Subbing in an all (almost) Autistic school... ideas for work?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by AnthonyA, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. AnthonyA

    AnthonyA Rookie

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    Dec 3, 2009

    I subbed in an all Special Ed school and the majority of the children were Autistic. I floated from room to room so really got quite the experience! Yes, that was my first time ever working with Autistic children. I asked the paras what they do with them in terms of academics and they looked at me as if to say.."Are you kidding?!"

    Anyway, what do I teach low functioning, non-verbal Autistic children??!!! I was never able to figure that out by the end of the day.

    Thanks in advance!!! :)
     
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  3. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Dec 3, 2009

    Vocational activities are good for the lowest of the low, such as sorting colored shapes into buckets.
     
  4. positiveautism

    positiveautism Comrade

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  5. amaran20

    amaran20 Rookie

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    I teach a PreK Autism class and we mostly do activities such as matching shapes/colors/numbers. We also do a lot of fine motor skills like cutting, coloring and picking up objects with tongs. It depends on the age group and level of functioning. My experience is mostly with very young, low-functioning children with Autism.
    If it seems that they get a lot of play time, use that time for learning social skills. That can be just as important as academic skills.
     
  6. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Dec 5, 2009

    Academic is relative...

    find the matching item is a academic skill, because it's pre-math AND pre-reading (if you can distinguish between a Lego and a cup, you're going to have a hard time differentiating letters or numbers from ech other!)... if they can do that, you move on to similar items, photos, line drawing, colors, shapes, letters, numbers, etc...

    Puzzles are academic (spatial relations)

    Taking turns (whether with a peer or an adult) is a valuable skills...

    As amaran said, fine motor activities are essential... and I always do a lot of art/craft activities... we're experiencing textures (paint, glue, feathers, sand, etc) and cause-and-effect (oh, when I put this marker on the paper, it makes colors!). These things are academic, they just might not look like it to an untrained eye ;)
     

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