Supply Protocol

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by miss_ali1984, Jun 26, 2011.

  1. miss_ali1984

    miss_ali1984 Companion

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    Jun 26, 2011

    Last year was my first year teaching 1st grade. One of the biggest problems we had in our classroom supplies-wise was with supplies.

    For my children, they each got a plastic pencil box. They each had crayons, scissors, and up to 2 pencils (UNLESS they were special pencils from home, etc). When both of their pencils had broken, the child was to put the pencil in the unsharpened basket and take one from the sharpened basket. I did not allow my children to sharpen pencils, partly because I was concerned about them abusing/breaking the sharpener that I had, knowing that my school would not provide me/us with new.

    Here were the major problems that arose from the pencil box system regarding supplies and especially pencils:

    -Pencils came back with erasers and metal eraser holders torn off or tampered with/paint shaved off/etc, or simply broken in half.

    -Children did not put supplies back into pencil boxes despite constant reminders, often resulting in a desk full of pencils along with other supplies.

    -Children broke and threw crayons, played with glue and scissors, and drew all over the pencil boxes despite constant reminders/consequences.

    I tried moving to a system of a supply area at the back of the room in the case of glue and scissors at the end of the year because so many children were playing with them, but in the end the children would use the supplies, hide them in their desk, and be caught playing with them again. Do you have any advice for me? Would table baskets work better? I am especially interested to hear your thoughts on the pencil situation because that was a disaster!! :blush:
     
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  3. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Jun 26, 2011

    At the beginning of the year, I collected all their pencils, and wrote their student number in sharpie marker on each one. Then, the extras went in ziploc bags in a cabinet. When their pencil was dull, they put it in the dull cup. If both their pencils break, they can take an extra one from the cup of sharp ones. At lunch and after school I sharpened all the pencils in the dull cup and returned them to the students. I found that this worked very well, as they were using "THEIR" pencil most of the time.
     
  4. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Jun 26, 2011

    I've have desk fairies. Reward those with great looking desks and others often fall in line.

    You can also turn kids' desk around with opening in front - away from little hands.

    Again its all about expectations and teach teach teaching them in the beginning. If you mess up - you are done! Child keeps breaking pencil lead - take it away. Now you have to use crayon. Child plays with glue or scissors - hmmm how un-fun, you don't get to use.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 26, 2011

    I agree with skittles. Consequences, consequences. Model your expectations. At clean up time after an activity, do a quick check of desk tops and supply boxes. Desk fairy is a great idea.
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    If you do table baskets, have the children check that everything is in them, then you check. Keep the baskets away from the tables for when they are not in use.
     
  7. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Jun 26, 2011

    This is what I would do, and have done in my student teaching. I had one student take this "white glue" (elmer's glue) and just pour it out onto his desk, his hands, and then smear it all over the table. Oh boy was he in trouble. Started off by taking it away from him, which elicited the whines of "how am I supposed to glue this paper together!" which was responded with "You should've thought of that before covering your table in glue." He had other punishments, of course for messing up his desk. Poor janitor had to scrape for a half hour to get the glue residue off the desk.

    I also have done this with crayons because we had one boy who thought his crayons were rocket ships. They were taken away often.
     
  8. Toast

    Toast Companion

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    Jun 26, 2011

    Keep supplies in a pencil box away from the desks. When the boxes are finished being used have 1 kid from each table/team inventory the boxes.

    Reward those who have everything neatly put back in.....stickers, stamps, even a large bag of m&m's can go a long way.

    Also, as far as keeping writing and coloring off of the pencil boxes...... number your boxes so each student has the same box every time. Have a contest....those with the neatest and nicest looking pencil box by the end of the school year wins a prize.

    I usually hold that contest with name tags....... I usually judge right before our state testing. Anyone who has a nametag still in tact ends of getting a homework pass from me.
     
  9. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

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    Jun 26, 2011

    I agree you need to model. I also had students turn in dull pencils and we used community glue. My students knew that it their scissors broke from playing with them or if they kept glue that they would not get anymore.

    Simple as that. Worked well for me.
     
  10. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

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    Oh I also had the desk fairy. She would come and make sure desks were nice and tidy.
     
  11. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Jun 26, 2011

    Agreed!

    My students sit in groups of 4. Each group has a team leader (team leaders rotate throughout the year so everyone can have a turn). The team leader is in charge of making sure that their teammates' desks look like "model 2nd graders' desks." The teams that have the cleanest desks earn a point for their group at the end of the day (more than one team can earn a point). On Friday, the team(s) with the most points earn a reward. (Side Note: Students earn team points for other reason such as being prepared to learn, being on task throughout a lesson, coming in the classroom quietly, etc.)

    The first few weeks of 1st and 2nd grade should be spent SHOWING the kids how their desks should look. Explaining how their desks should look isn't good enough--period! These little ones need to see exactly how things should be organized.

    P.S. I don't call them "pencil boxes"--I call them "tool boxes". The kids are accountable for taking care of their tools and they really learn responsibility this way.

    P.P.S. By spending lots of time modeling at the beginning of the year, you'll save yourself oodles of time in the long run! Trust me! :thumb:
     
  12. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

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    Jun 26, 2011

    I teach first grade, and I don't let the students keep scissors, glue, glue sticks,or markers in their desks. They are in common supply containers, and only put out when we are using them.
    Of course I go through all of the procedures, but also the consequences.

    My consequences:
    You threw your crayon? Then you don't have crayons to use today, write the color word in where you were supposed to use.

    You destroyed your pencil or threw it? Then you don't have a pencil today. You will have to use a crayon.

    You painted your fingernails with marker? You lose your markers and need to use crayon.

    Since they didn't have the messier materials in their desks, they weren't a problem.

    They hated these consequences, so once was all it took to teach them to never do it again.

    I ordered pencil cap erasers, because the pencils I ordered last year had a defect, and the erasers fell out the first time the children used them. If the children were going through them like water, I showed them how many erasers were in the box, and how many they had used. They were much more careful after that.
     
  13. miss_ali1984

    miss_ali1984 Companion

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    Jun 26, 2011

    All great ideas. I think that some extra modeling next year is going to go a long way. There are so many things to learn the first year and I doubt that I put enough emphasis on these talks about supplies last year. Awards for tidy supplies would be good too. Thanks to all!
     
  14. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Jun 26, 2011

    :hugs: every year we get better! The important part is to learn from it. Second year is always better than the first!
     
  15. AZMrs.S

    AZMrs.S Cohort

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    Jun 26, 2011

    These are really great ideas especially for me to consider as I approach my first year... I have one question.. Wouldn't some kids see it as a fun thing to get to write in crayon all day and therefore try to lose the right to use their pencil? How do you handle this so it isn't a fun thing?
     
  16. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Believe it or not, when they see their classmates writing with a pencil, they feel quite embarrassed and typically never have to write with a crayon again. They don't like being the only one using a crayon!!!
     
  17. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

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    I was thinking the same thing. My students would want to write in crayon.
     
  18. Mommyserenity

    Mommyserenity Devotee

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    I teach first grade too and my kids keep a small, pencil box in their desks with a few pencils, a box of crayons, markers, glue stick , and scissors. I have the same type of consequences if they misuse their supplies and if they break/tear up something then they just don't have it to use unless they can convince their parents to buy more for them to bring in to class. I had one student who wanted to do her work in crayon. I told her I was sorry that she knew we did not use crayons on work, unless it called for it, so sadly she would had to use her free time to re-do her work in pencil. She didn't do that again! We really didn't have too many issues with them having limited supplies in their desk and it gave me a chance to teach them about keeping up with their own things and being respectful of how they use their resources and to use them wisely.
     
  19. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Jun 27, 2011

    My students hate writing in crayon.

    At the beginning of the year, I let the students know that they must have five sharpened pencils each day to be prepared. If they are unprepared, they may raise their hand to ask for a crayon. They know not to ask for a pencil, because they know it is their responsibility to have one.

    This way I avoid all pencil drama. I have never seen a student write in crayon all day - somehow someone always comes to their rescue to lend them a pencil.
     
  20. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    oh no :( having to write with a crayon like a little kid??? The key to this working is how you handle it. If you yank the pencil and say you're being a baby so you have to write in crayon - the kid will hate you. If you say oh no those who choose to mistreat their pencil have to write with a crayon. The child is more likely to reflect on the behavior that caused it - that is what we want. Have a sad look on your face - not mean. Treat the child as normal. And then let it alone. Give the kid a chance the next day to use a big kid pencil - if it happens again, don't say anything but take the pencil. He will get the message. Just a little love n logic.


    BTW, this is why my students use pens - not pencils. I teach kinder and it works great. Now that being said - we do hardly any worksheets so they mostly use them for writer's workshop.
     
  21. Mommyserenity

    Mommyserenity Devotee

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    Ugh! Pencil drama....I dealt with that last year! My kids could spend half the day at the pencil sharpener. I made the rule that as part of preparing for class that they needed to sharpen three pencils and then had a chance to re-sharpen during lunch break/transition if needed before afternoon class resumed.
     
  22. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

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    Jun 27, 2011

    I just sharpen a bucket of pencils in the morning, and one of their jobs after breakfast is to change their pencil(put the dull pencil in the dull bucket). If it breaks, they just change it again. I also don't allow special pencils from home. Everybody uses the class supply. They are not allowed to use my sharpener(it's electric). I can check the pencils for destruction in the morning, and reteach pencil procedures and care at morning meeting before we get down to work for the day if it's necessary.
    No more pencil drama, and the motor on my pencil sharpener didn't burn out from overuse this year.


    And on the crayon thing, they hate writing with them, because they don't have the control that they do with a pencil. One day of writing with crayons is usually all it takes. I do the, "oh, that's sad, you destroyed your pencil, you'll need to use crayons today then", love and logic approach.
     
  23. miss_ali1984

    miss_ali1984 Companion

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    Jun 27, 2011

    One of the interesting things about last year, just to stoke the fire a bit, is that I had so many DIFFERENT KINDS of supplies given to me. There were "special" journals/pencils/crayons from some kids, and then the kids who qualified brought free school supply kits (AKA about 19 of my 22 kids). The free supply kits contained things COMPLETELY different than what was asked for on the supply lists. Most of them had sets of 8 junky crayons, 3 horrible pencils, a mini-bottle of glue, a ruler, a protractor, a mini-notebook, scissors that broke the first time most of them used them, a pop up book (WHAT?) and/or a copy of Treasure Island (a book that was appropriate for zero of my Level-B, first grade students). It was very hard divying out supplies that weren't there and having some students with 24 crayons, others with 8 that broke quickly. Mom and Dad obviously had no money to buy anything new, either. Luckily this year, since most of the supplies were donated to the students last year, I kept the ones that held up as a donation for our class this year. It will go a lot better if everyone actually DOES have the same.
     
  24. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jun 27, 2011

    That's why a lot of teachers I know charge the parents a few dollars and then buy all the supplies for the students. Not sure I want this undertaking, but I have many K-2 teachers who do.
     
  25. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

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    Jun 27, 2011

    I've done both community supplies and individual supplies and I now do a combination of both. I collect pencils and glue sticks for community supplies. I have a basket for dull and one for sharp pencils. At the end of the day, two students have a job of collecting, sharpening and redistributing the pencils.
    We talk a lot about not destroying the pencils because everyone has to use them and no one wants to use a chewed up one.
    If I don't buy into the "that pencil is better than this one" and "he got the taller pencil" the kids don't seem to be too obsessed with it either.
    Every other supply is kept in their desk. One problem I did have is that I had a bucket of left over markers and crayons. I noticed that a few kids would kind of "hoard" the markers and their little school boxes were overflowing with extra markers.
     
  26. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Jun 28, 2011

    oh, snap! :lol:
     
  27. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

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    Jun 28, 2011

    That consequence came about because I had so many kids that didn't have crayons at home, and so "couldn't do their homework". Um, yes, you can, write the word in, or the first letter.
    I've never actually had to take their crayons, but I have had to take their markers.
     

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