Student Turns HW in, You Put it ....?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by luckyal29, Oct 26, 2008.

  1. oldfashioned

    oldfashioned Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 26, 2008

    I can understand the temptation to throw daily homework away (though I don't do it.) Teachers are busy, busy people, and to sort and file 40 or more sheets (2 homework assignments x 20+ students) every day until it can be sent home, is time consuming. Some teachers let students sort and file corrected homework, but I find it becomes a privacy issue, and I am the only one who handles student work of any kind.

    When I was a new teacher, before I started using the "magic number" system and had students file EVERYTHING in numerical order, corrected homework would accumulate in a huge chaotic mess until I could sort and file it. Maybe if you send corrected homework home every day, handling it would not be such a hassle?
     
  2. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    3,318
    Likes Received:
    10

    Oct 27, 2008

    How about homework for seven periods of Language Arts - 3 6th grade, 2 7th grade, and 2 8th grade - each class with over 35 students? Daily!!!!

    I still graded it, and required each student to keep all returned papers in a folder.

    At least once a week, I gave each class a different "Folder Quiz," which consisted of questions like these: #1. Look in your folder and find your returned homework for September 10, and write down the correct answer. #2. Find your essay from October 7 and write down its title. Etc. Ten questions, none of which could be answered unless the student had obeyed me and saved all returned papers AND corrected them.

    Good students loved these quizzes, and the bad students, naturally, hated them. But just think how EASY it would have been for all of the students to just stick the returned papers in a folder!!!!! And yet, every time, the same kids would wad it up, even if it had a good grade on it, and drop it in the basket on their way out the door.

    I think our good students get far too few perks and not nearly enough recognition, and I think little things like this help them feel acknowledged. This also helped the occasional poor student learn that organization had its perks.

    I didn't give homework regularly; some weeks we had none, and other weeks we had it every night. It just depended on what we were studying. Students knew that it would be collected, graded, returned, and possibly recycled into more points! Or less, if the student didn't do what I told him to do.

    I can not even imagine NOT giving each student the gift of acknowledgement of his/her work, in a way that benefited the final outcome on report card day. Yes, homework is about organization, but it's also about practice. Many times a student can "do it" in the classroom, but at home, discovers that he actually CAN'T. Without this out-of-classroom data, how can we REALLY know who can and who can't? A test often means nothing. It's "on his/her own" that really counts!!!!
     
  3. teach_each1

    teach_each1 Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Messages:
    378
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 27, 2008


    I toss no namers. I explained to my students (haven't had the need/opportunity to do so with my parnets) that if they all took turns ie. Mark you take the first, Mary you take the 2nd, Webster the 3rd and only one person didn't put their name on a paper a day I'd know whose paper it was but because 2 or 3 of them forget their names I don't know who it belongs to.

    I tell them I do this, not because I'm a mean teacher but because I don't know who should get what grade. If I have a paper that's a 1 and a 3 who should get the 3? The kids all understand and know that they have the opportunity to re-do the assignment. I've never had a parent or child really question it.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Jr1973,
  2. James Parson,
  3. ErikaL
Total: 335 (members: 4, guests: 317, robots: 14)
test