stuttering

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by txmomteacher2, Oct 8, 2014.

  1. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Connoisseur

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    Oct 8, 2014

    Help! I have a student who stutters. I have all ready mentioned to our speech therapist but who know when she will have time to help him. ( we have one for our entire district and she is spread thin!!!!!) Mom has asked me twice, once at meet the teacher and then again yesterday at parent conference. She isn't being ugly just wants help. So until speech can help him what should I be doing?
     
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  3. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 8, 2014

    You have to get the parent or admin to push for a speech eval/SLP to move a bit quicker
     
  4. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Oct 8, 2014

    Might sound weird, but can you have him sing when he wants to speak? I had a child like that once and parents refused help for him. He was quite creative and loved to make up silly songs. We had him make a silly song when he wanted to speak about something...no stuttering when he sang. Many of the other kids joined in and would sing their spelling sentences, sang when they read along, etc. It was a fun year...it was also the year that the Twin Towers came down and I had a class of 36 first graders. Quite a memorable year for many reasons.
     
  5. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Oct 12, 2014

    I have a student with a very severe stutter but because it's not impacting him academically he receives services outside of school. He did receive speech in school in K and 1st grade I think. Maybe the mom can get a referral from the pediatrician?

    Not sure how it works at your school...but at our school if a child needs to be referred for services like speech the parent could write a letter to the school based support team that handles IEPs. Technically the child needs to be tested to see if they require services within a certain number of days of the school receiving that letter.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 12, 2014

    Tell mom to submit a written request for speech evaluation. Most likely there is sped law dictating a timeline once such a request is received by which the SLP or child study team would have to respond.
     
  7. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 12, 2014

    Most states have a 30 day maximum. I believe IDEA states 60 days.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 12, 2014

    The OP didn't list her state and I'm sure she could find out her state particulars if she needs them. The idea is for the mom to get involved in the process in a way that leads to qualified intervention...which generally requires a written request for formal assessment.
     
  9. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Connoisseur

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    Oct 12, 2014

    Thanks guys for the information. The speech therapist is aware and is getting around to us. Like I said we have one speech person for an entire district. We aren't that small so she is pretty busy. What I need is ideas to help him in my classroom.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 12, 2014

    Some ideas here:

    http://www.stutteringhelp.org/8-tips-teachers
     
  11. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Oct 12, 2014

    I stuttered when I was little and it was awful. I've never really talked about it with anyone actually. It felt so shameful.
    It started when I switched schools in 2nd grade. Then when I went to high school, I had a fresh start so it went away and then a stressful moment brought it back on at the end of freshmen year.
    Then it was awful again.
    When I came to this country, it went away completely (it's been over 20 years). I think it had something to do with speaking in a second language, I guess my brain accepted the fact that it's ok for me to have long pauses, because I might be just thinking of what to say, and that relaxed me. All this was on the subcontious level, but I thik that's what happened. I haven't stuttered in my native language since then.

    Here are some things from my experience:
    - singing does help, but I could never sing.
    - chewing gum helps. That's what really saved me. I'm not sure if it was Socrates or Aristotle who stuttered or told a student who stuttered to put a bunch of small rocks under his tongue when he speaks. I tried it with gum and it really improved everything. Just having gum in my mouth helped.
    - being spontaneous helped. Raising hands, waiting for the teacher to call on me, or having the teacher call on me randomly raised my stress levels and that made it worse. It was great when we had discussions where we could just speak, without raising hands. When I felt I could say something, I went for it and it worked. (maybe you could work out a signal with your student?)
    - distractions, feeling that the other person is not paying attention are making it much worse.
    - anything increasing stress levels, performance anxiety, etc makes it worse. That includes calling on the student to read.


    I have a student now whose stuttering just became really bad. I had him before, never knew about it, then he got locked up and when he was released 2 weeks ago, I notice it a lot.
    I think he's compensating with misbehavior and being the classclown, thinking that the kids are laughing at him all the time, because he's funny, so if he stutters, and they laugh, he can make believe that it's because he's funny or at least it won't be that obvious.
     
  12. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Oct 13, 2014

    Can the mom be proactive and get an evaluation done on her own so that she has something in writing to give to the district?
     
  13. olivecoffee

    olivecoffee Companion

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    Oct 13, 2014

    I stutter. I spoke with my son's SLP about it. I've been doing my own strategies for the last 15 or so years, but it's gotten worse with stress.

    -Tell him to speak quietly. The SLP told me that when we speak louder, the muscles in our mouth are more tense.
    -Have him pause while he talks. I pause all the time when I speak, especially before a word over which I'll anticipate stuttering.
    -Hand gestures help me!
    -Singing through the words/sentences like mentioned above. That helps.
    -Help him learn how to substitute certain words for words over which he stutters. Sometimes "dad" is hard for me to say because of the /d/. I'll say "father" instead. If I have to say "it's your responsibility," and I know I may stutter over the /b/ in -bility, I'll say "you are responsible for..."

    I didn't catch what grade you're in, but talk to him and see if he would like to talk about it with the class. I started giving spelling tests in my ST classroom. I wanted to announce my stuttering to the class, but my CT said not to at first. After the second spelling test when I obviously stuttered, I told her that my stuttering is obvious and I wanted to address. There was a kid who made fun of me, and I didn't want to address it because it hurt my feelings: I wanted to address it for the sake of acceptance. We read a read aloud book the next day. I want to say it was something like, "I am like you, you are like me." It was a kindergarten book that worked well, even though we were in third grade. We started the conversation off by asking the kids to share when they've seen someone different - someone in a wheelchair, someone with a cane, etc. Then I said that I'm different, too. I told them I stutter and told them what it meant, then I told them I'm just like them. Stuttering doesn't affect who you are as a person, it just makes it hard to say what you want to say.

    After we read the book and talked about it, I swear a weight was lifted off my shoulders. It's one thing knowing the kids KNOW you stutter because they hear it. It's entirely different knowing the kids know you stutter because we talked about and that they accept you. Any time I stuttered after that, they just waited and smiled at me. I wasn't nervous any more, and nervousness plays a big part in stuttering.

    Sorry for the long post! I just wanted to share because I go through this every day. A SLP will really help, but if he works on strategies to minimize stuttering on his own, he will feel better. I don't know if stuttering will ever go away (mine didn't), but it can become manageable if it doesn't. The single most important thing I ever did was "come out" about it. I tried to hide my stuttering for so long because I was ashamed, and sometimes that just made it worse. It made me not want to talk in front of any one. Now, I tell everyone and the stress of having to hide my fluency disorder is gone.
     
  14. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Oct 13, 2014

    My student who stutters reads out loud (whispers) most students in my class don't do this anymore. He also reads very, very slowly- to the point where he often has trouble finishing work even with extra time. Would it be better to try to get him to read in his head? He's stuttering somewhat when we reads, if he read in his head wouldn't he read more fluently? He reads on grade level and has no comprehension problems, he just works so slowly.
     
  15. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Oct 13, 2014

    In TX, if a parent requests an evaluation in writing, the district has 15 days to either move forward with the evaluation or decline to evaluate. If they decide to move forward, then the SLP has 45 days from consent from parent to test, then another 30 before going to a meeting. If the strategies that are being used aren't being effective, I might tell mom to put that request in writing.
     
  16. littlemiskinder

    littlemiskinder Rookie

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    Oct 14, 2014

    You could even ask the speech teacher for a packet to send home (and use in the classroom) with strategies to practice while you wait for her to get around to him.
     

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