Student Who is Verbally Impulsive

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ku_alum, Aug 13, 2014.

  1. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Aug 13, 2014

    There may be a better way to describe this student than verbally impulsive ... we've all seen the student who can't stay seated. Well, this student doesn't stay quiet - interrupts, interjects, unnecessary comments.

    He is not in my classroom, but I was asked by his teacher if I had ideas how to help. All of the ideas that came to me go back to my behavior analytic roots that would be impossible to do in a classroom setting without derailing instruction for other students. E.g. using a fixed ratio of reinforcement for seconds/minutes of not speaking out.

    His reinforcer seems to be attention. He is a HS senior. His voice is a very booming-type of voice.

    What tactics do you have to share?
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 13, 2014

    Maybe giving him another stimulus like a fuzzy velcro piece to rub might help if he will buy into using it in place of responding verbally.
     
  4. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    Aug 13, 2014

    I would do something simple, like a jar of marbles (the flat kind) and when he is quiet for a predetermined amount of time, or just while the teacher is talking, drop one on his desk quietly. Keep adding as he keeps quiet, take away when he has an outburst. At the end of the hour he adds them to a special jar. When the jar is full he gets a reward.

    Works wonders, as long as the student likes the reward
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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  6. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Aug 13, 2014

    Yup...been there. I would suggest at this age level giving him post it notes or a pad of paper. Ask him to write things down before he says them. I have seen this work with a "verbally impulsive" student.

    Another one that works well is using a simple timer which has an alarm. He sets it for a certain amount of time (10 minutes for example) and then sees how many times he can make it for 10 minutes. A small incentive such as a good note home or something that might work in High school could help as well. This works awesome in 5th grade, and I think something like it could work in High School.
     
  7. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Aug 13, 2014

    I will share with my colleague these ideas. Keep them coming!

    Cza - That is something to consider, too. (I had just looked up Tourette's for a student in my room who has a facial tic when he speaks ... he didn't have this tic last year).
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Aug 13, 2014

    I think you'd be best off by finding out the root of this behavior. If it is solely attention-seeking, and the student is a senior, then this behavior needs to be curbed, SOON. In my classroom he would be detracting from the education that his classmates are receiving and I cannot tolerate such a thing.

    I teach about wait time to my students on the first day. I model my expectations and we even practice. Calling out is a major no-no in my room.

    If the student has an actual disability I would work very hard with his parents and the sped dept. to see what could be corrected while still maintaining the atmosphere I desire for other students. I would have a hard time having such a student in my advanced course where blurting out would diminish my questioning ability in class.
     
  9. hopesma

    hopesma Rookie

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    Aug 13, 2014

    If he does not have a special need that causes the behavior, then could you quietly give him a small stack of sticky notes as "talking chips". He puts one down when he talks, when they are gone, he can't share anything else. Or put tally marks on a sticky and he crosses one out each time for the same result. It might help him to have a quiet, non-obvious visual reminder to think before he shares everything that runs through his head.
     
  10. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 14, 2014

    I like the term "verbally impulsive"! I had a couple of students like this last year, and will have them again a few periods a week this coming year.

    The strategy of having them write on a sticky note before talking is appealing; I think t may work with my students and I'm certainly going to give it a try.
     
  11. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    That does sound like a good one. I had a few students like this, though they were younger. The one with the most successful turn-around was put on meds for ADHD.
     
  12. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Aug 14, 2014

    Oh man...I had ideas for you, until I realized you were talking about a senior. That's a tough one because if he hasn't been modified by now then there may be a reason for it. I think at that age it may be worthwhile to have an actual conversation with him 1:1. Explain the reasons it is not appropriate and ask for his thoughts on how the behavior may decrease.
     

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