Student Teaching vs. Intern Program

Discussion in 'Student & Preservice Teachers' started by Rookiewithexperience, Feb 9, 2017.

  1. Rookiewithexperience

    Rookiewithexperience New Member

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    Feb 9, 2017

    I would like to know peoples routes and experiences in either student teaching or an intern program.

    My background:
    I would like to know if those who student taught felt that it was wasteful as in they felt that they could have been okay to jump into a classroom without student teaching. Please be honest. I know subbing is very different than a real teacher but I've been doing this for four years, my mom ( teacher) and I are extremely close gives me some hope that I can do this without student teaching. Please offer me some advise.
    where I currently am:
    I have passed my Csets, and tpa 1 but would need my TPA 2 and 3 as well. and I still need the RICA :(
    is the paperwork while working really difficult? again, please be realistic. empower me to decide what I feel I can do.. thank you. experiences please
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Feb 9, 2017

    It honestly depends on the program you're entering to get certified. Teachers for America doesn't require pre-service time, and your previous experience could take you a long way.
     
  4. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Feb 9, 2017

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Feb 9, 2017

    The difference in California generally isn't between student teaching and internship but between a credential program and internship. Credential programs include student teaching but they offer much more - for one thing, a credential program is the likeliest setting for most of us to learn the content that RICA tests.

    A district might be willing to work with the OP on that, however.
     
  6. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Feb 9, 2017

    Just to offer a purely financial perspective - you are at a major disadvantage on many (most?) California salary scales if you do not have BA+30. Some districts around me freeze pay even at BA+30 at a pretty low level, basically making it necessary for teachers to eventually obtain either a lot of units or a masters (or sometimes both). I have BA+60 and am still not in the highest column on the scale in most local districts.

    My mom is a teacher, too. That has always been a huge help, but I needed the experience of student teaching for myself. The course content was valuable, too.
     
  7. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Feb 10, 2017

    I have the same background as yellowdaisies (second generation teacher who watched a parent up close). I didn't sub until after I was done my student teaching and received my certificate. If you have been subbing for some time, you still might want the experience of being guided through lesson planning and differentiating. If you're sure both are in your current skill set, then maybe TFA might be the best route for you.
     
  8. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Feb 10, 2017

    Our teachers who did not student teach are struggling, even those who had subbed for many years. While subbing may be good for management, it does not give the reality of being a teacher, and does not allow you to find your "teacher routine." Subs are not responsible for contacting parents, attending IEP meetings, or keeping up with paperwork, all of which I did during student teaching. Subs are not typically responsible for long-term planning, developing routines and procedures, or grading.

    My mom is a teacher, my dad is a teacher, and both of my older sisters are teachers, so I was well prepared for what was coming, but I a still glad that I had my student teaching experience. I can see our teachers who did not student teach struggling so much because there are so many things they just don't know.
     
    Caesar753 and yellowdaisies like this.
  9. Topsy

    Topsy Rookie

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    Mar 13, 2017

    Like you, I have subbed for four years. I am in my semester before student teaching, so I am in the classroom 2 full days a week, and the first few weeks I was mostly just observing. I just taught several lessons last week, and in the coming weeks my CoT and I will do some co-teaching.

    Honestly, I could sub in my sleep. Everything would get done, everyone would be happy, detailed notes would be left, etc. The prospect of being THE teacher is daunting. Consider that as a sub, I just had to get that day's work done. Many teachers did not want me to grade anything, just clip it and leave it for them. As a teacher, you have to lead EVERY child across the learning trajectory the whole year, from beginning to last day. Kids who can't read in the beginning need to show progress. Kids who don't understand place value in the beginning of the year need to be adding up to 100 by the end. Etc. Being THEIR teacher is important work.

    It would help if you elaborated on what you felt would be wasteful about a semester of full-time teaching.
    • If it's the $$$ (in that we have to PAY for the privilege of student teacher), then an alternate route program makes sense. You are supposed to have a mentor, but I have heard that in many instances, the mentor is so busy with his/her own class that you do not get their full attention.
    • If it's that you're not sure what the difference will be, I think PP's have also made the case that it is significantly different.
    • If it's that you just can't wait to be the teacher, that you are so excited and just want to get in there, imho, spending a semester being guided by a mentor and CoT, will make your first experience as THE classroom teacher wonderful. You will not only have the passion, but the training.
    Good luck with your decision, but you know my vote! ;-)
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Mar 14, 2017

    I'm honestly not sure what you mean by internship (although it appears everyone else does, haha). Do you mean like Teach for America? Are you already in a college program and this is something you would do at the end of your program instead of student teaching? Have you already done a lot of field experiences/practicums?

    I have a "resident teacher" this year as part of program for people who have BAs in something else and want to go into teaching. The idea is that you learn best hands on anyway, so the residents spend a full year working with mentor teachers while taking night classes for a MA. Next year, they're expected to get their own jobs and continue with mentoring through this program. The residents don't get paid, but they're getting their MA degrees at a significantly reduced price. I agreed to take on the resident because I felt this was a way better premise than something like TFA, and the mentor position is paid. I completely regret it now! My resident is having an extremely hard time. I agree that subbing would be completely different. My parents were also teachers, and I can also attest that doesn't prepare you to be on your own. I've thought about recommending that my resident spend a year subbing rather than pursuing a full time job next year, but I don't feel like subbing is going to really help her build up any of her lacking areas. After experiencing this year, it is absolutely mind blowing to me that programs like TFA put teachers into classrooms after 5 weeks of training.
     
  11. newbieeducator

    newbieeducator Rookie

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    Mar 15, 2017

    Hi! I should be starting my student teaching this fall and my program said that if we wanted an internship, we would have to find it ourselves. They also told us that no one in our county offered internships so unfortunately I have no choice but to student teach. :(

    I feel that subbing is giving me more teaching experience than student teaching would give me. All of the student teachers who I have talk to (from various programs) have all told me that at most, their master teacher will *allow* them to teach one full lesson (just for math, just for science, etc) maybe a couple times a month, if that. Seemed kind of ridiculous to me. They also said that they help out during small group rotations but mostly observe or do their homework in the back of the classroom. Not looking forward to this! :-/
     
  12. cocobean

    cocobean Companion

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    Mar 15, 2017

    It's unfortunate that student teachers around you aren't given more responsibility in the classroom. I was responsible for teaching the full day halfway through both of my student teaching placements. We (student teachers) observed for a week or so, began taking up small teaching opportunities, and eventually took over the full day. There were exceptions, however. I knew one girl who had a horrible relationship with her mentor teacher. She would begin teaching a subject then the MT would take it back, saying she was doing x, y and z wrong. The only time she taught was for formal observations. This wasn't the norm though.
     
  13. tigger88

    tigger88 Rookie

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    Mar 16, 2017

    I don't really know the difference between student teaching and an internship either because in my program it basically meant the same thing. The college I attended had three separate internships that you did while obtaining your education degree. Pre-1 you went to a school one day a week for 8 weeks. You were only there to observe; no lessons were taught. Pre-2 you went one day a week for 10 weeks and attended four mandatory seminars. You wrote and taught 2 lesson plans during that time that the mentor teacher evaluated you on. Then the Final Internship was when you did your student teaching. Mine was for Early Childhood so my 16 weeks were split up between two different grades. You had a couple of weeks to watch the mentor and then you were expected to take over the class. You had to write all the lesson plans and teach them.

    Prior to getting my teaching degree, I worked as a teacher's aide for 7 years. I thought I knew a lot about the classroom and about teaching BUT I was so wrong! I am thankful that I went the traditional route to become a teacher. It didn't teach me everything that I needed to become a teacher. You won't know how to do that until you have your own classroom but I did learn a lot and I don't regret a moment of it!!
     

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