Student Teaching performance

Discussion in 'General Education' started by JRene, Feb 20, 2020.

  1. JRene

    JRene Rookie

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    Feb 20, 2020

    I am having a lot of struggles with my performance. I can come up with a great idea, but I’m making a lot of mistakes. Some have to do with classroom management errors like when an entire class gets off task, how do you bring them on task? To thinking I made a good question and wondering why I even wrote it in the first place. I’m worried I’m not going to pass. Is this normal? I feel like I should be farther along.
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Feb 20, 2020

    Have you discussed your concerns with your cooperating teacher?...college supervisor?
     
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  4. JRene

    JRene Rookie

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    Feb 20, 2020

    I’m going to meet with my advisor tomorrow.
     
  5. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Feb 20, 2020

    Indeed. Discuss, discuss, discuss. Remember, you are still in many ways the student. This is likely your first time really truly being in the classroom, so you will see theory turn to disaster and that's part of the process.

    For one of your questions, a method when the class is really off-task is doing whatever you must do to get them quiet... and then just doing nothing but the teacher stare for at least 5 minutes.

    Prior to that, practice practice practice with a signal so they know what to look for.
     
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  6. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    I’m sure you are realizing sitting in a college classroom reading and discussing teaching and observing in classrooms is far different than being charged with herding 30 squirmy bodies. You have probably never been asked to be so “controlling” while, at the same time, attempting to build relationship with children that belong to other people. The regular teacher has weeks to build relationship while you have, perhaps, three minutes. When it comes to “errors” consider: It is natural to fumble and feel uneasy about skills tried for the first time. Things often get worse before they get better. It’s like riding a bicycle. What happened the first time?

    Question: How much discipline training did you receive in your college methods courses? If you did receive training, how much did you practice to mastery? When I did my student teaching I was told by my supervisor, “Don’t worry about discipline. If you teach your lesson well, discipline will take care of itself. And, besides, the rest you can pick up as you go along.” In other words, one of the most important parts of teaching, something that will be with me from my first day and until I retire, was reduced to “You will pick it up as you go along”.

    As a CT, one thing I did with my STs was ask them to write two plans: 1) instruction 2) discipline. In the discipline plan I prompted them to think of all the possible interruptions (goofing off) and what they plan to do about each. It’s too late to be on your feet in front of a class when two students get out of their seats to sharpen pencils, and you think, “What do I do about that?” Discipline needs to be planned in advance just like instruction.
     
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  7. JRene

    JRene Rookie

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    Feb 21, 2020

    I h
     
  8. JRene

    JRene Rookie

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    Feb 21, 2020

    I’m now taking classroom management. The school waited until the semester of student teaching.

    I’m having trouble thinking of consequences. My strategy, which isn’t working, is to move on. What advice do you have?
     
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  9. JRene

    JRene Rookie

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    Feb 21, 2020

    I have been doing some reflecting. I can make them stay during lunch. I can have them do an alternative assignment during group work. I can also have a bell to gain their attention. Any thoughts?
     
  10. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Feb 21, 2020

    Consequences are reactions to problems. As a strategy, it follows a mind set, “What should happen to ______ for doing _____ ?” Reactive management looks like this: nag-nag-threaten-punish. Teaching is a fast-paced game. As you know, disruptions can happen singularly or en masse one after another. It takes about 30 minutes for adrenaline to be reabsorbed into your body. At this rate, two disruptions per hour can keep you wired all day long.

    Ignoring has the best chance to work if you are working in a private room one-on-one. There is no peer group to reinforce behavior. In a classroom, ignoring is a questionable strategy due to: 1) reward - snickers, high-fives, “Way to go!” etc.- from classmates. 2) It teaches students goofing off is free. After all, you saw it and did nothing about it. Expect the behavior to continue.

    Students don’t read what you say. They read what you do. If you say, “My rule is to raise your hand before speaking”, guess what some students will do? Of course, some will call-out. Why? Because they want to know if you mean what you say. If you ignore the call-out because the student had a good idea (or hope it will go away) the lesson students learn is your rules are nothing but “hot air”. And if this rule doesn’t apply they will begin testing every rule just to find out where you really stand.

    Instead of thinking about “consequences” consider thinking about “prevention”. In this mind-set one takes the stance, “What can I do to prevent ______ from happening?” For example: We know students' behavior, for the most part, is determined by their physical distance from the teacher. Suppose you are writing on the board, and, out of the corner of your eye, you catch two students talking who should be working on the far side of the room. You turn, jab your finger towards them, “Jeff and Amanda. Get back to work!” Don’t feel bad. This is what many teachers do (I’ve done it). It’s classic reactionary management. The teacher has just become the biggest disruptor in the room.

    Suppose, instead, as you write a little bit of information you stop and prompt students to do something with it. You walk out and among students as they are working. Then back to the board - write-prompt-walk-supervise. In this method students are never “on the far side of the room” for very long. They are within a couple of steps. Can a student(s) still goof off? Sure. But the odds are 80-90% less likely due to your physical proximity. By merely moving your body you have prevented most disruptions from starting and saved yourself the hassle of nagging from across the room.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2020
  11. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Groupie

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    Feb 22, 2020

    I do believe prevention is key 80% of the time. Whenever you can, use natural consequences. They are nothing personal. Example: You refused to do the paper during the correct time, so you will need to get it done during a preferred activity.
    Sometimes, I'd say, " It looks like you are getting distracted by others. You'll get this done way quicker, sitting here ( in an isolated place). You'll be able to focus better."
    Then I just take the paper or whatever and put it in a quiet place. Kids usually follow, but if they don't, I will take a lot of their belongings and move them until the kid moves too.
    Don't feel so hard on yourself either, please. You are just learning, and we all make mistakes. I think you truly are more able to get classroom management down when you are on your own and see what works for the group you have. Just keep trying and learning! You'll get it! ;) Oh, the teacher stare..lol does work, along with clapping , and having a quiet sign. I am old fashioned, but I flipped lights off more than once, and had no problem with "heads on desks" until we can get it together.
     

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