Students with Other Health Impairments

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by MzB, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. MzB

    MzB Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 2, 2005

    Does anyone work with students with this as their disability? I have two children with health issues, and they terrify me. One, in addition to his CP has seizures. He had one in class yesterday. Scared the life outta me, because he couldn't come out of it, and they had to administer D--, can't remember the whole name, and call 911. He eventually came out (17 minutes) and is ok, but I almost lost it twice. I broke down in the car. I think what got me most was the fact that it was almost time to get on the bus. If he had......

    The other child has puliminary hypertension and has a stadey flolan pump drip. If the pump malfunctions (and it has before last summer, so I hear) he has 6-8 MINUTES to get another one started, or he can DIE. THIS BOTHERS ME SOOOOOOOOOOOO MUCH! His IV cord hangs outside his body, and I worry about someone accidentally snagging it, or intentioally grabbing it.

    I love my boys already, they are cute as pie, but, they just make me worry. I'd pass out if something happened to them period, but especially at school.

    Just venting and seeing if anyone else has this issue...
     
  2.  
  3. jcg

    jcg Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    645
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 2, 2005

    I have felt like you. I had a student with diabetes. I tried to learn everything I could and that seemed to help. I also expressed my concerns to the parents(who turned out to be very understanding and helpful) and the school nurse. We had a health plan to follow if something did go wrong with specific steps for me to take. We also had other staff members trained to come to the classroom if there was an issue. I also have taught special ed where there were a lot of health issues. I had one student who had 10 to 20 seizures a day. I was very nervous at first, but found out that training does decrease the worrying and fears. My suggestion is to request or demand training on the symptoms and procedures. Once you understand it, it becomes less scary.
     
  4. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,630
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 2, 2005

    MzB,
    Don't these little ones have an aide or special worker that stays with them at all times, to be there for such situations. I would think this would be something requested for in an IEP. Maybe that's wishful thinking but.... They have life threatening disabilities.........I couldn't imagine having to deal with that, so very sad and truly scary! Could that be something to look into? This is also very traumatic for your other little ones in the classroom as well. I feel for all of you :love:
     
  5. jcg

    jcg Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    645
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 2, 2005

    Under other health impairments, they may not have an IEP. They usually fall under section 504. Other arrangements need to be made. IEPs are only for kids in certain categories and are not necessarily related to physical health concerns.
     
  6. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,630
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 2, 2005

    Oh, I see, thanks for explaining that to me. :) Those poor little kiddos!
     
  7. wvsasha

    wvsasha Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 11, 2005


    oh if this were only true.....here in WV, an inordinate amount of what should be 504 kids, are special ed. kids. These kids have asthma, diabetes, ADD, etc and because their 'disability' can affect their ability to learn, they qualify for special education.

    And we're not allowed to write into the IEP "needs aide" -- serious hand smacking goes on there if we do, and it gets rewritten.

    Just demand training, also demand backup personnel be trained as well - and not necessarily administrators, they're out of the building in meetings all too often. Have plans drawn up - crisis intervention plans. Put them in notebooks that are highly visible and make mention of them when leaving plans for a substitute.

    See if you can get in contact with whatever responding 911 people you would be working with so they can become familiar with the child(ren) and their health issues. We have stations with rescue squads scattered around the region so we know which squads come when we call 911.

    Good luck - familiarity & planning will help greatly.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. txmomteacher2,
  2. miss-m,
  3. TeacherNY,
  4. RainStorm
Total: 347 (members: 5, guests: 310, robots: 32)
test