sub par facilities

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by stepka, Oct 29, 2008.

  1. stepka

    stepka Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    363
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 29, 2008

    I'm probably picking a scab off of a wound here, but I've been subbing for sped in 7 different school districts for a couple of months now, and working every day. One thing I've noticed is that the sped classrooms are generally located in dark corners of the basement, are often tiny and cramped, and that they don't have the bells and whistles that the regular classrooms often do. My kids' school is well equiped with smartboards in every classroom, but you guessed it, not in the resource room. I don't have to ask why this is--I can guess, but I resent it highly for the kids, who could benefit so much from having better materials available to them. Have any of you noticed this too? It seems terribly discriminatory.
     
  2.  
  3. Teach96

    Teach96 Comrade

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 29, 2008

    It all depends. Unfortunately this is more often not the exception but the rule. I have wonderful room and could have all the bells and whistles but choose not to and my school is willing to let me spend my share on the things that are important to me. I have a kitchen and am trying to get a washer and dryer. I do have a document camera and projector which has been awesome but a smart board would not worth the money because it's not how I teach.

    Having said that, I should clarify that I do have a Masters in educational tech, so I'm an advocate for any technology that does increase learning.
     
  4. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    2,019
    Likes Received:
    19

    Oct 30, 2008

    Many SPED classrooms classrooms I've subbed in have mismatched chairs, broken table legs ... but others are very nice. I wonder if it has to do with a big turnaround in teachers so the classrooms never get taken care of properly.
    I think I'd freak out if I saw a classroom tucked in a dark basement corner ... how utterly disheartening.
     
  5. stepka

    stepka Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    363
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 30, 2008

    Yes, I've seen that a couple of times at least, but all have been cramped. It's true that there are fewer kids in a sped room, but often 2 and 3 teachers share the same classroom, and there are more materials to store, since you have kids on so many different levels. I love subbing for sped, but what I have seen has made me decide to get certified for a regular classroom.
     
  6. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    987
    Likes Received:
    3

    Oct 31, 2008

    I must say that my district is on the whole quite accommodating for special ed. My first year was at the middle school & I had a huge classroom, windows, carpet, built in cabinets, new desks just like all the other classrooms. It lacked other things like supplies & books, bookcases, etc. But I replaced a retiring male teacher who didn't even have the courtesy to order notebook paper & pencils for me.

    When I transferred to the elementary, I had a similar classroom. Carpet, bulletin boards, built in cabinets, a counter, 2 student computers, built in book shelves, a bathroom. Now that I have been moved into my current room, it isn't as nice as it is a renovated room not new construction. But, I have always been given what I request. We had a generous budget as well. I have a smart board, and so does another sped teacher. Another sped teacher has a lot of stuff in her room...she created an autism unit even though it's not called that.

    But, I also have seen the dark basement corner rooms, and even taught in one my first year. It is completely unfair and I agree that these are the kids that should have more $$$ spent on them, especially as they bring in more $$$.
     
  7. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 31, 2008

    I have found that I usually have to move rooms every year, depending on how many students I have and not their actual needs. Case in point. Last year, I had more self contained students, and so I had a nice, normal sized kindergarten classroom with a sink. This year I am sharing my autism classroom with the ESL teacher and the gifted education teacher. True that I only have three self-contained students, but I'm also case managing and thus, working with resource kiddos and reading intervention groups. My kiddos with autism are sooooo auditorily distracted by what else is going on in the room, even though we've done our level best to divide and structure it visually. There are some times when there is just so much going on in there, door's always opening and closing, etc.

    And it gets really old to move your entire classroom and all of your materials year after year.
     
  8. Giggles1100

    Giggles1100 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Messages:
    398
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 1, 2008

    I am stuck in a room with no windows, but we do have a kitchen and washer and dryer. My tables are great and I get a lot of supplies like bookshelves etc off of freecycle.org and we were able to get a motorskills lab put into our room with mats, lifts, balls etc. The teachers before me never asked for the stuff and I found the school itself could not help me, they said look into the special Ed budget, which my SPED dept head said no we need the money for resource and other areas, so when the OT and PT came and I said I needed stuff to work with, they were able to get me more stuff included tables that better fit my wheelchairs etc, it comes out of their budget to fit the kids on their cases loads that are in my class and we all benefit. They said alot of people don't realize that you can get more stuff for their classrooms thru the providers that service your kids, like smatboards, etc. We just got our first smartboard thru our SLP, not our schools SPED budget it was through the district SPD budget.

    Teach 96, I just got my laptop from the district by reaching my level 1 tech competency, I am working on level 2 right now to get a document camera, I am not sure what a document camera is, I was just mandated by my principal that all returning teachers should be level 2 certified by Christmas.

    I will admit I am just now trying to incorporate more technology into my class, but using the internet on my TV to show videos etc of what we are learning and letting them use it to find info on what we are talking about. How do you use your document camera in your class, you got me a little excited to finish my competency if I can get something I can actually use in class, most things they offer me I cannot use because my classroom is so low.
     
  9. Teach96

    Teach96 Comrade

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 2, 2008

    A document camera is the overhead projector of the 2000s. It allows you to project anything on your screen without having to make a overhead.

    I use it to read books to the class. I don't have to have a big book but project it so that can follow along with me.

    I also use it for my morning message. I then have the students come up and circle all the verbs, nouns, etc. (my handwriting is bad so I type the message and print it out)

    I also used it to teach them a dice game. I could roll the dice on the table and the document camera projected it as I played with one of the students.

    I'd go for level 2 if you can get one of these. It's awesome!
     
  10. Giggles1100

    Giggles1100 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Messages:
    398
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 2, 2008

    Oh Thanks I need one of these
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. waterfall,
  2. Backroads
Total: 350 (members: 7, guests: 312, robots: 31)
test