Substitute Qualifications

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ross, Nov 9, 2008.

  1. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Nov 9, 2008

    I have seen several posts recently about less than stellar performances by substitutes. I also know that depending on the area, some school districts require no more than a warm body to be in the classroom for the regular teacher.

    Both of these are unacceptable. What lesson do the students learn from an unqualified individual supposedly representing authority, learning, and responsibility standing in front of them? They gradually have a diminished opinion of teachers, substitutes, and other figures of authority. One of the outcomes is they can become more unruly and disrespectful to everyone.

    My question to all the teachers is, why can you not as a group approach your school districts and ask or even implore them to raise the hiring standards for substitutes. A Bachelors degree in any subject would be a good minimum requirement. That simply means that one has attended enough school to recognize what a good classroom environment looks like from the standpoint of teaching and learning.

    Secondly, there should be some sort of training program for the substitute to attend instead of the old, "Oh, you will figure it out as you go along." No, some will never figure it out and in the process do damage in the classroom.
     
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  3. Mrs. Q

    Mrs. Q Cohort

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    Nov 9, 2008

    I completely agree. Here, you only have to have a high school diploma. What training is that to teach for a day? In my hometown, my sister subbed for a while and they didn't even have a training/orientation. She called me for advice quite often. I subbed in a much larger district and we at least had a 1-day training and quite a long list of protocols.
     
  4. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    Nov 9, 2008

    If the requirements went up and the training was mandated the pay demand would go up.Many districts facings a budget crisis would not go for it.It is not easy to find substitutes in many areas today.This might make it more difficult.I agree it is a great idea,I just wonder if it would work?
     
  5. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Nov 9, 2008

    Yes, I'm surprised that a Bachelor's degree isn't required in many states. It's required in mine along w/ the passing of the CBEST. I became a sub in 1999 (& have been a resource specialist since then & am back to subbing because I've returned to school to work toward a 2nd Masters). I never had to be interviewd & all they had was a single meeting (like a new teacher orientation mtg) where they go over procedures, how to fill out the time card, etc. I personally feel that that's all I needed & have been a great sub ever since, but not everyone is like me.

    I don't know what my district does for new subs these days, but in my opinion, as long as a BA or BS is required, I don't think anything more than a mtg is required.

    I mean if these substitutes don't have the common sense to handle the job & know right from wrong, that's their problem & if they end up being fired, so be it.
     
  6. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Nov 9, 2008

    Sadly, most of our substitutes are retired teachers. And, they skip things because they "don't feel like (want to) teaching it." :mad:
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 9, 2008

    Oh, NJ has standards...just doesn't mean though that someone with some college credits actually knows what they are doing in a classroom. All I ask is that you follow the plans, follow the plans, follow the plans...(I write my plans for subs as if they were in the 'Dummy' series of books: ...not implying that subs are dummies, just that I leave NOTHING up for guess...) And we can ask all we want for better subs...turns out the good 'teacher candidates' who would sub are always booked as subs, or have arranged LTS positions or are doing some other job for the year...that leaves you with the limited # of really good subs, some OK ones and a few 'any warm body will do in a pinch' types...
     
  8. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Nov 9, 2008

    I looked up the requirements online and here is what they say for our district:

    Daily Substitute Teachers
    Salary: $80.00 per full day ($40.00 per half day)
    Hours: 7.33 hours per full day (3.66 hours per half day)

    Minimum Qualifications:
    Need some college coursework
    Attend an orientation
    Pass a background check
    Be free of Tuberculosis

    I've had homeschool parents show up (with their own child in tow!!! which is so totally against the rules), and people who have no idea what a lesson plan is. The past 2 times the district has provided a sub, I have been less than satisfied.

    Now our building sub and a couple of subs I know personally that I call when I have the opportunity are wonderful! They know how to keep order without being mean, and how to get through a lesson, but that isn't the norm in our district.

    There are many, many times (especially during flu season) when teachers put in for a sub, and none is available!! So we just have to double up our classes! We are a large district, the pay isn't horrible, and our school has an excellent reputation, so if we aren't getting a sub, imagine how bad it is for the schools that have tough reputations!!!
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 9, 2008

    We hashed this out about a month ago. Without injecting my own personal bias, the reasons included:

    - a huge range in the availiability of qualified subs. In some regions, teaching jobs are so hard to find that virtually all subs are certified teachers, looking to get their "foot in the door." But in others, there simply are no college educated professionals available to sub.

    - Some districts simply cannot or will not pay enough to attract the people some teachers would like to see in the classroom.

    - It's incredibly hard to quantify what makes a good sub-- or a good classroom teacher for that matter. While some think that am BA should be a minimal requirement, others say that there are a number of incredibly poor teachers with degrees. If we could decide exactly what makes a good teacher, and/or a good sub, it would be easier to demand those qualifications. But two people with identical qualifications are going to have distinct differences in their classroom perforrmance.

    - Some districts are struggling under the weight of so many larger problems that this one simply doesn't make the top of the list.

    Here's the thread: http://forums.atozteacherstuff.com/showthread.php?t=71548
     

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