Students motivation at home

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by ctrejo10, Apr 11, 2017.

  1. ctrejo10

    ctrejo10 Guest

    Apr 11, 2017

    How can we motivate students to do their own research on a topic from a computer ether from a home computer or the library? It seems students will only do research if it is during class time.
     
  2.  
  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,964
    Likes Received:
    1,156

    Apr 11, 2017

    Give it as home work. It needs to be done at the student's own time.
     
  4. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2011
    Messages:
    819
    Likes Received:
    166

    Apr 11, 2017

    Pretty soon, we'll have to follow kids home, make sure they do their homework, make sure they eat, and make sure they go to school the next day.

    What can you do short of that? Nothing.
     
    Peregrin5 and SpecialPreskoo like this.
  5. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    5,263
    Likes Received:
    1,610

    Apr 12, 2017

    Don't forget get them dressed appropriately!
     
  6. MrTempest

    MrTempest Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2014
    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    175

    Apr 12, 2017

    Inform their parents of what is expected to be accomplished at home.
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,333
    Likes Received:
    2,220

    Apr 12, 2017

    If you are sure they have internet access or easy access to a public library, you assign a grade to the task and a deadline. You can also inform the parents of the expectation of the assignment.

    Aside from that, there isn't much you can do if they choose to not do the work outside of class except to change how the assignment is completed and require it to be done in class.

    What grade are the students and what type of school? Just a few or the whole class?
     
    christie likes this.
  8. rpan

    rpan Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    698
    Likes Received:
    534

    Apr 13, 2017

    I agree with everyone - parents need to know there is an assessment due and what is involved. I create a list of emails at the start of the year, so everytime there is an assessment, I pop a quick email to parents to let them know. If you have time (I don't often do), you can create some sort of timeline for parents as sometimes, parents need a bit of help to help their kids manage their time. e.g. By <insert date> your child should have completed xyz. By <insert date> your child should have completed abc etc.
     
  9. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    144

    Apr 13, 2017

    I respectfully disagree with your post (only given that this is a secondary education forum). While your approach is one that I would probably adopt for younger children, I feel that one of our tasks is preparing them for life after high school. Which means weaning them off of such structured support systems. Bear in mind. most of my students are seniors in HS and that probably influences my response. I spend quite a bit of time with my students talking about the differences between what they have experienced and what they will be experiencing going forward. Sometimes I believe we do so much to make these students successful in school that we fail to prepare them properly for anything past 12th grade.
    Don't misconstrue this to mean that I don't want my children to do well in the classroom as I do but they have to own some responsibility for it as well.
     
  10. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    5,263
    Likes Received:
    1,610

    Apr 13, 2017

    After a while it is basically a waste of time for you to care about their grades more than they do. They know what they have to do so if they don't do it it's on them. Remember, you aren't giving them certain grades...they are earning certain grades. Don't work yourself into the ground over this.
     
  11. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    5,263
    Likes Received:
    1,610

    Apr 13, 2017

    I agree. Maybe this wouldn't be so bad with freshman but after that it should be on them. Their parents shouldn't have to be told about assignments. It's really not doing them any favors to have their parents responsible for everything they do at home.
     
  12. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,662
    Likes Received:
    2,898

    Apr 15, 2017

    At BTS night I lay out the major assessments, give a handout that addresses how it impacts grades, and tell them that the students will be responsible for the work, but if they check their BTS notes, they should be aware that the projects will be ongoing. As the students age, fewer parents show up for BTS. So many parents track their students grades through software with the school that parents shouldn't be blindsided by low grades for missing assignments. At some point, these students must take responsibility for both their actions and lack of action. I don't believe that parents are totally surprised by their student's low grades, since these are the same students who are failing to be responsible for chores, etc., at home. I raised my child - everyone gets the chance to fail or succeed with their own children. That may sound harsh, but it is reality. I build in lots of checkpoints that yield grades to build to the final grade - the result is never a total surprise to anyone.
     
  13. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,333
    Likes Received:
    2,220

    Apr 16, 2017

    That's not harsh.

    I will point out, just in general, that sometimes a situation that looks like a parent if failing their child is actually a situation where it could be so very much worse and they are doing just about anything they can. I believe for some, even if something looks bad it is better than it would be if the parent didn't care.
     
    vickilyn likes this.
  14. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,662
    Likes Received:
    2,898

    Apr 16, 2017

    I can absolutely buy that. Furthermore, I am a big believer in do not judge until you have walked a mile in the other person's shoes. Some students seem to come from a home that "has everything", but the thing that is missing is depth of concern and the ability to put the child's needs first. As we should all know by now, throwing dollars at a problem without rolling up the sleeves and pitching in to find out what the student really needs is merely lip service. I have parents struggling to make ends meet who find a way to connect with their children and let them know they are not alone. Some parents work almost around the clock to keep their family fed, a roof over their head, and their children healthy in mind and body.

    I raised my son and with perfect hindsight, I can see things I could have done better. I always remember that lesson as I struggle with a student who is struggling. I believe that sjnews said it best - some children need some love.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  15. Macee

    Macee Guest

    Apr 19, 2017

    I think one of the best things we can do is to make sure there is communication happening with the student's parents, such as through email or a phone call. Communicating the expectation of the assignment and defining what is required of the student outside of class, offers you the support from home to help the student stay on track. This communication will also allow you to gain insight if there is another reason why the student is not getting their research done outside of class, such as not having access to a computer or library. Gaining this knowledge can allow you to adapt and find alternate solutions with the students.
     
  16. Saad Benry

    Saad Benry Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 26, 2017

    Hey I actually know about something you can do... PM me if you're interested in knowing!
     
  17. Saad Benry

    Saad Benry Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 26, 2017

    One really good way to help students complete their homework at home is to help them complete it.

    Most of the times students don't complete their homework because of lack of confidence in their knowledge, or because they are missing an information which leads to demotivation.

    I know that a service such as GradeSlam is pretty useful for schools to bring the homework completion rate up, students can ask for a teacher's assistance (not answers) in completing their homework and the conversation is sent back to the teacher in case there is anything to review.
     
  18. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,564
    Likes Received:
    743

    Apr 26, 2017

    To be fair, the only time I ever knew when assessments would occur well in advance was in college and grad school, when we would always get a real syllabus with major test and paper grades set from the start. I never got anything like that in HS. I think a lot of times what we end up doing at the secondary level is kind of covering our butts for not having everything planned out in advance. I agree that emailing parents is a bit much, though!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Colliemom,
  2. Iris1001,
  3. Taffyphoebe
Total: 241 (members: 7, guests: 199, robots: 35)
test