Students walked out of my class!

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by CyFair, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. CyFair

    CyFair Rookie

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    Dec 11, 2006

    I teach 6th grade language arts at a middle school. The kids have a sufficient break between classes, and all of their classrooms are very close together, so they don't have to walk across the school to get to from one place to another. They have plenty of time to use the restroom between classes. Of course the same kids ask to be allowed out of class on a regular basis, and we have a real problem with some of them causing trouble around the school. I seldom let kids out, especially those who have caused trouble in the past and constantly ask to go to the restroom.

    So today one of my students (one of the usual kids who always asks to be allowed out of class), wanted to go to the restroom, and I told him he would have to wait until after class. He then became loud and argumentative, and when I still refused to let him go, he just walked out. The entire class was waiting to see what I would do, so I just remained calm and kept on teaching, while I took a referral form and started filling it out. The boy came back, and I said nothing to him about it. (We're not really supposed to send them directly to the AP's office; we turn in our forms and wait for them to be called in several days later.) When I was finished giving the instructions and got the class started on some work, I walked over and said to him quietly, "Of course you know I had to write you up for that." He said, "But I really had to go. I really meant it that time." I just said, "Okay, but now it's between you and the AP." He tried to argue again, and I just said, "That's an interesting point. Be sure you remember to bring that up to the AP."

    THEN, about 10 minutes after boy #1 came back, another boy did the same thing. This particular boy loves to wander all over the school, and all of his teachers have been asked to keep him in class. So he asked, I said no, he got mad, I ignored his anger, and he marched out. Again, I calmly filled out his referral as the class looked on. He took a while to come back, so I suppose he was looking to see if any of his friends were out wandering the halls, which is what he likes to do.

    So that's it. I didn't make a big thing of it at all, I didn't say a word about it to the class, and I didn't make a big issue of it with the boys when they got back to my class.

    Anyway, I'm wondering if I should address this issue to the class, and if so, what should I say? I don't want them to start getting the idea that this is a cool thing to do. A lot of my students think it's cool to get in trouble, and well worth a few days of in-school suspension.

    I talked to a couple of other teachers, and they suggested that I should not allow students who do this back into my class in the future. I could either direct them to stand outside, or send them on to the AP. (As I've said, we're discouraged from doing this, but other teachers do it anyway.) I just don't know. I'm only a second year teacher, and this hasn't happened to me before. Any ideas or thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I child who leaves your class without your consent could be a huge problem. He's technically under your care, but you don't know where he is. Should the fire alarm go off, you would have a huge problem with accountability.

    I think I would let the AP know that it's suddenly become an issue. The next time it happens (translation: tomorrow) notify him as soon as the child walks out. This child is truant and missing; someone needs to track him down.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oops, sorry :)

    I'm in a Catholic high school, where things like this are considered major. I wouldn't happen twice in our school. I forget sometimes that most of the rest of the world doesn't function that way.


    I never tell a kid he CAN'T go to the bathroom. A kid who really NEEDS to go will either leave the room without consent or have a medical crisis. Instead, I tell them they need to make up the time after school. A kid who misses 5 minutes of class makes up the 5 minutes after school-- and runs the risk of missing his bus. A longer trip is a guarentee of having to take the late bus at 5:30.

    Also, consider having the kids sign out. Get a binder, and have columns: date, name, destination, time out, time back. When they ask why, you can say honestly that the administration needs to know who is where during the day. Maybe it will help.
     
  5. Major

    Major Connoisseur

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    Dec 11, 2006

    If a kid walk out of my class without my permission, he/she would NOT be allowed back in......... period.

    It sounds like your school doesn't really BACK the teachers. :(

    Major Hunt
     
  6. koocat008

    koocat008 Companion

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    The binder idea is good. I started using it because we started having a problem with kids going to the bathrooms and writing graffiti on the walls during classes. I make them write the time they leave, the time they come back, date, and name. In your situation, I would even have a reward system for students who do not abuse your bathroom procedure. If the student is in dire need of #2, then have them sign your log. But if they ask you daily for bathroom pass, then think about giving kids rewards, or something at the end of every week.

    Also, a good deterrant my teacher used on us back in highschool was making a huge board into a bathroom pass. Students don't want to walk around with something annoyingly heavy. I would address this issue to your students. Tell them that if something like this were to happen again, you will call home to ask the parents for a doctor slip if they have an issue with using the potty. that might embarrass some of them.....either way, good luck:)
     
  7. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    A teacher during my high school years required students to take a toilet seat to the restroom. I don't think that would fly now, but there are times I wish I could make my second graders carry around a huge toilet seat!
     
  8. totallybusy

    totallybusy Rookie

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    I would fill out a form for the office on all invlolved. I would contact the parents and make them aware of the situation. I would explain that unless this student has a doctor's note he will be refused bathroom during class time. Make the principal well aware of the situation. In our school we have a crisis intervention team set up. All classes have a card. In a situation whether it be illness or behaviour problems we send a child to the office with the card. The principal, assistant or out of class teacher will respond. They will come to your class to relieve you to deal with the problem or find the appropriate person to come. Whether it be the nurse, principal, Janitor, police whoever. We are so accountable. Those that leave and those still there need to be supervised immediately. Our system works very well.
     
  9. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    I had this same thought. You leave, then don't bother to come back.
     
  10. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Someone on these forms uses some kind of lottery pass system. Each student is given a set number at the beginning of the year. The way I remember it is that they can turn it in for something such as bathroom, 1 missed homework, 10% boost on a single test, etc. Whatever they have at the end of the year though (if not used) can be turned in for something special (or could skip final if they have all of them). They would then have to be responsible for deciding when it was really important to use. Having your period and no tampon on, would be important enough to use. Oh, and this was taken away each time a student was late. (keep a log). If all are used up and a student wants to leave..nope. If all are used up and a student is tardy...AP. I may have misrepresented a few of the facts here, but I thought it was a cool system.
     
  11. Giggles1100

    Giggles1100 Comrade

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    Well, now keep an open mind, my principal backs me up on this one, but Teaching Ed kids that like to do this, I require themt o do the potty dance for me before they are allowed to leave, believe me, half of them quit going because they refuse to dance to go out, especially when their friends are inteh hallway waiting for them. then I also make them carry a highly decorated toilet seat for a hall pass. But you have to clear this stuff with your principals so you do not get in trouble. Some girls are discreet about asking and I let them slip by most kids do not know when they need to go so I am not hurting others but mind you I have ED kids.
     
  12. Ann2006

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    At our school, we have one child who walks out consistently. Whoever his teacher is at the time simply calls the office and says so and so is unsupervised in the hallway without permission. This alerts security and the AP to find him ASAP....it relieves the teacher of accountability and turns the responsibility over to admin. We do not send another student after him or disrupt our class. The others get the message clear as day that if you walk out, you will be hunted!!! It works.
     
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    This is what I do as well with my couple of "repeat offenders". There's nothing like hearing, "Would Johnny Smith please return to Mrs. C's room immediately" (or to report to the office immediately) over the PA system to send a message.
     
  14. Docere

    Docere Rookie

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    That is how it is done at my school as well.

    Having a student walk out of class can actually turn into a positive. It can show the student that it really is his/her choice to be in your class and that they are in charge of themselves. That can have a huge impact on his/her feelings of personal responsibility and let the student know the consequences of their decisions.
     
  15. Going4Christ

    Going4Christ Rookie

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    "walking out"

    Hi, I'm just a high school student but I hope to teach one day :)

    I just wanted to tell you my input. At my school we have a bathroom policy... or so the teachers say. It depends on the teacher regardless if you "allowed" to go or not. It is child abuse to deny a child the right to use the restroom regardless or not if they really have to go and it can be reported and the court would rule in the student's favor. I should know ;)
    There are many students at my school who have walked out because a teacher denied them. I have yet to do this myself but one of my teachers next semester has a repetation for denying EVERYTHING. And my mother will surely let them have it if I'm denied.
    In my school's handbook all teachers are ordered never to deny a student the right to go to the restroom.

    My suggestion to you about your students walking out is basically this:
    Let them know that they cannot go out while you are teaching unless it is an emergency. And if it is an emergency make up something interesting to make them think twice!
    My spanish teacher never denies it but when people start abusing she make you set in break for however long you were out you might try that.
    Sign in and sign out sheets are great too.

    *Remember i'm just a high school student trying to help.
     
  16. Mrs LC

    Mrs LC Comrade

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    Going4Christ, keep this and, one day if you become a teacher, reread it and give yourself a laugh!

    Child abuse for not letting a child leave the room for no other reason than they want to! And threatening that your mother will "let them have it"? Bring it on! I've never heard of a court case because a teacher wouldn't let a kid go to the toilet in class time - want to cite references?

    Walking out of my classroom without permission is an immediate detention, and doing it after a confrontation results in an in-school suspension. So don't try it.

    And, incidentally, I often allow children to go to the toilet in class time. You can tell when they really need to, but then I also let my kids know that sometimes you just need a time out from the classroom. I teach them not to lie to me - if they need a drink, or a few minutes of fresh air, they tell me so politely and I make a judgement call on whether or not it is a call for help (which it sometimes is) or just yet another way to procrastinate and get out of work. But just walking out is NOT an option.
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Thanks so much for your comments. They're always welcome-- it's refreshing to see someone still in HS getting a handle on what he or she wants to do as an adult.

    But I'm fairly sure that the courts would side with the teacher. A child who is registered in my class, and marked present, is my responsibility. If she walks out, I have no idea-- or control over-- where or with whom she is. If the fire alarm were to go off, I would have to send firemen into the building to search for her, with no guarantee that she was actually in the closest ladies room. Likewise, if we were ever to go into Lockdown, there would be a huge problem. While you're in my class, I need to know exactly where you are.

    We are acting "in loco parentis"-- in place of your parents, and it's our job to keep you safe. We can't do that if we don't know where you are. So a student who leaves in a huff is a huge safety issue.

    And anyone who has been in the classroom for a while won't be phased by your mom. Once we explain the potential for harm that could come to you, the odds are good that she'll ask you just how old you are and why you didn't go before class.

    That said, I've never told a child "no." I've made them make up the time after school, thus missing the "early" bus home, but never said they couldn't go. I sometimes tell them to "pretend they're in a car" and wait a while, but I do give in. Anyone who asks to go before the bell ring is told it's OK.
     
  18. Going4Christ

    Going4Christ Rookie

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    ...

    u people don't know my mother... my teachers are frightened of her
     
  19. Mrs LC

    Mrs LC Comrade

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    That's sad.

    But at some point you will make sensible, conscious decisions about what rules need to be followed and why, without resorting to hiding behind your mother's skirts, surely? You take pride in knowing that your mum is scary to teachers? I'd be embarrassed and concerned that, if my mum didn't have mature problem solving skills, where would that leave me? Children learn from parents more than teachers.
     
  20. Going4Christ

    Going4Christ Rookie

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    meh...

    not in my case i don't claim my mother... i'm adopted and i don't claim either of my parents so i learn more from my teachers than i do from them... that explains a lot of things.
     
  21. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    LOL... That's hilarious!
     
  22. Going4Christ

    Going4Christ Rookie

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    But true... just about all my teachers know my mother.. and they all sort of well flinch when I mention her name to them. ha! ;)
     
  23. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I'm so sorry to hear you say that. My son is adopted. My heart would break if he ever implied that it makes a difference.

    And, yes, you do claim your mom. You brought her up saying she would jump to your defense if you were denied access to the bathroom. You mention that your teachers flinch each time you mention her name. I've taught every grade from 7-12, and seldom does the topic of anyone's mom come up. Yet apparently it comes up with a fairly regular basis in your classes.

    You may not have the same personality, but apparently she loves you enough to jump to your defense every time you tell her you have a problem-- otherwise how would all the teachers know of her?

    You can't have it both ways-- either she's the evil adoptive mom who should never have entered your life, or she's in your corner every time you hit a little bump in the road. I don't know you or your mom, but it sounds like the latter to me. (OK, wait. You're still a kid. For now, I guess it can be both ways. But at some time in your life you'll have to make a conscious choice to look at things from a stable perspective.)

    Now, here's my guess at what happened. Let me know if I'm close, OK?

    At some point in the past few years, you went home in tears over something. Mom sprang to your defense (again?) and went down to school. The thing mushroomed and your parents sued the school or the teacher or the district. You either won the case or settled for a cash amount out of court.

    Now, each time you mom springs to your defense (again) there are 2 adults in the room representing the school. They're not afraid of mom-- there are 2 there so that nothing can be taken out of context or misinterpreted. They're acting professionally in the best interests of the school and the taxpayers who fund it. It's not fear, it's professionalism.

    OK-- am I close?

    (Sorrry to derail the topic folks, but this one hit close to home!)
     
  24. Going4Christ

    Going4Christ Rookie

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    ...

    well... not exactly the last time i came home in tears was em.... 2nd grade when the most hated teacher of the school put me in the corner behind the bookshelf and wouldn't let me out for nothing until 3:00... my mother raised cain on that one.


    ... that teacher hurt me for life. Since then I haven't made friends or anything... i might have 2 good ones who never argue with me over petty differences....

    the reason I'm saying I don't claim my mother is because I have a longing for the woman that birthed me i wanna see her basically.

    And now only God sees my tears EVERYDAY TEARS MIND YOU.

    There is no bully policy at my school and the principle doesn't give a flying hoot. I'm probably going to be homeschooled next year.



    But nah, you didn't get even close. hmm... i'm not sure really what happened when that day happened. I have short term.
     
  25. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Going4Christ, you have an understandable longing for your birth mother. Perhaps when you are 18, you will pursue that longing with assistance from other adults. Perhaps even your adoptive mother.

    This should not interfere with your feelings for your adoptive mother, though you might see it as either/or. It really isn't. You were blessed with a parent or parents to raise you and two to give you life. You might need help accepting that and I urge you to get that help. Adoption issues can follow someone for their whole lives.

    On the other hand, being sent to the corner, no matter how traumatic, should not haunt you for your whole life. I sense that it is related to feelings of abandonment that go deeper than your 2nd grade teacher knew. This is also something that you should explore so that it doesn't continue to affect your life.

    Adoptive parents grieve their own losses, and grieve for their adoptive children when they seem haunted. We are here for an important purpose and our adoptive children are our children, no more or less than biological children. Keep this in mind as you grow in wisdom and maturity.

    I wish you consolation and empathy as you follow your path.
     
  26. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    MollyT, I would probably be fired if I even voiced your opinions, much less acted upon them.
     
  27. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Letting a child wet themselves is not an option. As teachers, we must never ignore each person's right to dignity and respect...even if they atagonize us at times. If a child disregards your judgement call, don't fight iit...when they walk out, simply let the office know. Their safety is your responsibility and having them unsupervised, in the halls, requires a call to the office. They should have someone available to find them and supervise. the amount of time betweeen classes doesn't always allow time to go to the washroom and in some situtions, there are reasons a child can't get to the bathroom during passing periods. I've had students who are afraid to go while others are in there and some who are too shy to use it with toehrs in there. Whatever the reason, we should understand and respect that not everyone is okay witht e way we must herd the class into a bathroom in lower grades or the way they have to rush in and use it during passing periods in upper grades.
    I know that when I find myself having to listen to a co worker "pee" it makes me feel awkward! Even when I use a public restroom in a mall or movie theathre, I'm always a bit glad when I realize I have the place to myself!!! Still, if a child walks out of class disrespectfully or respectfully says he/she must go NOW...call the office so they can get supervision...it's our responsibility as teachers. We have to keep an eye on them....that's the way it is!
     
  28. Ms B

    Ms B New Member

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    walking out

    Mrs. LC... As a teacher and a parent, I am saddened by your response to Going for Christ. When my son was in High School, there were several times that I had to run interference between him and disrespectful teachers. My son is quite capable of standing up for himself, yet many teachers were incredibly rude and disrespectful to him, in such a way that I felt it necessary to step in on his behalf...despite his requests for me to let him handle it himself. My son was (is) a straight A student and graduated ay ear early....he was not a discipline problem.

    My point is that there are times when a parent MUST stand up for his/her child and that our children should know that we have their backs. You have no idea why Going for Christ's mom has had to step in, so you should not judge or belittle her for doing so. Do you have that type of condescending attitude toward your students? I certainly hope not!!


     
  29. Mrs LC

    Mrs LC Comrade

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    You misread my attitude to parents - as a teacher I welcome their involvement in my classroom, and I encourage parents to come to me with issues. As a parent I am involved in my kids' education too, and I have spoken to teachers about "issues" as I have felt it necessary. I have also supported teachers where I felt it was my child in the wrong.

    My problem with GWC was not his mother's attitude (in fact, having read his subsequent posts I feel for her), it was his attitude of, "You can't touch me, I'll get my mum onto you". *That's* why I think he's got to stop hiding behind mum's skirts and grow up. If a teacher is doing wrong (and sadly, they do. Any teacher who made my child wet themselves rather than let my child go to the toilet in class time would certainly be hearing from me) then of course the child needs support. My "condescending" attitude towards GWC is a direct response to his attitude.
     
  30. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    If I were your mother, I wouldn't be so proud of myself then if that is true. Or yourself for using it as a manipulative tool, which is how your posts come across, IMHO. Getting the teachers all in a ruffle is not a way to earn respect.
     
  31. Luvin5th

    Luvin5th Rookie

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    Back to the original post:

    I have a sign in/out sheet in my class because of graffiti as well. Unfortunately I have about 5 of my 20 students who would probably attempt graffiti or roaming the halls or worse.

    I also have a positive behavior support system in my class where the students earn "punches" (start hole punches on an index card) that they can use as currency on Friday's.

    My class is in a portable and at the beginning of the year I had way to many students needing the restroom at other than scheduled breaks. For their safety I demand that they take another student with them. If a boy needs to go then a girl goes with them and vice versa! (They are not that interested in each other yet). Also, they each have two blue tickets - one light blue and one dark blue. The student requesting the restroom has to give me a ticket and they both have to sign out. On Friday's if the student has at least one ticket left and so many punches they can shop. If they don't have any tickets left, then they can't shop. Also, if they need to go and don't have any tickets left than they give me five minutes of their recess time. Let me tell you, this works like magic! My students have made great progress in training their bodies to go when we have breaks and they know it's ok when they have an emergency.
     
  32. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I teach kindergarten so bathroom can be an issue. What I do firs of all, is tal to my kids about batrhoom, how we use it, wash our hands, etc. Then I ask them why they are in school: to learn and get big smart brains. THat said, I tell my kids that if they are in the bathroom, are they learning? No, so then we talk about how important it is to go before class and during recess. Now, the reason why I kind of make a big deal about using bathroom is because last year, when I taught kindergarten, my kids had to use the batrhoom down the hallway. More than several times, I would have either a princiapl or secretary bring my kid back to class stating that they were in there playing, running around, climbing on the toilets and sink. Since then, I always discuss bathroom policy and the importance of going during break time. Some kids like to go to the batrhoom because they find this as a form of play. So, anyways, if I do have a kid, who asks during class to go, I will first ask, will you be able to wait till recess. If they say yes, then I say okay, but let me know if you really do need to go, okay. Sometimes, after 5 minutes they ask agin, and sometimes they wait till recess. I never flat out say no. Sometimes I'll say, can you wait till i'm done talking, or can you wait till we're done with this lesson? My kids, who are 5 and 6, are very good at going during recess time. They know that recess/break is for 3 things: getting a drink, bathroom, and playing. I may get 3 kids during the whole week who need to go during class. Center time is the only time that I allow them to go whenever they feel the need.
     
  33. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    I think the binder is probably the best idea. I understand what you are saying because some students do ask to go to the restroom more than others. In all honesty, I feel bad because your administration is not all that supportive. They should be willing to hear the teachers' concerns and develop a school-wide plan on them.

    If the students walk out and ignore the binder, it is VERY much the administration's concern.

    I also read the entire discourse about the high school student who posted on here. I appreciated reading the student's advice, to be honest, because though the person does not have teaching experience, (s)he also has a voice. It is really not my place to be saying my "opinions" to anyone, especially when I don't know the person, his/her adoptive mother, or the experiences he/she has encountered.

    As a teacher, I would be incredibly upset if a student had an accident and I had denied him or her of his/her privileges. Eventually when I become a parent, I would not be the most pleased if my child came home with soiled clothing.

    Perhaps contact the student's parent because no matter how old one is, a parent can still be of assistance. However if the parent offers little support, there isn't much you can do about it, besides speaking with an administrator... and that goes back to square one.
     
  34. bjweyant

    bjweyant Rookie

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    Jan 14, 2007

    CyFair - back to the original post - I think the way you handled it was fine. If I changed anything - I would maybe have notified the office that the student was out of the room - for accountability purposes. THere is no need to make a big hoopla out of a first time event. Your students knew what you were doing and what would happen if they left the classroom by watching you fill out that referral. Great job! There is no need to embarrass students by yelling at them or bringing up their issues in front of the entire classroom. By quietly taking the referral to desk and speaking to the student, you showed him some respect that he did not show you. You did not belittle him or put him in a position of having to defend his 'reputation' to his peers. You will get further that way.
     
  35. jkluttrell

    jkluttrell Rookie

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    Jan 29, 2007

    I give all students one emergency pass to use per nine weeks. If they do not use it they get 3 extra credit points added to their semester exam grade. Several teachers at my school do this and call them mercy moments. We have six minutes between class, that is sufficient time. I cannot just get up and walk out of my classroom whenever I feel the need to go to the restroom. This is a small part of teaching them preparedness and responsibility. My students know that if they want to leave (for any reason) they have to give me their emergency pass. They should not have more than one emergency during the same class period that often. Plus since they are worth extra credit they are real careful about using them. I have had students choose to leave the room even after being told no and I simply write them up for insubordination. I tell them they made their choice, I have to make mine.
     
  36. jkluttrell

    jkluttrell Rookie

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    Jan 29, 2007

    Oh and I teach high school, this would be different for little kids obviously.
     
  37. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Jan 29, 2007

    jk, that sounds like my HS biology teacher... we got 3 "red passes" good for 5 minutes each at the start of the semester. Use 'em for whatever you want, but if you use they all up, they're gone. We got a second set second semester, but most of us still had our old ones, too. We could turn them in for bonus points at the end of the grading period.
     
  38. EBKLYN

    EBKLYN Companion

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    Jan 29, 2007

    Hi Peachyness,

    I understand what you are talking about and I am blessed to have a bathroom for my kindergarteners in the classroom.

    Bathrooming can be a real pain, if just like everything else, unless you turn it into a minilesson whereby you have to be explicit about what your expectations are.
     
  39. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

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    Jan 30, 2007

    Ebklyn,

    I reckon this idea of making a mini lesson out of this issue is great! Sounds rather crude, yet really makes a lot of sense and will save time in the future in terms of not having to justify yourself and decisions made regarding students needing to use the bathroom.

    Another thing I myself have done, is to ask the students "Can you think of a time when I have walked out and left you all during a lesson because I've just HAD to use the bathroom??" (Ok, ok, this doesn't work so much if you're pregnant, as a lot of us would know!)
    But when you can explain how it's not fair for your students to be able to take a toilet break when you yourself, as the teacher, are unable to do so. It's simply not fair. You can go on to brainstorm ways they can avoid needing to use the bathroom during class ie. use time wisely during session breaks/recess/lunch time.

    If they give you a hard time for talking about all this in class and think you're gross, calmly explain that it'll be far "grosser" when one of them has an accident because they didn't use their time wisely at recess/lunch because they were too busy playing with friends. As well as this, you wouldn't have to teach them such basic common sense if they acted more adult about it all!

    Of course this doesn't refer to genuine emergencies, and, at that point, the teacher needs to make a quick judgment as to whether or not it really IS an emergency.

    Enough rambling from me...
     
  40. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Mr. Know-It-All

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    Jan 31, 2007

    I work in a high school Spec. Ed. class.

    Using the bathroom during class time is NEVER an option. My attitude towards this is that these students are old enough to know how to control their bodily functions. I tell them that they need to make better use of their time than using the bathroom during class time.Go to the bathroom during lunch, breaks, or free time, but not during lectures or classroom instruction. Usually, I will let them slide once, but after that, they just have to wait until the period is over. In my ten years at this job, I have never had anyone walk out, or pee their pants. They know the expectations when school starts, and they may try to test it once, but that is usually the end of using the bathroom during class.

    Of course, there is always the clever student that goes to the bathroom towards the end of break or lunch, and just stays there reading a book as they hide from whatever class they should be at. Haven't quite figured out how to combat that one yet. :)
     

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