student with vision issues

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by iluvteachin, Sep 9, 2007.

  1. iluvteachin

    iluvteachin Rookie

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    Sep 9, 2007

    In a sign language class, I have a girl with low vision. Her facilitator basically told me large print will be fine for her and I shouldn't have any other concerns. I've been doing just that... but the more I think about it.. the more I am concerned her vision will get in the way of her learning sign language.

    Should I have one of my teacher aides (student her age) sit with her and show her the signs I am doing in front of the class so she can see the shapes/movements better? She does have an adult aide but at my school we generally try to minimize their presence (which I completely support) ... or should I be the one to stand in front of her and have her see me with the rest of the class watching me from where I am standing..?

    I just don't want to offend her or make her feel like she stands out any more than she already does...

    any advice?
     
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  3. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 9, 2007

    If this is a high school student, ask her (discreetly) what she wants. Let her know that even if she can see you, that you have concerns with her seeing everybody else when they participate. See what she says. Your modification is what many do, but at that age it is more respectful to ask (considering she doesn't have mental issues as well). Also ask her if there is a specific seat or side of the room she prefers. One student of ours needs to always sit on my right side. When I was growing up in a hearing classroom, I always had to sit on the front row almost in the center but slightly off to the teacher's right side since my good ear is on my left. Funny part is I still sit like that even when sign is presented.
     
  4. Ms. Geography

    Ms. Geography Comrade

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    Sep 9, 2007

    Give her the extra one on one

    I'm visually impared and can tell you it's really hard to ask for help. Offer it to her and help her "see" what she may be missing by using your student aide as her buddy. It's good practice for the student aide and a great help for your student.
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 9, 2007

    I wouldn't want anybody to just ask me if I needed help to let them know. It IS hard to ask for help. By the same token, I know that sometimes well meaning adults will overdo it instead of allowing me the independence I needed. Most of my school career I didn't have any help. So then when I went to a school that offered it, I got it in spades. Some of it I wanted (which was why I was there), other times they were too smothering. In the long run I wanted people to ASK me if I wanted x, y, z services but done in a way that was explained and offered in a way that didn't seem like an imposition (which I didn't want to be). Definately secondary students struggle to fit in and all have different opinions about how much they are willing to accept from adults before they feel embarrassed. I bet we three could compare stories!! No wonder iluvteachin is trying to be extra careful. Also, check with previous teachers (even a few years back) and see what they did or noticed about this student.
     

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