Summarizing

Discussion in 'General Education' started by OUOhYeah, Nov 25, 2015.

  1. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Nov 25, 2015

    I just taught my class how to Cite Textual Evidence. I'm sure I will have to review it come next week when they get back from break... I am wondering how you all teach summarizing? My students like to clump all of the supportive details together and tell me exactly what happens. Since I have taught them citing they are no quoting everything correctly, but they are sick of summarizing because it takes them a long time to write. I have told them that they need to give me an overview of what's going on. I also tell them they need to grab my attention to read whatever they are summarizing. Any ideas would be helpful.
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Nov 25, 2015

    I say to write the main ideas in their own words, but none of the details. I give plenty of practice with short passages and ask them to tell who, what, where, and when.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Nov 25, 2015

    I used to do an activity where I handed out piece of paper with 25 blank spaces or grid boxes. They had to summarize an article or story using exactly 25 words, no more and no less, one word per box. This activity was especially good for sending the messages that a longer summary isn't necessarily a better summary and that being concise in a summary is a good thing.
     
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  5. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Nov 25, 2015

    I do this as well. The key is getting them to see that less is more when it comes to summarizing.
     
  6. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Nov 25, 2015

    I like that idea. I think elementary teachers are largely to blame for the misconception. When students take a reading assessment like the DRA, they have to write a summary... but the summary has to include a lot more information than a real summary should in order to get full credit. With my district, to get a "4" on the primary DRA summary section, students have to give a summary that's almost as long as the book itself.
     
  7. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Nov 25, 2015

    I don't know what grade level you teach, but I teach my seniors how to write a rhetorical precis. It's exactly four sentences, each sentence contains a certain type of information, and it must be paraphrased. It's tough, but a good exercise.
     
  8. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Nov 25, 2015

    Make them tweet it.
     
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  9. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Nov 25, 2015

    I disagree(at least in California).

    While I think the misconception begins in elementary school, the blame belongs on the department of education. The standard has been to "summarize", yet the state is really expecting students to paraphrase. The department of education has created this misconception.
     
  10. Letsgo

    Letsgo Rookie

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    Nov 26, 2015

    I teach my students that a "summary" can vary in length, but should be significantly shorter than the original. I usually have them practice summarizing something in 100 words, then 50 words, then 20 words. I've also used various sized post it notes to do this activity.
     
  11. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Fair enough. Either way, the problem at the upper levels comes from children being given incorrect information on what a summary is at younger levels.
     
  12. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Nov 28, 2015

    I teach Upper Elementary school and I'm trying to do something different because my kids are trying to write a page for a summary. I like the 25 grid box idea, is there anyway you could send that to me? I also like the tweeting idea. Something sort, sweet, and to the point.
     
  13. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Dec 2, 2015

    ReadWriteThink has a lot of good stuff on all things related to reading comprehension. Maybe you can modify this worksheet to fit your needs.

    I've also done the Tweeting thing, as RGK suggested. You can even shorten it up to hashtags only, like having students write a hashtag or two for each paragraph or section. It's a good way to address main ideas and key words, and it helps train kids to sort through the fluff in order to find the most important thing in a passage.
     

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  14. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

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    Dec 2, 2015

    Thank you! I love this GIST worksheet. I think the twitter feed will be a good thing.
     

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