Students that keep track of the teacher

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by MissaG, Nov 1, 2006.

  1. MissaG

    MissaG Companion

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    Nov 1, 2006

    How do you nicely put a stop to students who question everything a teacher does, says, etc...???

    I work at a small school and began there in the middle of the year last year. I began teaching 5th grade and now teach 5th and 6th Language Arts and Social Studies. So I have the same class for sixth grade that I did last year. It is a very small class...13 students. They are very used to it being small and maybe they are comfortable with each other and me. I have several students, but one in particular that is driving me nuts, that want to be additional teachers I guess.

    The one that has been really getting to me lately is a wonderful student. She completes everything early, does everything I require and more, and is just on top of it all...including me! Whenever I am giving directions for a project or assignment, she interrupts and tries to add her bits and pieces. She questions things that I do all of the time, keeps track of time, is very concerned about things being fair all around and jumps down my throat if they aren't, and wants to be a part of every conversation. If I am talking with another student about something, she will ask "What?" a million times until I acknowledge her. As soon as I say "Don't worry about it," she cops an attitude and has even made that noise "Reeeeerr" at me.

    She oversteps the boundaries because she is an only child and is treated like an adult at home. She is part of adult conversations and thinks that it is the same at school. I try not to make a big deal out of it because she isn't a problem in any other areas, but this week she is really wearing me down.

    Any suggestions?
     
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  3. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Nov 1, 2006

    I remind my students that it is rude to interrupt and to join in a conversation uninvited. I also tell them that if it continues there will be consequences. I have a tally mark system (1 tally mark= 1 minute of recess). I did a couple social skills lessons about this at the beginning of the school year. A favorite line of mine is "Worry about yourself." I then send them on their way or direct them to what they are to be doing -- no discussion; just my teacher look if they don't go do what they were told to do.

    Why don't you pull your student aside and talk to her (you could decide on a signal you could give her when she is interrupting) or do a whole class social skills lesson and have them write a paper on manners or give them scenerios and have them act them out. Talk about how people feel about the person who is acting inappropriately and what the person can do if they will like to join in the discussion.
     
  4. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Nov 1, 2006

    Mostly she has to be TAUGHT how to do all of that.

    "Please do not interrupt" when it is appropriate and quiet to say so.

    Sit and explain that you love that she is smart enough to answer and participate, but in class you need her to wait until it is class discussion time. Then tell her you will add "any questions" at the end so that she has time to say what she would like to add too. Then if she tries to interrupt the lecture, remind her to hold comments and questions to the end. Thanks. EXPECT IT, not ask.

    Also maybe have a conversation (privately) about tattling and "little things and big things to worry and tell." Remind her that you are the teacher and appreciate that she wants to help but it is your job. Thanks for looking out, but you need her to worry about her.

    In the same conference remind her that interrupting others while you are talking to them is rude and if she sees you talking to someone, the polite thing to do would be to wait (and maybe not listen) until you are done and then to RAISE your hand (or whatever your policy is). Explain that not only are these normal rules for everyday life but that having a class full of students means we have to be fair to each other. Maybe you two can develop a code word like "panda" which means if you say that, she has to be quiet and wait. She is to try to do it without the code word, but that's your non humiliating reminder.

    After all the talks, consistency and reminders will be the key. Having another talk later when she starts forgetting more often may help too. She can do it!
     
  5. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Nov 1, 2006

    Well said DeafinlySmart!!
     
  6. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Nov 1, 2006

    I told a student last year that we weren't team teaching. She got it and cracked up.

    Your student definitely needs you to consistently enforce the rules about respect - the teacher always, anyone who is speaking, authority. I agree that these kids can be very trying.
     
  7. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    I say, Thank you, but I don't need your help. I can handle it all by myself since I'm a certified teacher and have a college degree. When you have the same credentials, you can run your own class. But, for now, I don't want to hear your input on this again.
     
  8. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Nov 1, 2006




    I chuckled when I read that. :D I had a student who did that when he was in the first grade and continued when we went to second. He was constantly telling me what we should be doing next, according to the time on the schedule. Finally, after year two, I got fed up and told him that I would be the teacher today since I went to college and all. He got the hint, after a nervous look, and stopped doing it, for the most part.
     
  9. Crazy4Kids

    Crazy4Kids Rookie

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    Nov 2, 2006

    DeafinlySmart definitely nailed it!

    I have a poster that reads, "If you expect respect, be the first to show it."

    It also sounds as if she might need a bit more challenging work. I have had students who were early finishers and that can lead into trouble if they don't know what to do next. Create something for her to do (that she won't need your directions on) that she can go to when she completes everything. You could even tie in a priviledge of some sort to her controlling this disrespectful habit of hers.
     
  10. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

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    Nov 2, 2006

    I have a boy like that this year in 2nd grade... one word... HUMOR. I just joke about it and get my point across... Usually something like "You don't need to worry about that, that's why they pay me the big bucks." Gets the trick done. :D
     
  11. Celenia

    Celenia Rookie

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    Nov 3, 2006

    Obviously the student wants attention so whenever possible you need to stop responding to her. If she interrupts and then you carry on a conversation about whatever it is she's asking about you're validating her interrupting even you're asking her to stop.

    http://www.classroommanagementforteachers.com
     
  12. Miss_J

    Miss_J Habitué

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    Nov 3, 2006

    I had this last year in 5th. I kept reminding my student that I was the teacher and it was my job to give the instructions. Part way through the year it let up.
     
  13. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    Nov 3, 2006

    I heard of a teacher doing this once, and she said it worked ...she had a student who really wanted to be the teacher, and eventually got so fed up with it, that she asked the student to come forward. She then went and sat in the student's seat, and said, "you seem to think you can do it better, so please, go ahead. Teach us today." The student got flustered and didn't quite know what to do, and the problem stopped after that. Of course, to do this, you would have to be pretty sure that it wouldn't backfire on you, and that the student wouldn't just run with it. (Just something to consider :))
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 3, 2006

    I tell them the big tall blonde lady is in charge........(that's me)
     
  15. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Nov 5, 2006

    Wow! There is always at least one of these in every class. I think some people are just the in-charge type. She sounds like she has a lot of strengths, just needs to get the social graces down. Try to use her strengths when you need help with organizing, cleaning, anything she could do to help you out - like an assistant. This would give her the strokes she is looking for without using negative behavior.

    My first year teaching first grade, I had 21 kids. They about drove me crazy. Very bright, energetic, and busy. But I always felt like I was being run over! I finally figured out why: of the 21, 15 were either first born kids or only children!!! All of those 15 were trying to take charge, of me, the classroom, and each other. Crazy! And here I am the baby of the family - not the most organized (that year) and wanting to be spontaneous and flexible and make things fun. Hahaha! What a wild year that was.

    I have one little boy this year who wants everything to be the way it is supposed to be. He wears himself out trying to remind everyone of all the rules and nit picky stuff! I finally told him, "Just worry about yourself. There are too many people in this class for you to worry about everybody. That is too much work for one little boy. That is why I am here." He is coming around. I think these leader-types might sometimes be relieved to be told they don't have to be responsible for everything. The idea of giving her extra work as a privilege when she is done early is a good one. When I taught older kids, I had a "quiet corner," where they could go to read, color, do quiet puzzles, or other quiet work of their choice. But they had to earn it.

    Also, when I am talking to one child and another comes to interrupt or get involved in something that is not their business, I use my body to block their involvement. I just turn my back on them and put myself between the interrupter and the student I am talking to. It sounds mean, but they HAVE to get this message. And it works.
     
  16. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

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    Nov 8, 2006

    Yup, i have such a student - shes bright, has great ideas, but she always wants to do things her way. When I'm explaining how to do a worksheet to the class, she has picked up her worksheet, and in middle of my sentence she said "see, this is how we do it!".
    Or when I explaimed to the class that if they dont know how to spell a word, they should do their best to sound it out , she said "No, just tell the class to come to me, I'll tell them how to spell it!"
    I think that other kids are starting to get annoyed. (i mean, how would you like it if a fellow first grader came up to you during recess and said "I'm gonna test you on reading. S-A -T. sat! say it. sat!" ???)
    Anyway, I finally told her that if she would like to be a teacher one day, I am sure that she will excellent! But right now, there is only one teacher in the room, and she needs to listen to directions just like evedrybody else. We're workin on it, but its not easy to break such habits!
     

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