student who asks a LOT of questions

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by HufflePuff, Oct 26, 2010.

  1. HufflePuff

    HufflePuff Cohort

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    Oct 26, 2010

    I have a student who asks questions CONSTANTLY throughout lessons. Sometimes they are relevant, sometimes they are not. She also always has a story to tell. The second she comes in the door, she has a million things to tell me...and this goes on all day.

    She is very sweet and I AM interested but after awhile, it gets to be a bit much.

    Suggestions?
     
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  3. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Oct 26, 2010

    If anyone raises their hand with something irrelevant to our discussion, I interrupt them and say, "That is not what we are talking about; pay attention to the question." I might then repeat the question. Or I might say, "Focus on what I am saying. Is that what I asked?"

    Children love to take the conversation in different directions. They have another agenda than you do. It's important to make it clear to them that you are the leader of the discussion and will not be sidetracked to the hundred different things that fascinate them.

    I also have no problem telling children to put their hands down.

    I do a lot of "turn and tell your neighbor" conversations, so that children have a lot of chances to express themselves.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Oct 26, 2010

    The turn and talk is a great idea to help overall. You may want to try giving this student a set number of objects that she can turn in to ask a question or tell a story. This way she needs to consider if the question is important enough to ask.

    Before you limit the questions, make sure that she is not asking questions because she doesn't understand though.

    Another idea is to have her write down her questions and give her a color code for emergency questions so you know to come over right away. For example, she puts up a red marker and you know that she wrote down an I need help question or I need to use the bathroom question...
     
  5. Momma C

    Momma C Comrade

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    Oct 26, 2010

    Even in 8th grade I have this problem with some kids. Like schoolteacher posted, kids like to take discussions in a different direction. Usually, if I feel the question is not relevant to the discussion, I ask them to explain the relevance to our topic. If they can, that's great, and they get an answer. If they can't---oh, well. This has cut down on some of the "new direction" questions, because they don't like to explain. I do try to catch kids in the hall to talk/answer their "irrelevant" questions. I explain that during our class discussion just wasn't the appropriate time for the question. :cool:
     
  6. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Oct 26, 2010

    I have a student who always has some kind of comment to make or question to ask and also always has to have the last word, even when talking with me.

    She sometimes remembers to raise her hand, but more often than not, just blurts out her comment or question at the same time. I try to answer any content questions she has, even if I feel she should already know the answer. When she asks a question that obviously shows she wasn't paying any attention to what I just said, I have no problem telling her she would know the answer if she had been paying attention.

    While I try to be positive, there have been a couple of times I've just told her straight out to STOP TALKING! I've also told her the constant talking (and interrupting of teachers) will get her in trouble if she doesn't learn to control it.

    She doesn't do it to be disruptive, she just seems to have very poor impulse control. If I DO have to chastise her (or any other student) about talking too much, I always try to go back to her (or others) with a normal and helpful "teacher tone" in my voice, so they understand the reprimand was only for speaking out of turn or inappropriately and I DO want them to continue asking questions or making comments relevant to the content being covered.
     
  7. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

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    Oct 26, 2010

    If the student is interrupting while you are addressing the class you can use WBT's Rule Two approach. It does not single the student out, and short circuit's their interruptions without giving them too much attention.

    If a student tries to break in while I am talking I say "Rule Two!" the whole class repeats the rule, "Raise your hand for permission to speak!" along with the hand gesture. It takes seconds and the kids get the picture pretty quickly.
     
  8. jayarr

    jayarr Rookie

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    Oct 27, 2010

    Such as a helpful ideas and I totally agree that raising a hand is a sign for permission to speak.
     
  9. cinaminsweet

    cinaminsweet Companion

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    Oct 29, 2010

    Parking Lot

    I got this idea from a teacher workshop. I have a portion of the board sectioned off that's called "Parking Lot." I tell my students that if they have additional questions, they can write them on a sticky note and post them in that spot. Periodically during the day, I answer/respond to the questions.
     

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