Syllable Posters???

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Darkhorse, Aug 2, 2008.

  1. Darkhorse

    Darkhorse Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 2, 2008

    I am not sure if something like this has been posted before, but I was wondering if anyone had seen posters or signs for teaching syllable rules. I want to make a display with pictures for syllables this year to help the kids remember them. I saw something like this in a classroom when I was in college, but I don't remember what the pictures were that went along with each rule. Or if anyone has ideas for pictures that could go with each rule so I could make my own. Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
     
  2.  
  3. Darkhorse

    Darkhorse Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 4, 2008

    Anyone....?
     
  4. MissHunny

    MissHunny Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2007
    Messages:
    340
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 4, 2008

    I used Explode the Code for the past two years, a phonics program that had the splittling into syllable rules. There were no posters to go with it, and it was extremely hard for the kids to understand. We may not be doing the program this year. I would keep reminders on the board like vc/cv.
    Maybe you could make posters with the rules like that and also give real word examples.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,950
    Likes Received:
    2,102

    Aug 4, 2008

    I found the following rules for you. You can make your own posters- one for each rule? and either use word art to show the division of syllables or look for graphics on google images.

    Dividing Words Into Syllables
    There are four ways to split up a word into its syllables:

    1. Divide between two middle consonants.
    Split up words that have two middle consonants. For example:

    hap/pen, bas/ket, let/ter, sup/per, din/ner, and Den/nis. The only exceptions are the consonant digraphs. Never split up consonant digraphs as they really represent only one sound. The exceptions are "th", "sh", "ph", "th", "ch", and "wh".

    2. Usually divide before a single middle consonant.
    When there is only one syllable, you usually divide in front of it, as in:

    "o/pen", "i/tem", "e/vil", and "re/port". The only exceptions are those times when the first syllable has an obvious short sound, as in "cab/in".

    3. Divide before the consonant before an "-le" syllable.
    When you have a word that has the old-style spelling in which the "-le" sounds like "-el", divide before the consonant before the "-le". For example: "a/ble", "fum/ble", "rub/ble" "mum/ble" and "thi/stle". The only exception to this are "ckle" words like "tick/le".

    4. Divide off any compound words, prefixes, suffixes and roots which have vowel sounds.
    Split off the parts of compound words like "sports/car" and "house/boat". Divide off prefixes such at "un/happy", "pre/paid", or "re/write". Also divide off suffixes as in the words "farm/er", "teach/er", "hope/less" and "care/ful". In the word "stop/ping", the suffix is actually "-ping" because this word follows the rule that when you add "-ing" to a word with one syllable, you double the last consonant and add the "-ing".
     
  6. Darkhorse

    Darkhorse Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 4, 2008

    Hmmm.... Well I guess I will just have to come up with something on my own. MissHunny, my students have a hard time with the syllable rules also, which is why I wanted some kind of visual reminder.:cool:

    Thanks, Czacza for the rules. I have a couple more that I will add to those and come up with some kind of poster to go with them.

    Thanks anyway!:hugs:
     
  7. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,071
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 5, 2008

    I made a poster for the 6 syllable types. It was a big clover and on each leaf it had a different syllable type.
    C= Closed Syllable ( vowel surrounded by consonants-short vowel)
    L= -le (final stable syllable, I think can also include -tion,-cion)
    O= Open Syllable (no consonant after vowel, vowel is left open so it is long)
    V= Vowel Team (long vowels)
    E= vowel consonant e (vowel is long)
    R= R controlled vowel

    Google "6 syllable types" and you will get a more detailed description and activities.
     
  8. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Messages:
    3,544
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 5, 2008

    Whoa-are we suppose to be teaching this? I've never heard of this stuff, and it sounds way complicated. Where would this fit in? Eeeek!
     
  9. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,071
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 5, 2008

    Teaching the syllable types is great for giving kids a tool for reading multisyllabic words. It just teaches them to look for letter patterns and sounds for reading and spelling. You would teach this during work knowledge, blending, spelling, etc...
     
  10. DaTeach

    DaTeach Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Messages:
    313
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 5, 2008

    It is an objective in our MS framework. We have never had to teach it in 4th grade until last year. It was an objective taught in k-3. Now I'm having to build a file for this also. There is nothing in any textbook/file collection that I have in my classroom. I have had to get information from other teachers and the internet!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Backroads,
  2. bella84
Total: 374 (members: 3, guests: 347, robots: 24)
test