Student refuses to take their ritalin

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Kaley12, Feb 16, 2015.

  1. Kaley12

    Kaley12 Companion

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    Feb 16, 2015

    Deleted for privacy. Thanks for the responses!
     
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  3. mkate

    mkate Comrade

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    Feb 16, 2015

    Can you have them change his medication schedule so that he doesn't have to take the pill during school hours?
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    How do his folks feel about him being sent home? And are they aware that he's refusing to take his meds?
     
  5. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Feb 16, 2015

    sounds like a parental problem, not a teacher's problem. Sorry you are having to deal with the consequences.
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    You should discuss with the parents what you are seeing with regards to the effectiveness of the pill in class.

    I hope you are making extensive notes on why the student is being sent home. I assume they have an IEP if it is as severe as you say?
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I've never talked meds with Kids who are on them or with parents of medicated kids . One without a medical license cant really assertain that a kids beavior is solely because of meds ....It potentially opens up your school to financial/legal obligations....you aren't certified to make medical recommendations. I let the nurse do that. All you should communicate with parents is observations about this kiddo's behaviors and academics...let the nurse handle the pharma discussion.
     
  8. Koriemo

    Koriemo Comrade

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    Administering medication falls under the responsibilities of the school nurse, yes? This is something that should be discussed with the parents, the nurse, and the child's doctor.
     
  9. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I play no role at all with meds. If parents ask me to make observations, I will make observations. If parents ask me to send the kid to a clinic at a specific time, I'll send them at a specific time. If they ask me for recommendations... I'll refer them to medical professionals.
     
  10. Kaley12

    Kaley12 Companion

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    Deleted.
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Is there another placement within the district that might be better for him? If he is non-compliant with meds this often and needs individualized care, perhaps your school isn't the best fit for him.
     
  12. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Feb 16, 2015

    I've never heard of teachers having to administer meds.

    We have a handful of kids who take meds during lunch. The meds are administered by the school nurse or nurse's assistant.

    We did have a kid who was not on an IEP (therefore, not a SPED student) who refused to take his meds. We sent him home because he was a maniac without them.

    Schools have to be careful sending kids home for any reason (other than illness) if they're on an IEP.
     
  13. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I am not saying outright go "the ritalin is not working"

    I am saying something should be said along the lines of "So, <student> has been refusing to take his medication lately, and these are some of the behaviors I have observed"
     
  14. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Feb 17, 2015

    Oh the luxury of having school nurses. Ours were taken from schools in the 70s. Now the school staff have to administer meds. The only up side is that it is voluntary and the parents have to supply detailed written instructions with the meds. The admin also have to keep detailed records of how much and when meds are given.
     
  15. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    We also don't have school nurses. Meds are kept in the office, along with parental instructions regarding administration. One of the secretaries is usually the one who is in charge of giving out the meds.

    I would have a meeting with the parent and explain what you are observing and ask for their input into strategies--both to encourage the student to take his medication and how to manage his behaviour. Perhaps the parent could speak to the doctor about changing meds--perhaps a slow-release that will eliminate the need for a dose at school (most of our kids who take meds for ADHD don't need to take a dose at school).
     
  16. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    :thumb:this is a good idea...if the OP does have a nurse in the building, s/he should also be included in the meeting. Seems the parent is frustrated with the student being sent home and behaviors are compromising the learning environment. A team approach is best-with the nurse sharing the dosing issues, teacher sharing observations and parent sharing insights. Building such relationships benefits not only the kid, but connects all stakeholders in the situation in finding the right approach in supporting students.


    Seems abrupt....
    The parent already knows about the med refusals since he's being sent home so often.
    Such a message should be delivered with empathy for both the student and an understanding of the parent's frustrations while relaying the message that the child's best interests are at heart.
    MrsC's suggestion could go a long way in opening dialog in a compassionate, cooperative and caring way.
     
  17. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    My concern is that the OP had mentioned the child's behavior is already rather troublesome even before it is time to take the in-school medication which means the problem is beyond the fact the child isn't refusing the in-school medication.

    Also, even if the IEP does say the child can be sent home for poor behavior, at some point this should be changed if it is happening too often. A child can't be educated if at home. A child can't be educated if out-of-control, but the point of an IEP is to allow the child to have access to education which can mean using specialists to help the child access that education. If this means self-contained with a 1:1 aide, so be it. "Being sent home" is the easy way out of providing a child with an IEP support.
     
  18. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    ICAM! Being sent home may well be an illegal way of providing IEP support. The IEP should find a way to educate the child that involves the child actually getting instruction. I would be an upset mother, too. I have no idea where this is playing out, but someone needs to do more for this child. :2cents:
     
  19. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    If being sent home is functioning as a suspension for an IEP student, then they are probably just waiting for day 10 when a manifest review kicks in. At that point, an IEP review is mandated, and the school has a stronger case for a more restrictive environment.
     
  20. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Being sent home too much can result in the school being forced to pay for compensatory education for the student. Sending the student home is not something that should be on an IEP as something to be done for behavior. To a misbehaving student, they'll just see it as a reason to misbehave to the point that they get sent home. Sending a student home is not providing them with a FAPE.
     

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