Student with Hearing Impairment

Discussion in 'General Education' started by MrsC, Nov 9, 2015.

  1. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,067
    Likes Received:
    1,884

    Nov 9, 2015

    I have a student (grade 7) with a hearing impairment. He has hearing aids and an FM system so that he is able to function and follow along in the classroom. In the past, he has been reluctant to wear his hearing aids; this year, he all but refuses. He will sometimes put them in when prompted, but often won't turn them on. The hearing itinerant teacher has spoken with him and with parents about the importance of using his aids, but there is little to no consistent follow through. He feels that he can "hear okay" and that he isn't missing anything.

    We, his teachers, are at a loss as to where to go next with this? Suggestions?
     
  2.  
  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    8,675
    Likes Received:
    1,739

    Nov 9, 2015

    I'm guessing that, at his age, he doesn't understand the possible IEP reduction if he refuses his accommodations?
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,067
    Likes Received:
    1,884

    Nov 9, 2015

    The hearing itinerant has already reduced her time with him (from 3 hours weekly to 1 hour) because of his reluctance to cooperate. He thinks it's great--more time in class with his friends and less time with her. He's holding his own in some areas, but in others, he's struggling badly. He also has a significant LD, so we are still able to provide him service under that umbrella, so he isn't been left without any support (thankfully).
     
  5. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2011
    Messages:
    819
    Likes Received:
    166

    Nov 9, 2015

    This is a parenting issue. You can't force him to wear his hearing aids. Document the effects of not wearing them, and call an IEP meeting with his parents to discuss it.
     
  6. Rox

    Rox Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    586
    Likes Received:
    20

    Nov 9, 2015

    He is likely not receiving much benefit from his hearing aids. Teachers might think the student is benefitting, but to him, the perception is very different. I grew up with hearing aids and an FM system. The FM system had too much static and I could only hear my teacher, not my classmates sitting next to me. I told my IEP team that I did not want to wear it anymore, but nobody listened. To be fair, I wasn't able to articulate what the problem was. For six years, I wore the FM but never turned it on, and nobody was the wiser. I did receive a lot of benefit from my hearing aids, and continued to wear them because they were vital to my daily communication.

    I'm a bit shocked that IEP services would be reduced because he refuses accommodations??? Any disabled person has the right to refuse a specific accommodation and should not be penalized for it. Am I reading this wrong? I would compare this to a person refusing to use a cane when walking, so their disabled parking placard is taken away. Does that make sense? On the other hand, if he is attempting to be a normal kid, maybe reduced services is the right thing for him.

    Do you use other accommodations in the classroom, such as captioning for videos, facing the room when speaking, using more visuals, etc.?
     
    readingrules12 likes this.
  7. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,418
    Likes Received:
    1,175

    Nov 9, 2015

    Do you know the extent to which it affects him? That is, how well can he hear outside of using the hearing aid? If they can still technically hear to some extent, you might double check for understanding a bit more often with them (after doing some direct instruction, ask a question that requires them to repeat something that you had said back to you).
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,067
    Likes Received:
    1,884

    Nov 10, 2015

    Rox-- thanks for that; I'm going to try to find out exactly what his reluctance is. We've been working on the assumption that it's social (not wanting to "be" different), but it may be something else. I sent Mom a note yesterday requesting a meeting, hopefully that will give us more information.

    As far as his IEP and support services go, he is still receiving an incredible amount of support. He has accommodations in all subject areas and modifications in most. The only thing that has been reduced, at this time, is the time the Hearing Itinerant Teacher spends with him in the classroom; she is still very involved and her time with him can be increased again at any time. Our IEPs are living documents and are updated several times during the year as needs change.

    I was a Special Ed Resource Teacher for a long time and I have several students in my class with LDs, so certain accommodations are part of what I do on a daily basis--lots of visuals, chunking of assignments, material presented in a variety of ways, etc. The one thing that doesn't work well for my student is captioned videos--his reading level is low and he reads very slowly so he becomes frustrated with captions. I have provided transcripts and notes when I can.
     
  9. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,719
    Likes Received:
    482

    Nov 10, 2015

    I had a student (5th grade) like this a few years ago. Working with his hearing person (outside the school), speech pathologist, and sped teacher, we identified the times of day he absolutely had to wear it. Then we created an incentive plan for him to wear it without reminders.
     
  10. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,356
    Likes Received:
    844

    Nov 10, 2015

    A book I would recommend to all teachers concerning the FM receiver is El Deafo by Cece Bell. The book is an autobiography of her growing up Deaf and using this device, although at that time, it was a much larger instrument to wear. (It is not a Spanish book--she pretended to be a superhero and El Deafo was the name she chose for herself). An interview with the author in Bookpage a few months ago mentions that she chose a cartoon format for the book to best portray to readers her visual experience of her environment. (I would recommend previewing the book before giving it to young students to read; there is a tiny bit of what might be considered verbal mature content). Reading this book helped me understand a Deaf child's experience from a Deaf child's viewpoint.
    I don't mean this next statement as critical--I was not aware of this until I was told this by several of my Deaf friends. Most Deaf individuals prefer the term Deaf (often with a capital "D") instead of "hearing impaired", if they were Deaf at birth or became Deaf during childhood. A few other thoughts I had, if possible, I would highly recommend assistance or guidance from a teacher or counselor who him/herself is Deaf or hard of hearing, who perhaps maybe could even counsel with this student directly. Also, I was wondering, since at this age social connections and now-a-days the telephone are extremely important, is he making use of available telephone connections with his friends such as relay services? (For more information on free text TTY relay, dial 711 on any phone and ask for customer service. Wait through any computer-like tones until a voice person answers). Also, another thought, if he knows sign language, would he perhaps feel more comfortable with an interpreter instead of the FM receiver?
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,067
    Likes Received:
    1,884

    Nov 10, 2015

    Thanks, Obadiah. I'll certainly take a look at that book--sounds like it would be a perfect addition to our school library.

    I use "hearing impairment" because that is his official identification; he does not identify as someone who has challenges. In his mind, he hears just fine and doesn't need any assistance.
     
  12. Tutulson

    Tutulson Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    4

    Oct 27, 2022

    Getting used to hearing aids can take some adjusting. I know it because my friend with a hearing impairment.
     
  13. happymangle

    happymangle Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2021
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    13

    Oct 27, 2022

    My wife is going to get her first pair of hearing aids next months. She is a little bit scared and frustrated at the same time. We have another visit to hearing aids staten island next week and audiologist will help her to make a final decision. No idea how can i support her and what words to say.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2022
  14. edward_clark

    edward_clark New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2022
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 31, 2022

    Do you guys have any idea about benefits of monkey bars for kids? i recently read about it & i was amazed, i mean how can playing be so beneficial for your mental & physical health, you should check this for sure, for the wellness of your kids.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Anna_Yurk,
  2. devinoutfleet
Total: 195 (members: 2, guests: 179, robots: 14)
test