Students with ED and Finding Balance

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by sunbeachgirl, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. sunbeachgirl

    sunbeachgirl Rookie

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    Oct 15, 2012

    Dedicating time to students

    Hello everyone,
    I'm a high school resource teacher and see my students for one period a day (they are in gen ed for the rest of the day). I have two students who are depressed and it seems like they take up all of my time. Today I had to leave my aide alone with my class while I dealt with a crying meltdown outside. When the students are in my class, I have to sit next to them or they get NOTHING done.
    My other students are beginning to ask why I spend so much time with the other students and "ignore" them. Sadly, my aide is unable to deal with any of these situations. He taught in a high-stress school and had a total nervous breakdown so he avoids any difficult situations like the plague.


    How do you find a balance and dedicate equal amounts of time to all students?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 15, 2012

    It's never going to be equal amounts for all. :(Some kids need more from you....but no one should need so much attention that some get none.
     
  4. sunbeachgirl

    sunbeachgirl Rookie

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    Oct 15, 2012

    Yes, of course I understand that. I try to help everyone, but if I leave these students alone for too long they will not get anything done. It's a shame.
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 15, 2012

    Do you think that there might be some attention-seeking behaviors or manipulation going on?

    Have you tried rewarding students for working independently?
     
  6. sunbeachgirl

    sunbeachgirl Rookie

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    Oct 18, 2012

    It's possible. I know they need attention and like getting attention from me. Whenever I propose that they work with my aide, they say they suddenly don't need help anymore.
    I like the idea of rewarding students for working independently.
     
  7. NickiMacaroni

    NickiMacaroni Rookie

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    Oct 21, 2012

    Maybe they could earn extra time with you BY working independently. For instance you could have a certain day when you will let students come into your class for lunch if they completed all of their work for the week. Is there someone else in the school they could talk to when they are having crying spells? I know that if it were me I would want to be there trying to talk to them and comfort them, but on the other hand you also need to be working with the other students. And it is also important for them to learn to comfort themselves and regulate their own emotions!
    I know with younger kids we had a "cooling off spot" in a corner, where upset kids could go to calm down. It was set up so it was mostly blocked from view of the other kids, and there were things in there like books, squeezy toys and "stimmies," headphones with music, etc. Maybe I'd also add some aromatherapy things like scented candles or soaps. I think it could also work with teenagers. IF they were crying you could just go to them and quietly suggest that they go into the cooling off spot (or whatever you call it) and take it easy for a few minutes, and promise that you will reserve the last five minutes of class to talk to them about whatever is going on.
    I hope that helps!
     

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