it is not long till they are begging for extra books. I had a child last year who begged for 10 books a night, and I finally gave in to him! At the end of the year his reading log listed about 450 books he had read! (counting books read in class)

    This is a real corner stone of my program and it is so neat to see the kids advancing. I print out Rebus books and collect books with only color or number words for my very very timid beginners, so everyone has a "book" to take home and they are all thrilled. It's fun. My one rule is that they can't have a new book until they bring the book bag back, and they have to pay 5.00 for any lost book.
     
  6. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Messages:
    2,699
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 3, 2007

    I don't have a take home reading program but I would LOVE to have one. I have a lot of leveled books. I'm just really scared that they will not come back to school.
     
  7. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Messages:
    2,518
    Likes Received:
    9

    Oct 3, 2007

    Miss Kirby, I had the same worry. I started the system with used books so it wasn't anything out of my pocket or detracting from the classroom if they got lost. I don't know what kind of families you have - are they involved with their kids' learning? Those who are will be pretty consciencious to get the books back. I send home about 3 letters describing the nightly reading program and what is expected and that there is a charge for lost books.

    I keep a very tight reign on the books. While the kids do their a.m. seat work, I take attendance then go right to the book bin, put the bags in number order (every kid has a number), and if all the books aren't in the bin, I call out the names of the ones there and have the kids stand up. Kids still seated know they didn't turn in their book bags, and usually get right up and go get them. If they forgot the books at home, no new books. If the books don't come back the next day, a letter goes home and the student has to give me recess time. I figure everyone forgets now and then, but if they don't get the books back, they don't earn stickers like their friends do, and that usually gets them motivated. In 6 years I have only had 2 books permanently lost. But you do have to keep a sharp eye out. Another thought would be to use books you can print out from teacher sites that wouldn't cost.
     
  8. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Messages:
    2,518
    Likes Received:
    9

    Oct 3, 2007

    Oh, one more thing. We do role playing in the classroom for a while. We go through each step: you get the book bag from the teacher, the book bag goes right in your backpack, your backpack gets zipped up. The backpack goes home. You take out the book bag, read to mom or dad, they sign the log, zip the book and log into the book bag, you put it in your backpack, you put your backpack by the door for the morning. We do this several times and it is fun for the kids because I act like a total idiot - a gushing parent, "Oh my darling daughter, what beautiful reading! Oh you are so brilliant!"

    (I am here at school late, supposed to be working, getting brain fried - can you tell?)
     
  9. new2FL

    new2FL Companion

    Joined:
    May 4, 2007
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 13, 2007

    Both Houghton Mifflin and Open Court have disposable "take home" books as part of their reading series. I send these home nightly. The kids read to the parent, if they read it fluently, the parent initials and returns the book. When it comes back, the child reads to me, I sign the book, put a sticker on the book and one on their sticker chart, then they get to keep the "book". It works very well for me.

    The only downfall is finding the time to listen to all the readers as they return books. I do it during morning work and D.E.A.R. time.
     
  10. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    Messages:
    3,565
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 13, 2007

    My daughters' school does the 100 Book Challenge and the Red Book Bag program.

    100 Book Challenge is organized by independent reading level. My kindergarten daughters are still learning to read, so they bring home two books each night that have one word and one picture per page. We do a picture walk, then read the book to them, then they read the book to us. Then they read it to the cats, each other, their stuffed animals, and so on - for fun. They bring home two books per night until they reach 100 books. I heard that last year many kids went way beyond 100 and really loved it. All but one made it to 100 last year.

    The Red Book Bag program is weekly, and they bring home a book with a journal in a red book bag. We do the book walk, and then read the book to them. These are books above their independent reading level (because they can't really read yet) but older kids just read to themselves, or to a sibling, or whatever they like. Then, the kid has to draw a picture and write about one part of the story they enjoyed. The journal travels with the book so they can see what others drew and wrote.

    I think these are organized programs that can be purchased by schools. In other words, I don't think my girls' school came up with these programs on their own.
     
  11. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,304
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 14, 2007

    I do the take home reading program and have only lost one book in all my years of teaching. I have a contract that the parents and the students sign before the program begins. They have to pay $5 if a book is lost or damaged. I keep those contracts on file and have had to get them out once for a child who insisted that she turned in the book. (same kid who was on a 504 plan the first month of school because she threw things, hit kids, talked back, ran out of the room, into the parking lot on several occasions,etc.). Anyway, I make the kids call home if the book is missing or has been for awhile. The only book I lost was from one kid who ate the corners. Don't ask. Ick!!
     
  12. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    566
    Likes Received:
    3

    Oct 14, 2007

    Thanks for all the ideas! My students have been doing a pretty good job of returning their books this year. Our principal agreed to purchase a readingatoz subscription, so I'm just waiting for the $ to go through so that I can start printing out the books!
     
  13. Pattie

    Pattie Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 14, 2007

    I do the same book baggie every night that you are talking about. I have done it many ways but have decided the best way is to let the kids pick books from the series that I have in my room (Arthur, Franklin, Clifford, Curious George, Magic Treehouse, Junie B. Jones etc.) I also have about a dozen book bins of magazines, picture books, non fiction, etc. Kids read for one night and bring back or if it is a chapter book they take a week or so. I keep track of their books with a little booklet 4 pages of lined paper w/dates called their "Reading Log". It has a page in the back that lists number 1 to 170 for them to cross off as they finish a book. It is very motivating. They take "Book Adventures" reading tests on some of these books too. I give out occasional perks and treats to keep motivation up. I also have 18 home reading backpacks they can check out throughout the year with 4-5 books plus 2 activities on a theme (Skeleton backpack has 3 books, a paper skeleton to cut out and paste on black paper, and a mini jelly skeleton to keep plus some bone match up fun pages. It seems to be the favorite. I found my kids didn't like the black and white copy page booklets. They weren't appealing enough to keep their interest all year. Downside of letting them take my books home is that I always lose 4 or 5 each year. It's a small price to pay to get kids to read. Most parents will replace them anyway, not all but most. :unsure:
     
  14. Pattie

    Pattie Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 14, 2007

    Teachingmomof4 how do you keep track of each kids' individual book? Do you have a chart or what? That's what always trips me up. I think I will try the numbered baggies. I know I've lost lots of books but I didn't want to spend a lot of time being policeman.
     
  15. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,304
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 14, 2007

    I have a form that I made that shows it. If you PM me, I can send it to you as an attachment to your email. I just put them in a notebook, alphabetized by first name and can easily record who has what book. When they bring it back, I cross it out. It also has the date so I know how long the book has been gone.
     
  16. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    566
    Likes Received:
    3

    Oct 15, 2007

    I like the idea of the reading backpacks. I haven't tried them before. Do/did you figure out the activities and buy the books yourself or get a grant or school funds? Do the kids use and enjoy them? How often do they take them home and are they required or optional?
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Isaiah Pritzl
Total: 362 (members: 3, guests: 327, robots: 32)
test