Subbing vs Instructional Assistant...Help!

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by loveteaching4, Jul 24, 2015.

  1. loveteaching4

    loveteaching4 New Member

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    Jul 24, 2015

    Hi Everyone!

    I just received my teaching credential and have been applying for full time teaching positions for this school year. I have only had a few interviews and I'm starting to lose hope. :( I am now considering subbing or being an instructional assistant with the hopes of eventually being hired as a full time teacher.

    Here is my dilemma: I've been given different views from people on whether subbing or being an instructional assistant is better to later be hired for a full time position. I'm already a sub in a couple of districts and I've heard this is a good way to make contacts since a lot of districts like to hire their subs first for full time teaching positions. I know some people who were hired full time after being a sub. On the other hand, a school wants to interview me for an instructional assistant, and I've heard this district likes to hire full time teachers from within.

    What should I do?? Please help me! I would really appreciate any advice on which option might be better to get a full time teaching job in the future!
     
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  3. ST13

    ST13 Companion

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    Jul 25, 2015

    Honestly I've heard success stories from both. I had a friend who was a TA in her elementary school for a year and they ended up giving her a leave replacement for an entire year because their was a lot going on with the actual teacher.

    I also know someone from my own district where I sub who became a permanent sub and actually interviewed for a teaching position in the school for next year and got it!

    It also depends on your state and what might end up working better in the long run. For example, here in NY once you get your certification you have 5 years to get your masters degree and 3 years of your own classroom which is equivalent to 540 days of subbing. In this case, being a TA does not count which is why in NY a lot of us who just got their certification choose to sub because it helps us get our professional certification.

    I've never been a TA before, but I would assume there are pros and cons to it just like their are pros and cons to subbing. Some pros for subbing: flexible schedule, if you don't like a class you can pick another class instead, you can work in multiple districts and schools, no responsibilities after work
    Cons: inconsistent schedule which leads to inconstant pay, low respect from students at times, you can be called minutes before you actually have to go in, you might not know the content you are teaching, you really have no background of the class or kids at first until you've subbed multiple times.

    The one thing I really like about TA is that you get to see a classroom routine from beginning to end which to me would be a really great learning experience ... Never having my own classroom I would love to see how a teacher implements routines and rules firsthand
     
  4. cymru3

    cymru3 Rookie

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    Jul 25, 2015

    I was in the same situation a year ago. For me, it sadly had to come down to money. Pay and benefits as a TA were guaranteed, whereas as a sub they were not. For our personal situation, having a job with inconsistent pay would not have worked for us, so TAing it was. I ended up getting a teaching job in a totally different district but it all worked out in the end.
     
  5. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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    Jul 25, 2015

    I agree with the post above. Finances is a big deal. I wish I could say one or the other is a garaunteed in or fix. However, the reality is it varies greatly by district. One may think subbing was all the experience you needed. Others value teaching assistance, not all districts measure the level of experience with the same ruler.

    Having worked as both a sub and an aide. I greatly appreciated the knowledge k learned working as an aide. I was able to see classroom management routines. I was able to see what the teachers wanted/expected from the aides. Which in turn helped me when I had my own classroom assistant. Both have great pros and cons...it really is something that the individual needs to decide
     
  6. loveteaching4

    loveteaching4 New Member

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    Jul 25, 2015

    Thank you so much for all your input!! :)
     
  7. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Jul 25, 2015

    When I first graduated, just about everyone was either a sub or an aide before getting a full-time position, and the schools hired from within their sub/aide/student teacher pools most of the time.

    I choose to be a substitute because I have a secondary degree. I did not get benefits with that position, but I did get to work all but 5 days that year because most of the subs preferred elementary. I only subbed high school and middle school unless the sub coordinator had not upper-level position that day. I ended up being hired by both schools where I subbed.

    Had I gone for the aide position, I would have had benefits, but the only aide positions were in the elementary schools where I had no desire to ever teach. I would have felt like I was wasting my time there.

    Definitely think of things like that.
     
  8. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Jul 25, 2015

    TA's get benefits
    Subs do not

    Also, one of my friends started out as an Assistant for a couple years since she couldn't find a full-time teaching job. And since she was qualified, they also let her sub in the building she was working in whenever they needed one (and bumped up her pay for those days)
    She eventually got a full-time teaching position that way since everyone in the building knew her!

    SOOOO, I would say being a TA is better because of benefits PLUS you get to sub whenever needed (if they allow it, but I don't see why not), and you'd be working full-time whereas subs don't work everyday. As a TA, you'd also get paid for any holidays & breaks
     
  9. 4815162342

    4815162342 Companion

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    Jul 25, 2015

    I dont think the aides at my previous school did. They were paid hourly and did not get a check over the winter break/summer because they weren't clocking any hours.

    I guess this varies from district to district.
     
  10. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Jul 25, 2015

    Oh :( Yes, I guess it depends on district. My friend was also an hourly aide, but she did get paid during breaks/holidays (minus summer)!
     
  11. msrosie

    msrosie Rookie

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    Jul 25, 2015

    For me, subbing all the way. Subs get paid more than aides do and if you're in more than one district, it's totally possible to work nearly everyday.
     
  12. ST13

    ST13 Companion

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    Jul 25, 2015

    While many districts do offer benefits for their TAs it's important to remember that not ALL districts do. In fact, not all districts even have full day TAS.

    My home district doesn't offer benefits because TAs are usually only half day ... Unless they are a one on one for a specific child (sometimes even those TAs are half day too and switch with someone else.

    However, in the district right next to mine TAs are full day and get benefits

    So that's another thing to consider and research. A lot of circumstances depend on the district. Someotimes it even varies by school.
     
  13. Stlteach89

    Stlteach89 Rookie

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    Jul 26, 2015

    Where I live, subs didn't get benefits and assistants did. As an assistant, I was paid hourly but was also paid over breaks. I personally thought it was better when I was an assistant than when I was a sub.
     
  14. Sunskyteach

    Sunskyteach Rookie

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    Jul 26, 2015

    I know exactly what you're going through! After my first year teaching my position was eliminated and I had to start all over. I had a few promising interviews the following summer but no offers. Eventually I took a job as a long term substitute which turned into me replacing that teacher when she chose not to return. Long term subbing worked for me and can be a good option!
     
  15. loveteaching4

    loveteaching4 New Member

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    Jul 26, 2015

    Wow, thank you for all the great advice! I clearly have a lot to consider but it is so helpful hearing from everyone! It seems like I can't go wrong either way and should just make the decision that is right for me.
     
  16. smile3

    smile3 Rookie

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    Jul 27, 2015

    Aide-

    Foot in the door in the district. Most districts are always looking for subs. Also I subbed in the schools and was an aide. I put the aide experience on my resume and not the subbing- As an aide you can learn alot about the district- as a sub you are placed where ever they need you so its not a bad position but you receive more consistency as an aide and learn more
     
  17. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Jul 27, 2015

    I've heard success stories from both ends, but there are a couple of factors. First off, it depends on the district. One good idea is to look at the board minutes for the district. You can see who was hired for full time positions and then go back further to see if that person had a connection to the district - was that person a sub or an aide before they were hired full time? I've looked at board minutes for certain districts in the past to see if I've noticed trends in how their new hires started.

    Also, as a sub is the district small enough that you feel like your face would be known? My first year out of school, I subbed in a district that was very large and they had 500+ subs. I was subbing in a different school almost everyday and I felt like it was difficult for many people to get to know me, so in that district I felt that an aide would have been the way to go.

    I would say though that if you can find a district to sub in that DOES hire people from their sub list full time that could be the way to go. What if a position or LTS position in a neighboring district opens up mid-year? You can be available to interview throughout the year and wouldn't have to worry about asking off from your aide job or quitting midyear to take a position.
     

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