Suggestions for parents

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by TulipsGirl, Jun 22, 2008.

  1. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Jun 22, 2008

    What kind of suggestions would you give to parents who really want to read with their kids over the summer to improve skills, but don't know where to start?

    This child should be reading at least 10 minutes every day (his fluency is weak, and phonics skills are slowing him down), but this well-meaning parent would like to know "what should I be DOING during this time to help him?" She wants to make sure that this reading time is productive. It's an excellent question, and I was wondering if you can help me put it into words.

    Here are my thoughts so far:
    *It's okay for her to be reading books over again to build fluency
    *encourage reading with expression (any suggestions on this?)
    *It's okay to skip a word he doesn't know and go back to it
    *Look for chunks in a word that he knows

    I would really appreciate any other ideas you might have! Thank you!
     
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  3. little317

    little317 Groupie

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    Jun 22, 2008

    I have actually made little phamplets for my parents that actually explain some phonemic awareness and phonics skills and activities. By teaching those parents how we teach the kids is something that has really helped my parents who had no clue. Does this mom know what specific skills in phonics that he struggles in? By pin pointing those skills and showing her ways to reteach him would help keep these reading sessions effective.

    Echoe reading is a great tool too!
     
  4. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

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    Jun 22, 2008

    For reading with expression, find books that stress this, like "No, David", "Eek! There's a Mouse in the House," "Sshhhh, The Baby is Sleeping". I can't think of any others off the top of my head, but these would be fun to read.
     
  5. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Jun 23, 2008

    I had a kindergarten teacher suggest something to help with fluency last year:
    1) Read a page or two to the child
    2) Have the child read the same page or two with you
    3) Have the child read the same thing alone
    4) Have the child read the same thing as if he were angry, then sad, then excited, then scared, etc....

    It's a fun thing to do and the child doesn't realize you're allowing him/her to practice fluency skills!
     
  6. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Jun 23, 2008

    Almost forgot-

    Have the child read a couple pages as slowly as s/he can, then as quickly as s/he can, then as quietly as s/he can, then as loudly as s/he can!

    You can also cover up all but the first letter of a few words in the text and have the child use context clues to guess what the word might be.

    Before reading a new book, have the child make a prediction T chart- write "I Predict..." on the left side, and "I was right!" on the right side. Have the child look through the book without reading it and make predictions. During or after reading, have the child place a checkmark across from the predictions that were correct! Using picture clues before reading sometimes helps a child with unfamiliar words- they can get the first sound or two and 'guess' the word.
     
  7. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Jun 23, 2008

    I'm using "How to Teach your Child to read in 100 easy lessons". It's very accessible to parents and is geared towards getting kindergarteners and pre-kinders to read. It can be pretty self-paced and the lessons don't generally take very long.
     
  8. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Jun 23, 2008

    GREAT SUGGESTIONS! THANKS EVERYBODY!
     
  9. TeachnRox

    TeachnRox Companion

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    Jun 30, 2008

    Helping Your Child Learn to Read ~ LONG

    At open house, I feel I give out so many papers, so rather than be bombarded, I have 1 tip a week in my weekly newsletter. There are 17 in all. Hope this helps! Here they are:

    Hint#1: Young readers should be encouraged to look at the pictures to help them figure out unknown words. Don't cover the illustrations when having your child read. Pictures are there to assist the child by giving meaning to the story. If you see your child glancing at the picture to figure out an unknown word, praise him/her with the exact words, "I like the way you looked at the picture to figure out that word." More hints will follow in future bulletins.


    Hint#2 When your young reader stops at an unknown word, encourage him/her to start the sentence over. Oddly enough, getting another "running start" is often enough to figure out the word. If you see your child starting a sentence over to figure out an unknown word, praise him/her with the exact words, "I like the way you started that sentence over again."


    Hint#3 Should a child be allowed to use his/her finger to follow along when reading? The answer is "yes" and "no." In the very early reading stages a child may need to use a finger. Don't allow the child to send confusing signals to the brain by switching fingers or hands. Consistently encourage your child to use his/her pointing finger. Using a finger helps the child with "one-to-one correspondence," which refers to knowing where one word starts and another begins. Using a finger helps to stimulate the "motor" side of the brain in learning to read. When one-to-one correspondence is in place, the child should not use a finger to follow along. More on using fingers in your hint next week.

    Hint# 4 When your child is stumped by an unknown word, encourage your child to put his/her finger under the first letter of the word and say the sound that goes with the word. Sometimes that alone is enough to figure out the word. Even if the child does not figure out the word, praise your child with the exact words, "I like the way you put your finger under the word and tried to say the sound that goes with that letter."

    Hint#5 Often when a child comes to an unknown word, the child will stop and wait for the adult to give them the word. In teacher lingo, that is called an "appeal." Don't ever give a child a word, until they have tried all three strategies already explained in earlier bulletins: looking at the picture, starting the sentence over again, putting his or her pointing finger under the first letter and saying the sound.

    Hint#6 When a child has trouble figuring out a word like "jump" or "swim," have the child act it out. This is always fun for young children to do. Once again, the "motor" side of the brain is being stimulated in the learning to read process. Also, the "affective" or emotional side of the brain is being stimulated in the learning process. Research demonstrates that when we are having fun, we learn better.

    Hint#7 When a child is having trouble with a word, help them by clapping out the sounds of the words (syllables may be too abstract a word to use with young readers). This is useful when a child mixes up "mother" and "mom" or "hippo" and "hippopotamus." Once again, the child is activating the "motor" side of the brain in the reading process. Learning to read just as often requires activation of the "motor" as well as "visual" and "hearing" sides of the brain.

    Hint#8 As the child progresses in learning to read, the child should be encouraged to look for known parts of unknown words. Encourage the child to look for a smaller word within the larger word. For instance, in the word "stand" the child may already know the word "and." In the word "seem" the child may already know the word "see." Use these words with your child, "Do you see any part of that word that you already know?"

    Hint#9 When coming to an unknown word, most of us grew up with the phrase, "sound out the word." Unfortunately, frustration occurs when a child comes to words like "light," "thought," or "cough." All too often the "sounding out" strategy simply doesn't work. That's why we encourage our young readers to learn the many strategies already explained in earlier bulletins to figure out unknown words. If one strategy doesn't work, we want the reader to try another strategy.

    Hint#10 The font that publishers use to print letters can be confusing to students. Notice the differences in the way these words are printed: gate, gate; I’ll, I’ll. A publisher’s “a,” “g,” and “I “ do not look like the “a,” “g,” and “I” that students learn to print. Teachers refer to this understanding as Concepts in Print. You can help your beginning readers at home by pointing out that some letters are made in different ways.

    Hint#11 Another confusing aspect of Concepts in Print is punctuation. As parents we often quiz our beginning readers in identifying the letters of the alphabet. We neglect the other marks on the page, such as commas, question marks, exclamation marks, and periods. Quotation marks are frequently used in children’s stories. A nickname that you can use for quotation marks is “talking marks.” From time to time, ask your young readers what the punctuation marks are telling the reader to do.

    Hint#12 Two other important aspects of Concepts in Print are called left-to-right progression and return sweep. As adults we take it for granted that we start at the left of the page and read to the right. We aren’t born with this knowledge. In fact, in this part of the word children may start from the right and go left when learning to read their first language. Bilingual students may have particular trouble with this concept. We want our beginning readers to know we read from left to right, drop down a line and then read from left to right again. While reading to your children, you may want to sometimes move your finger underneath these words to help establish this concept.

    Hint #13 More about Concepts in Print: Does your beginner reader know the difference between a letter and a word? Can your reader identify the first letter of a word? Can your reader identify the last letter of a word? Can your reader find a capital letter in a group of lower case letters? Again, these concepts may seem simple, but if a child does not have them “in place,” learning to read will be a difficult process.

    Hint#14 Many words do not have a regular sound-symbol relationship. Words such as “the,” “of,” “,” “you,” teachers call sight words. They are most effectively recognized as a total unit. Good readers must have a large stock of instant words. Children may need 120-140 exposures to a word before it becomes a part of his/her sight word bank. With a beginning reader you may want to ask the child to look at a page and point to the word “and.” Go to another page with “and” on it and ask them to point it again. This will help the word to become a part of the child’s “known” vocabulary.

    Hint#15 These are the first 25 sight words that teacher want a child to acquire in his/her known reading and writing vocabulary: I, a is, in am, to come, like, see, the my, we, and at, here, on up, look, go, this, it, me.

    Hint#16 Book Introduction Here’s something to try the next time your young reader receives a new book. Of course, read the title of the book and identify the author and illustrator. Give a short summary of the story. Point out that the second page is usually a title page with the same information as the front cover. Look at the other pages and talk about the pictures. THEN read the story. This will help set the stage for your child to learn to read independently.

    Hint#17 Here are some general prompts you can use to encourage your child to self-monitor their reading.
    • Something wasn’t quite right.
    • I like the way you worked that out.
    • You almost got that right. See if you can find what is wrong.
    • Where’s the tricky word?
    • What did you do to figure that out?
    • You’re nearly right, try that again.
    • Can you read that quickly?
    • Put your words together so that it sounds like talking.
    • How did you know what that word was/

    :)
     
  10. little317

    little317 Groupie

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    Jun 30, 2008

    Those are awesome suggestions! I would love to use those in my newsletters.
     
  11. Eliza

    Eliza Companion

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    Jun 30, 2008

    :2up:Love the hints, TeachnRox!
    Thanks for posting!
     
  12. Carebear05

    Carebear05 Comrade

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    Jul 6, 2008

    Make sure you let the parents know that not only is fluency important to work on, but also comprehension. Tell the parents to make the child give a prediction. They need to know what the purpose of reading is. Have the parent do echo reading with them and also buddy reading where the parent reads one page, the child reads the next and so on. Also, have the parents practice sight words with the child. Sight words are a HUGE part of reading.
     

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