Students and those words that could be swear words but really aren't

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Backroads, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Feb 8, 2016

    Wondering on how others handle this balance of maturity.

    Every so often, words come across that have an alternate slang meaning that the youngsters are already well are of and are happy to point out as a bad word. I'll do preliminary screening, but I can't protect every book a student finds in the world, nor do I think I should have to. Variations of the donkey species and boys with certain nicknames should not exactly be banned, but how do you explain that to little kids jumping to point out the evil?

    Today it's giving me a headache.

    How do you personally address such word issues?
     
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  3. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Feb 8, 2016

    How old are your students?

    I try to be as matter of fact as possible to take the 'fun' out of using those words. If it's a read aloud sometimes I'll substitute the word to avoid the headache.
     
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  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I just use it as a teachable moment for context. In one context "ass" means one thing, but it can mean something different in another. They are usually accepting of this.
     
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  5. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    I'm with Miss Scrimmage; the key is to un-funny it. Come right out and say that sometimes books have words that aren't nice to use (you could talk about connotations changing over time, if applicable, or just keep it more general.) Let them know that you know it's there, and so does everyone else who's reading it, so there is really nothing so bright about pointing it out. If someone does point it out, you give them that "oh please" look.
     
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  6. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Feb 9, 2016

    Good advice!

    Like Miss Scrimmage, if I'm reading aloud, I just change it.

    The times it's unavoidable - like teaching the root word -dict, which sounds like a vulgar word for a body part - they just have to move on, and I make sure to really enunciate.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2016

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