Student Teaching begins in a month

Discussion in 'Student & Preservice Teachers' started by bros, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Nov 17, 2013

    My district didn't get too involved any of the times I had a ST. I was the decision maker in what my STs taught and how much they taught. Those decisions were based on how confident I was that my STs could adequately teach the content, manage the class and meet student needs...Yes, their colleges had goals for STs to totally take over, but my students' learning was ultimately MY responsibility so those timelines and goals were sometimes modified, or ignored (with communication to the college about why such decisions had to be made):2cents:
     
  2. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    897
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 17, 2013

    Wow, I just read this whole thread and its a lot. I am going to be blunt here. Why would anyone want to hire you? And I mean this as a valid interview question, not as a mean question. You don't have SPEd experience, you don't have 3-6 experience, you don't know or have any proof that you can accommodate 3-6th graders. It seems to me you are only going to go for your district so what happens if there are no openings?

    You say you can't work on SSI but that isn't true is it? Yes, technically to qualify the government says that it thinks is you can't work but it doesn't forbid it. Have you thought about being some sort of aide, if you really want to be in a classroom? I don't think you would make enough as an aide to cancel out SSI. And that would get you much needed experience.

    Have you thought about any other jobs? What about a desk job? A job where you are just on a computer? Work from home? Something that you can do with much less accommodations. I don't really see a passionate love of teaching coming from you. Or can you live off of SSI and be a volunteer advocate? You live with your parents so maybe not working and just volunteering would be best for you?

    I say all this as someone with disabilities. I know it sucks to not be able to do things others can do so easily. But at some point you have to realize that you can't do certain things and that it is time to move on to something you can do with 100% effectiveness. I don't know that a principal is going to want to risk it with you, especially when they have a class of kids at stake and there is no proof you can do it.

    You seem to really know all the disabilities laws. Do something with that. I know it's needed because I have tried to find people like you and never can. Good luck
     
  3. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 17, 2013

    I did my preprofessional field experience in a fifth grade resource room, where I taught approximately 10 lessons. I did my first pre-professional field experience in a general education fourth grade classroom. I am performing my student teaching in an inclusion Kindergarten and a general education Kindergarten.

    I will be applying to jobs in my district and the ones around me

    After my SSI hearing, the judge told me that if teaching doesn't work out, I should become an advocate. My neuropsychologist said that teaching elementary would probably bore me after a few years because of what he saw in his evaluation.

    I genuinely enjoy teaching. Once you see that look on a kids face where you know they get the material - that is an amazing feeling. I love going to school every morning and seeing their smiling faces as they walk into the class. I love imparting knowledge and inspiring change with my students.
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    7,946
    Likes Received:
    4

    Nov 17, 2013

    I honestly don't consider most field experiences other than student teaching to be "experience".

    I am glad you're enjoying student teaching, though.
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,601
    Likes Received:
    2,710

    Nov 17, 2013

    To take things in a newer direction....

    bros, what would you say you've learned so far during your student teaching experience? What can you do now that you couldn't do or didn't know how to do before?
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 17, 2013

    I've learned how much proper classroom management matters. In the afternoon class, my CT keeps students engaged constantly. In the morning class, the kids occasionally have some downtime, which leads to a loss of control in the classroom. Not saying that students should always be working, but they should be doing something, so if they are talking, they are talking while working.

    I've become much better at managing my anxiety while in school and i've learned more classroom management techniques. I've learned the importance of an engaging lesson for student understanding. You play to your audience.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,601
    Likes Received:
    2,710

    Nov 17, 2013

    So now that you've learned that classroom management and engaging lessons are important, what specific strategies have you learned for implementing those things? What specific strategies have you yourself done, aside from watching your CT keep students engaged?
     
  8. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 17, 2013

    For engaging lessons, I use multisensory methods of instruction. In math, manipulatives are key. For classroom management, there are multiple methods I could use ranging from whole class - where the teacher claps, then the students repeat the clap, to the individual student, where the teacher redirects the student to be on task.
     
  9. RadiantBerg

    RadiantBerg Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2013
    Messages:
    618
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 17, 2013

    In an interview, that would get marked as "vanilla" or "generic" or "textbook". How have you incorporated multisensory components? What types of manipulatives have you employed, and how do you know they were effective?
     
  10. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,061
    Likes Received:
    538

    Nov 17, 2013

    Yes, you need examples of specific lessons where you have used these strategies. If you have written evaluations from your CTs for these lessons, even better!
     
  11. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 17, 2013

    I have incorporated multisensory instruction through the use of audiovisual components, such as songs or games on the smart board to reinforce hard-to-understand concepts like Estimation and having students guess how many objects were in a container while prompting them not to count the objects in the container.

    Another example of manipulatives I employed was when we did a lesson on number recognition/1:1 correspondence - the students were given a chart with 0-10 going down the side. They had to stick stickers in each box to make the numbers i.e. 1 sticker in one box for 1, 3 stickers in three separate boxes for three.

    I have written evaluations from my supervisor for these lessons.
     
  12. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    897
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 17, 2013


    In those 10 lessons do you have any proof of how you adapted lessons for your disabilities? A video of the lesson? Student work? If I were a principal I would want to be confident that you could teach effectively.

    What your neuropsychologist says means nothing. He has no idea what goes into teaching. Sure it could bore you but if you can't do the work you won't get to the "boring" part he was talking about.

    I am glad that you like teacher and your experiences. If it doesn't work out then maybe you could work as an advocate for disabled children or something in that aspect.

    Have you started to put together a portfolio? That would be something to do before student teaching ends.
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Nov 17, 2013

    Here's what we are dancing around, and has been pointed out by some: you are going to have to overcome a lot of resistance during the hiring process. You have stated you have no work experience because your disability makes it difficult to work but what has changed to make it possible for you to work now? Youve said you are 'cripplingly' shy but administrators and hiring teams will want to know you can handle parent conferences, administrator feedback, working on grade level teams. you've been dinged on behavior mgt time and time again...your goal of modulating your voice to manage behavior is not enough. Truthfully, your answers to questions posed before on these very concerns are not enough:2cents:
    As much as how far you have come should be celebrated, one is left wondering if you've reflected on these challenges in a real way...it's hard for most of us to imagine you making it through the interview process (read the job seekers forum to see how challenging it is...and NJ is a TOUGH market) and if hired, how successful YOUR STUDENTS would be as a result f that decision. I know as a parent or as a potential colleague, I'd be very concerned.
    You've been advised here online and by your therapist to perhaps seek employment in what seems to be your strength: disability advocacy, special Ed law...these might be better avenues through which to seek your passion and make a positive difference for kids.
     
  14. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 17, 2013

    I don't have any student work or videotaped lessons from then. All I have are the lesson plans.

    I'm required to make a Teacher Work Sample for my college, which entails putting together a unit plan, teaching it, and reflecting on it as well as how it ties into your teaching philosophy.

    I'll be videotaping a lesson sometime in the next few weeks (Probably the week of December 2nd in the afternoon class, as it would be easier to get parental approval there, as only a few parents there did not consent to have their child's photo on the internet, so they might be more amenable to agree if only myself, my CT, and representatives from my college can view it)

    My anxiety has improved. Three years ago, it was classified by the SSA as severe, and was one of four reasons I was declared disabled and unable to perform substantial gainful activity. I would classify my anxiety as moderate now.

    First, I will try to get a job as a LTS. If that doesn't pan out, I will try to substitute teach while staying under the SSI limit.

    I'll also consult the SSA's Red Book, and i'll probably take advantage of the SSI Ticket to Work Program.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Nov 17, 2013

    So what is your goal, exactly?
    Collecting SSI while working as a sub?
    Getting experience and honing your skills while doing above?
    Primarily seeking full time teaching but accepting above?
    Other?
     
  16. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,653
    Likes Received:
    233

    Nov 17, 2013

    Sue had a great idea about being an aide to gain experience as well. It's nice to have a consistent place to work (since subbing doesn't usually provide that), and you get a lot of experience. I was an aide for the spring semester after I graduated (I graduated in December) in a resource classroom. It was great experience and the school that hired me considered it as valuable because I was working with students who qualified for RSP services. I think you might really enjoy something like that.
     
  17. bison

    bison Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2012
    Messages:
    874
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 17, 2013

    I agree that being an aide would be very useful, especially if you can find a position in special ed that you're able to do. I've been an aide for a while now while I gradually work through my credential program, and I've learned SO much. I learned a lot about special ed and the job of a special ed teacher when I worked as an aide in that area, even though it's not what I plan to do as a career. I've really enjoyed it as well. My only concern would be that special education positions usually require a lot of things you might struggle with (physical assistance, helping students write by hand, etc), but there may be a position out there that will be a good fit for you. If you can't find a position right away, I would DEFINITELY volunteer in special education so that you can try to make up for the lack of experience in your student teaching program.
     
  18. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    897
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 17, 2013

    Another good thing with being an aide is that you have more time to come up with concrete proof of how you will deal with your disabilities. As of now, you have no evidence of how you will deal, and you won't get this evidence in your grade level you will be applying for. When you interview you want to show as many examples as possible so that they have confidence in you. You don't have that now.

    And with an aide's salary and SSI you could make more than (or close to) what you would teaching. I was an aide for a year because I didn't feel confident enough for my own classroom. It was great. Why rush it when you don't have to?
     
  19. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,763
    Likes Received:
    1,718

    Nov 17, 2013

    Bros, is your ultimate goal to be gainfully employed and off SSI?

    It does seem to appear that you expect the gov't to continue to support you even if you are working...providing transportation, electronic equipment, etc.

    I would think that if you continue to expect to receive SSI, then you won't be able to take a full time teaching job because you will then be making too much money.

    If that's the case, some of these other opportunities that posters have suggested may be good choices.
     
  20. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 17, 2013

    My goal is to seek full time employment, but I know it would be difficult to get full time employment at this point in the year, so I will probably do subbing while collecting SSI to get experience, hone my skills, and get my foot in the door in districts.

    Let's see.

    In the districts around me, the following positions are currently posted:
    Special Education/Regular Education Teacher (Position Available 1/02/14)
    Elementary School Teacher (1/21/14-6/30/14)
    Elementary School Teachers (Long-Term Substitutes):
    • 1/02/14-05/23/14
    • 02/03/14-06/30/14
    • 03/13/14-06/30/14
    • 04/07/14-06/30/14
    Teachers of Students with Disabilities/Teachers of the Handicapped LTS (12/23/13-05/15/14)

    I think para's earn around 25-30k a year or something near that. Which would disqualify me from SSI, but would be under the medicaid threshold, allowing me to keep medicaid while working, as long as I stay under $34,000 income.

    My ultimate goal is to be gainfully employed and be off of SSI. I do not expect the government to provide transportation or equipment - at most, I would like to still be eligible for my county's disability transportation, which provides transit as a reduced cost ($4 anywhere in the county) to disabled residents.

    The NJ department of vocational rehabilitation has already helped me significantly - because of them, I have virtually no student loans (I'll be graduating with ~3500 in loans).
     
  21. bison

    bison Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2012
    Messages:
    874
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 17, 2013

    Many para positions are part time, at least around here. Probably the majority of them.
     
  22. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    897
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 17, 2013

    So it seems like being a para would be a good idea right? Gets you off SSI but still on Medicaid. Yes, it isn't a ton of money but with you living with your parents you don't have a lot of expenses.

    Maybe this would be something to look at for next year?
     
  23. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,653
    Likes Received:
    233

    Nov 17, 2013

    This exactly. Mine was I think around 20 hours a week. (I had another job in the afternoon.) A lot of districts are cutting para hours because they don't want to have to pay health benefits for them.

    When you posted the positions, were you demonstrating that there are no para positions available? That might be true now, but I know that new positions can and do open at any time. Around here, I've noticed that para jobs open up very frequently because the turnover rate is much higher than it is for teachers.
     
  24. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 17, 2013

    Yeah, and to show what positions are available in my area. I'll apply for the teaching ones, see if I can get them, if not, i'll try to sub/find a para position.
     
  25. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,601
    Likes Received:
    2,710

    Nov 17, 2013

    bros, what do you think about the suggestion to apply for a para position as a first step?
     
  26. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 18, 2013

    It's a good first step. I'd just need to find a position to apply for. I will probably apply for both teaching and para jobs, with more emphasis on para positions.
     
  27. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 18, 2013

    My supervisor came in today for an observation - she liked my lesson, said there was only one critique - that I need to improve on my classroom management skills.
     
  28. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,304
    Likes Received:
    887

    Nov 18, 2013

    Glad to hear the lesson went well, but be careful using the word only in regards to classroom management skills. That's kind of like saying, "But other than that, how was the play, Mrs. Lincoln?"
     
  29. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,601
    Likes Received:
    2,710

    Nov 18, 2013

    Yep.
     
  30. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    7,946
    Likes Received:
    4

    Nov 18, 2013

    :lol:

    What's the issue, exactly? Talking, off-task behavior, something else?
     
  31. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Nov 18, 2013

    Learning is compromised when there is a lack of behavior mgt...it really doesn't matter how organized the plan, how beautiful the visuals, how differentiated the activities. If you aren't managing behaviors, it's all for naught. :( it's something that's been brought up time and again since before your ST experience bros. this should have you very concerned.
     
  32. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 18, 2013

    I cracked up way too much at that.

    Talking and inattentiveness from a few students who constantly exhibit this behavior - they had been warned earlier in the day by the gen ed teacher, the paraprofessional, and my CT, but they were still acting up.

    In my afternoon class, my CT will stop her lesson if a student is being very disruptive, ask them to get off the carpet, and sit in a chair for the rest of the lesson. In the morning class, the strategy is more try to talk over them, it seems.

    One comment my CT and supervisor had was that I should remember to use the behavior management already set up - such as the clapping and having students clap back. I just forget sometimes during a lesson.
     
  33. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Nov 18, 2013

    You need to be monitoring student learning and behaviors consistently while you are teaching. You can't forget to manage misbehavior.
     
  34. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,763
    Likes Received:
    1,718

    Nov 18, 2013

    Bros, you have identified behaviors that the teachers in the classroom deal with. Since this is your classroom now, what are YOU doing about the behaviors (aside from waiting for the other teachers to handle it)?
     
  35. RadiantBerg

    RadiantBerg Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2013
    Messages:
    618
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 18, 2013

    Yeah, at that stage in the game it should be your strategy that we are discussing...if you don't like the talk over them strategy, adopt something else.
     
  36. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Nov 18, 2013

    but you got the point, right?
     
  37. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 18, 2013

    I know.

    It's also a bit difficult because in the morning, the teachers are very inconsistent with their behavior management system.

    I will usually say the student's name, ask them if they can be quiet so they and their friends can learn, then I go back to teaching. Then they'll start talking like a minute later.

    The talking over them strategy does not work for me. I am not loud enough to do that. I am soft spoken.

    Yes. It's saying that even though there was only one critique - it was a bit one. Pay attention to everything.

    My classroom management skills were rated a 3/5 on the midterm evaluations, but I still have a lot of room for improvement.

    The primary instigator of behavior issues today was acting up all day - they had been talked to multiple times that day by everyone in the classroom and nobody did anything. No note sent home, their stick wasn't moved to yellow, they didn't get a bad sticker, nothing.
     
  38. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,061
    Likes Received:
    538

    Nov 19, 2013

    See my notes/questions in red.
     
  39. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Nov 19, 2013

    I try to be consistent.

    I know the talking over them strategy is poor management.

    I don't move their sticks while talking because my CT and the gen ed teacher never move the sticks. If they have someone move a stick (which is like once every two weeks or so), they will stop whatever they are doing and have the student walk over to the stick and move it themselves.
     
  40. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,763
    Likes Received:
    1,718

    Nov 19, 2013

    Now that you have been exposed to behavior plans in these two classrooms...what will be your plan in your classroom?
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. TeacherNY,
  2. marcosdani
Total: 220 (members: 2, guests: 200, robots: 18)
test