Substitute Teaching Interview

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Kat., Jul 6, 2016.

  1. Kat.

    Kat. Companion

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    Jul 6, 2016

    Hi ya'll!

    I have an interview to be a sub in my local school district on July 12. I was hoping someone could give me some advice on how to ace it.

    I'm currently in an online alternative teaching program, and I won't be doing any student teaching - so I really need this for experience. I mean I'm technically qualified for the position, just hoping I do well enough at the interview to get it. :)

    I also was wondering if any of you have subbed while working part time elsewhere? I ask because I want as many resume boosters as possible and would like to find a part time job doing something such as working at a daycare or something along those lines. (Plus more money, haha.) Have any of ya'll done this?

    One more thing (sorry about all the questions, I'm nervous!) What was subbing like for you? What I mean is, did you wake up every morning wondering if you'd have work that day? Or were you able to see a schedule and pick dates? I've had people tell me both, and that would definitely make a difference on whether or not I got a second job. Subbing will be my priority as I feel as though that's my best opportunity for teaching experience.

    Any advice is very much appreciated!
     
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  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jul 6, 2016

    I wouldn't worry too much about the interview. Most school districts don't even have interview, they just have you go on orientation and submit all papers. I did go on an interview for subbing in alternative ed and that was just the basic interview. It was weird, that at the end the interviewer said : "well, if this is what you want to do, then this is what we'll do" As in "I have no idea why you would want to sub for us, but hey, it's your decision" lol.
    At one point I subbed for 2 different districts. I didn't wake up to get dressed on the days I wasn't scheduled, but one district would post jobs at exactly 6 am for that day, these were jobs submitted the night before, so they were last minutes. I would watch those like a hawk, and kept refreshing the screen, because most jobs would be gone by 6:30 pm. I got a lot of last minute jobs like that. It was the same thing the night before, at 7 pm, if yo didn't watch it, by 7:30 all the jobs were gone. This was a K-8 district that used Subfinder.
    The alt ed district used Aesop, and that would just have jobs pop up whenever, I wasn't a fan of that system, but I got 90% of my jobs through direct contact with teachers. also they had a secretary in each region that would call us, so I think the system was just a back up. Knowing them face-to-face really helped.

    So once you start subbing, figure out how the system works, it can make a big difference.
     
  4. heatherberm

    heatherberm Cohort

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    Jul 6, 2016

    The only real interview I had for subbing consisted of pretty basic questions. How do you handle classroom management? What would you do if there were no sub plans? What age do you have experience with already? The other interview for subbing I had was really just them explaining what they expect from subs, what the procedures are, that kind of thing. Most districts need subs so they're not going to cut you unless you're REALLY a disaster. So don't stress yourself out too much. :)

    As for how much work you'll get and how much warning you'll have, that'll really depend on the district. Every district I ever subbed for used some kind of online/call system where you got advance notice about jobs and could pick up jobs in the future, but there's always last minute morning-of jobs too. Sometimes teachers know they're going to be out ahead of time, sometimes they don't. So I'd guess it'll be a mix of both.

    As for other part-time work, I didn't do anything but sub the year I subbed, but I don't see why you couldn't do something else, especially if you can set up a firm schedule anywhere else you work so you know exactly when you'll be available to sub and when you won't. Depending on how much you work elsewhere it might eliminate you from multiple day sub jobs, but that's about the only con I can think of. I didn't have any problem keeping myself busy with just subbing but I was also subbing in a few different districts.
     
  5. Kat.

    Kat. Companion

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    Jul 11, 2016

    Thank you guys so much for the advice! I'm pretty nervous seeing as how badly I need the experience but I'm still optimistic.
     
  6. Kellie McGrath

    Kellie McGrath Companion

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    Jul 11, 2016

    I actaully had a sub interview today. It was basically a toned down regular education job interview with basic questions about why I would be a good fit, how would I handle a rowdy class etc. Then they explained their system and took my paperwork. I don't know where you are but the guy today told me that basically if I was flexible about the types of jobs I wanted I could work everyday. They use subs for not only absences, but for IEP meetings, department meetings, PDS etc. I signed up to sub in my town and the 4 that directly surround me hoping that between all of those I can work almost everyday.
     
  7. Kat.

    Kat. Companion

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    Jul 12, 2016

    I think it went well! It was different than any other interview I've gone on. I went to the district's board room and there were 8 or so other people interviewing. We all sat down and filled out a questionnaire and were called up one by one to talk to the lady from HR for a few minutes. I was the 4th person called up and I feel like I was talking with her for a decent amount of time.

    I guess we shall see! :)
     
  8. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Jul 12, 2016

    I had two substitute interviews out of the 11 districts I was signed up for last year. One was very in-depth (I had previously failed in an attempt to get a full-time job in that district), and the other was legitimately 5 minutes long when they asked why I was subbing and did I have a license.

    So they come in all types.
     
  9. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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    Jul 12, 2016

    Questions I had been asked:

    1) how would you handle getting to an assignment where the teacher didn't leave any lessons or plans?
    2) How would you handle disrespectful students in a class you were subbing?
    3) Why do you want to sub/teach? Why in our district?
    4) What do you do to communicate with the teacher how things went or areas of concern?
     
  10. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    Jul 24, 2016

    They will take literally anyone these days, such is the acute shortage in Pa. My friend is a building sub, and one of the questions she was asked was what would you do if there was an armed intruder in the school. She said she would run out of the building with her class!! She still got the job!
     
  11. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Jul 30, 2016

    One thing I remember way back when I started subbing--I hated it. Since I was new and unknown at the time, I'm sure they would just put me where they needed somebody (as opposed to put me where I'm requested, or better suited). So since I got stuck in places I didn't necessarily enjoy (i.e. high school, middle school), I hated it. I dreaded hearing the phone ring in the morning. (Would almost be glad that it didn't ring, even though that obviously meant no money that day!)

    Point being: You may dislike subbing initially, but it is good experience for you. You learn how to get better, you then get known at the level that you'd like to teach, and then it becomes more enjoyable.
     
  12. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Jul 30, 2016

    So you're saying it gets better? I hope so...most on here know my thoughts on Year 1 and my dread of Year 2.
     
  13. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Jul 31, 2016

    Well, it depends what you mean. When I say it got better, I just found a level (elementary) that got me motivated to go to work every day. (You're always gonna "hate" the job, because you get paid peanuts.) And really, it isn't even the level. I also grew to be a fan at middle schools I was regularly at. It is about familiarity, becoming a regular at certain schools--then it gets a lot better. At the end (of my subbing career), I was a regular at probably three or four schools, being known by kids and staff.

    But like I said, it will always kinda suck because you don't have your own classroom. The only other positive (as I look back), is how easy subbing was (compared to your own classroom :p
     
  14. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Jul 31, 2016

    I'm not overly worried about the paycheck thankfully. I'm more worried about not having a classroom and doing something I love.

    All in all, I'm a pretty lucky guy all told. So there's that :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2016

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