Surge in High Quality Graduates Becoming Teachers

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Tyler B., Nov 7, 2013.

  1. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    It turns out that more and more top students are getting into teaching. In a recently released study, researchers Dan Goldhaber and Joe Walch report that, graduates both with and without STEM majors who entered the teacher workforce had higher average SAT scores than their peers who entered other occupations.


    Those of us who've watching some amazing new teachers breaking in already knew this.

    http://educationnext.org/gains-in-teacher-quality/
     
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  3. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    The question is, do they/will they stay???

    In addition to those 50% who leave the profession within the first 5 years, I think there are many teachers ready to bail when the economy improves and other opportunities present themselves.

    http://www.takepart.com/article/201...s-poor-retention-rates-irreplaceable-teachers
     
  4. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    They're the same as any other teacher. If they find a passion for the position and a good match in administration, they'll probably stay.
     
  5. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    The study also produced these findings:

    • Teacher applicants and new teachers in recent years have significantly higher SAT scores than their counterparts in the mid-1990s.

    • Graduates entering the teaching profession in the 2008-09 school year had average SAT scores that slightly exceeded average scores of their peers entering other occupations.

    • The share of prospective teachers earning their degrees in education from a graduate program rather than an undergraduate one has risen sharply over time, from about 45 percent in 1990 to about 63 percent in 2010.

    • Students who majored in science, math or engineering and then became teachers in 2008 or 2009 had higher SAT scores than science, math and engineering majors who entered other occupations.
     
  6. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

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    Just to clarify, are you for or against high-stakes testing?
     
  7. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Agreed. We're talking about high quality candidates entering teaching. Testing has nothing to do with this current topic.
     
  8. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Agreed.
     
  9. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I'll be honest. This used to frustrate me. I know many teachers who graduated with a business degree or something of that nature and then immediately started an education graduate program. Then I realized my teacher prep program did nothing except shove the state lesson plan format down our throats...no methods and other important related topics.
     
  10. Jeky

    Jeky Comrade

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    Since when does having high SAT scores mean that someone will be a good teacher??? :dizzy:
     
  11. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    SAT scores are only indicative of so much, that is true. I'd love to get future teachers to take Angela Duckworth's Grit Test. It's one of the best measurements I've ever seen for predicting if someone has the ability to stick with a goal long-term.
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    SATs are no more intended to show who will be a good teacher than they are to show who will be a good cancer researcher or a good legislator. With that said, higher scores do generally correlate with the possession of a certain set of academic skills and with the self-possession to be able to use them under pressure. If it requires the looming prospect of the test to pound into certain resistant crania the home truth that the much-taught skills really are worth having and cultivating, that's inelegant - one wishes for the case to have been made or accepted much earlier - but in my view the test justifies its existence right there. Then again, I've never taken (or taught) a test I haven't learned from.
     
  13. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I'm in somewhat of a unique situation... I graduated with a BA in music, but most of my undergrad career was as a music ed major. When my adviser sat me down and had an intervention... basically telling me that my piano and conducting skills would never, ever, ever let me teach music... I switched to a BA program with the intention of making it big as an actor on Broadway. When it finally occurred to me that I couldn't even get cast in roles in Rochester, NY, I went back for my master's degree, in an initial program.

    Long story short, the grad school education classes I took were far better and far more practical than the ones I took as an undergrad. I was a much better teacher with my grad school classes than I would have been with my undergrad classes.
     
  14. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    I posted this because I feel proud of my profession and happy that, despite all the attacks from politicians, it appears to be growing stronger with tons of high-quality students becoming motivated to go into education.
     
  15. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

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    You...can't be serious. How, exactly, did they differentiate high-quality candidates from average candidates?

    With high-stakes testing and data analysis.
     
  16. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Are SAT tests considered "high-stakes" testing? What are the stakes? I think they are more like college-entrance exams.

    I am one who did not do particularly well on my SAT's (I was diagnosed with walking pneumonia 3 days prior to taking them) but I think I've been a successful teacher.

    I also do think it's good news, especially since you hear about schools having to go with maybe 2nd-choice candidates to fill those STEM positions.
     
  17. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

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    Everyone does.

    The stakes are high because they ARE college-entrance exams, and in many states the formula that determines school rankings and funding is directly tied to performance on college entrance exams.
     
  18. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I'm glad to see SAT scores being used instead of college GPAs. I've found that grades in education departments are grossly inflated.
     
  19. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

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    Agreed. One of the reasons we need rigorous standardized tests is the fact that grade inflation is not only a problem in education departments; that inflation is modeling for educators to take into the classroom. I have a student with an IQ of 65 who reads at a 2nd grade level. She's been passed along because she's "so sweet and polite," despite the fact that it's doing her harm.

    Now that I'm teaching her in a grade where she must past the standardized test to get a diploma, I'm the bad guy to mom. "She keeps passing her other classes; what do you mean she's not passing your class?!" If I just give her the grade and she fails the test by 150 points (passing is 360), how does that reflect upon our school?

    Of course, the short-sightedness of my peers and their grade inflation has put me in this position.
     
  20. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    That's great news Tyler - thanks for posting.
     
  21. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Nov 12, 2013

    I can not think of a better example of high stakes testing than the SATs.
     
  22. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Should this girl with an IQ of 65 be held back every year until she masters the content? Surely repeating her over and over is simply not worthwhile... What would you suggest?
     
  23. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

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    A frank, honest discussion of her abilities and limitations should have been had years ago between the SPED teachers, content are teachers, administration, and parents. Inclusion for this girl is certainly beneficial, but it's not beneficial when the expectation is that she master the content, pass the class, and get a high school diploma.

    Inclusion in general ed classes is certainly a good idea if it's the least restrictive environment; I genuinely enjoy having the girl in class and think she benefits from the social aspect of class. Other students enjoy having her in class as well because she's genuinely sweet and polite. However, when I get multiple calls/e-mails a day about this student's grades from her mother because this is the first time she's failed an English class (despite her reading level being so low), it's impeding my ability to prepare for class. When this girl is frequently frustrated and struggles to hold back tears because she's been told all along that she's mastered the content (when she hasn't) and now can't master this content, it's negating any benefit she receives from the other aspects of being included in the class environment.

    Frankly, she needs the life skills that would be provided in a moderate-disability classroom. She should still go to inclusion classes for the social aspect of class, but the reason she's going needs to be clearly articulate to mom, who is putting so much pressure on this poor girl.
     

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