Students First

Discussion in 'General Education' started by TAJ, Aug 20, 2020.

  1. TAJ

    TAJ New Member

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    Aug 20, 2020

    Have admin ever used the idea of putting students first to get you to do something you weren’t comfortable with, to work “harder”/take on additional responsibilities without pay, or made to feel like you weren’t doing “enough?”
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Aug 20, 2020

    There are definitely times where I feel like I have too much on my plate and I can see my principal coming toward me with a ladle. However, I have a good dialogue with my administration and feel comfortable saying that I need to defer on a project or get extra help with a task. I have never been told that I'm not doing enough for my students.
     
  4. whizkid

    whizkid Groupie

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    They love to use you when they know you're good at something.
     
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  5. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

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    Aug 22, 2020

    They also love to do it to people who are easily "guilt tripped." I used to be one of them, but finally learned. I remember when I was younger, I had a P who used to constantly tell me how good I was at some things and that was why she needed me to _________. lol I'd fall for that too hook, line, and sinker. I still like her a lot, but laugh about it now. They'll drain you dry if you let them.
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 22, 2020

    It seems to be the number one tactic employed by some administrators.

    Years ago I had a great principal. He and I got along well, always had inside jokes with each other, and I truly felt like he supported me and my program. When my family decided to move out of state so that our kids could be closer to their grandparents and extended family, he completely turned his back on me and didn't talk to me for the rest of my time there. On my very last day, I went into his office to say goodbye to him. He gave me a hug, told me that I was the best in the entire district at what I do (and he had also sent that part in a schoolwide email the day before, which was nice), told me I was selfish for wanting to put my own children first, and told me how sh***y I was for leaving because "kids in this neighborhood always get screwed, and you're just another great teacher screwing them over." I was too stunned to reply so I just turned on my heel and walked out. I spent the drive home crying, until I realized that he was just trying to guilt-trip me into staying and make me feel bad for leaving.

    I give everything of myself at school. I am allowed to care about my own kids, too. I am even, gasp, allowed to care about my own kids more. No one is going to make me feel bad about that.

    At my school after that, it was plainly obvious that they valued teachers who went above and beyond. There that meant participating in daily and weekend extracurricular activities, among other things. When I first started there, I felt like the new hotness and that the superintendent really liked and valued me. He asked me a few times to participate in this or that, months-long commitments to activities that would take me away from my family and add to my already horrifically long commute, and I politely declined. Once it became apparent that I wasn't going to basically move in at school and live my life there, I started to get the cold shoulder, but they did keep trying to pressure me into doing more and more. I knew it wasn't a good fit for me.
     
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  7. GeetGeet

    GeetGeet Companion

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    Aug 25, 2020

    I sometimes resent that there's sort of an unwritten "rule" that teachers go above and beyond without compensation. I do understand that sometimes you have to go to a certain school function, etc, but to actively praise teachers that constantly donate their time seems to devalue the private lives of teachers. We are professionals, and many of us do a LOT of work outside of school, including myself, like grading and planning. If I went to a ton of events or took on more I don't think I would have much time for myself at all.
     
  8. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Aug 25, 2020

    I've yet to see it, at least as strongly as I imagine it could be. My state doesn't even have a true union, yet I now seem to recall all sorts of statements about what they can and can't make us do, with varying amounts of grudge.

    The only time I felt like I should be doing more wasn't about the students, but about the other teachers.
     
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  9. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

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    Aug 25, 2020

    I totally got this even after my attitude was changed. There were certain after school events that teachers had to do. If you didn't agree sometimes, it'd impact other teachers. They'd be asked to do it.
    A few years we had to have a tutor teacher after school for our grade level. Although it pd pretty well, all of us had our plates full. None of us wanted it, so we agreed to each rotate weeks. The office didn't like the idea, but none of us wanted to do it to begin with and that was the only way they could cover it. If you didn't take a rotation, someone else would have to pick up the slack. They finally stopped that program and let noncertified people to do it.
     
  10. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Sep 5, 2020

    Definitely. At a time when our staff was feeling very overworked and burnt out collectively, we had a principal give us a speech that we’re here for the kids and if we don’t care enough about them to work hard then get out. It totally invalidated very valid concerns about workload and several teachers did get out at the end of the school year. We had high turnover with that administrator.
     
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  11. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Sep 5, 2020

    My wife is a para and I warned her that being good just gets you more jobs. They stuck her in a K class last year for 10 weeks as the teacher with NO aid time because she could do it. They run get her to escort or help kids that no one else can handle. She is a natural teacher and makes 12k a year...........She loves the job but min wage?
     
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  12. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Sep 5, 2020

    That is so wrong for so many reasons!
     
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  13. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Sep 5, 2020

    It is the lowest school in our district. The project kids all go there. They fired 2 of the five K teachers and struggled to replace them. She was good teaching the reading curriculum and then naturally figured out the rest. I guess it was illegal but in terms of the children she was much better than a parade of subs. I volunteered in the room for her some. She had a real handle on it along with the behaviors that ran off some teachers.
     
  14. whizkid

    whizkid Groupie

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    Sep 12, 2020

    Why won't the district help her to get certified?
     
  15. CaliforniaRPCV

    CaliforniaRPCV Comrade

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    Sep 13, 2020

    Doesn't sound like a district with the greatest of moral compasses. So, spend money to put someone on a higher pay scale?
     
  16. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Sep 14, 2020

    she would have to basically do four years of college. I dont think they have any kind of help for them. They did tell her there was a program IF SHE had a two yr degree to accelarate it and it would be much cheaper with $$ assistance.
     
  17. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    Sep 15, 2020

    Last year it really rubbed me the wrong way when an AP commended a SPED teacher during a faculty meeting for her dedication after hours. That she spent the previous Saturday late into the evening working on IEPs and whatnot. That's great she worked hard, and do not want to take away from her accolades, but it really should have come with a disclaimer that these actions were well above the normal expectation.
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 15, 2020

    I'm in a FB group for teachers. Recently an administrator posted that she had noticed her teachers leaving the building right when their contract time was up. She was worried that teachers weren't working longer hours or socializing at school. Most of the replies were pretty blunt: teachers don't want to spend more time at school right now because we are all overworked and exhausted. It's no fun teaching to empty classrooms (as the teachers in the admin's situation were doing), and no one wants to "socialize" at school if it means increasing risk due to longer exposures. It seemed that this admin was really, honestly clueless about where teachers are at right now in terms of mental and emotional workload. It really rubbed me the wrong way that she was assessing her teachers' commitment to their jobs and students by how much time they were spending in the building. During a literal pandemic. When there aren't even kids in the building.
     
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  19. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    At our school, there are a few "inner circle / star" teachers who are obvious favorites of the admin. The sad thing is that most of them are single, without children, and some still live with their parents. This school is their life. That's fine if their dedication brings them personal fulfillment, but it is often hard for other teachers with other responsibilities to stand out.
     
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  20. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 15, 2020

    My hoosband used to work with one of those types. This dude would come to school at 5 AM, no exaggeration, and stay until at least 8-9 PM, almost every single day, plus occasional weekends when the building was open. He had amazing classes set up in Schoology, but it literally takes him 6+ hours per day to set them up and maintain them. I assumed he was a loner for the longest time, because how else can you choose to have such long work hours as a teacher? Imagine my surprise when I learned that he is married with like three kids, one of whom is still pretty small. Honestly, once I learned that, I really started to side-eye this guy. I assume that he has an unhappy home life and/or that he is super fixated on being recognized as a standout at school. I feel sorry for him. Having an awesome Schoology doesn't sound like much of a win when you had to give up all your other interests, including your family, to make it happen.
     
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  21. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

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    Unfortunately, that disclaimer is seldom given. We were told at 1 time if we didn't want to "get onboard" ( which would take an extra hour or 2 a day) in a faculty meeting that we needed to get out asap. It was a nasty comment and hit a nerve with me. It seemed so disrespectful. They don't need teachers where I Iive, so they can do that! We have a decent union, but admin who could make your life miserable.
    None of us wanted "on board", but most of us needed our jobs. It took me a long time to get to the point where I could work contract hours + 45 mins. a day. The extra 45 minutes was needed just to get the basics done. Once I knew the curriculum inside and out, figured out shortcuts, started not caring what my LP's looked like, I was more careful to keep my life in balance. It took me years to get the juggling act down right.
    I have no clue how new teachers "do it all" b/c the workload has only increased over the years. The job was much easier before computers b/c once email came out, we would get forwarded stuff to do by so many different people and none of them had a clue what we were already doing. I am so thankful to be done with it all! I miss the fun kids a little, but not the time demands.
     
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